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E T E E N F R T Y - E I G H T 



Published by the student body of Kansas State 
College, Manhattan, Kansas 




Editor: VIRGINIA GINGRICH 



Business Manager: TOM MOREEN 




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DEDICATED 



THE THOUSANDS WHO 




MADE '48 



RECORD YEAR. 











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AND CONGRATULATIONS 



KANSAS 



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The Wildcat scream — the scent of wet limestone after a soft spring rain — the 
face next to you in lecture — high notes from Matt's clarinet — the sleepy chill 
of a winter seven o'clock — a hand of bridge at the Union — the chime of a clock 
as you cram over coffee — the click of train wheels taking you to and from vaca- 
tions — the odors of stale smoke the morning after a bull session. These things 
are Kansas State. Or are they? 



These printed pages will help you decide — will keep your memories clear — 

will record the places you went, the way you lived, the people you saw, the 
feelings you had, the way you danced and the way you laughed, some things 

you learned — some things you have forgotten. 




STATE 



HER 8 5 T H BIRTHDAY 






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C H A P 1 . 1- 




" 1 H E HILL" C A L L L 



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C H A P T . 1M f^m G I A N C E A N G V E R N M E N T 



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C H A P I 




I H E R E WILL BE A MEETING 



CHAPL- 




IN SPECIAL R E C G N I 1 I N 



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C H A P I . 5 




COME ALL y E FAITHFUL 



C H A P T 




BED, BOARD AND BROTHERHOOD 



C H A P T . 



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CHEERS AND CHALLENGES 



C H A P T 




TIME OUT FOR TALENT 



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C H A P T . 9 



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THE PARCHMENT PARADE 



C H A P T . 1 ylgpf P R G R E S S I N G — T A CERTAIN DEGREE 



C H A P T . I V^mt^f AIDS TO COLLEGE LIVING 




I 



T REALLY isn't much of a Hill — you don't have to shift into second to make it — but then it's been 
called a Hill a long time and probably thinks it is one by now. Anyway, the slope of ground is 
not the important thing about this hill. 

The important things are the people and buildings, the trees and curving walks. Signs all over 
the Hill tell you that the Kansas State College campus is one of the most beautiful in the country. 
Well, really, you don't need to be told. Look at the icy mist that hangs in the trees and bushes early 
on a snowy morning — at the bright green dip of the grassy quadrants — at the almost church- like 
windows of the library. 

And this Hill deserves veneration. Nearly twenty-two college generations have studied on it, sur- 
veyed it, plowed it up, danced, walked and sat on it. 

The Hill has almost become a city. It looks a little surprised at the way it has grown, but not dis- 
pleased, and trying hard to push aside the mushrooming of barracks around its skirts. More feet 
pound its pavements in one semester than it ever thought it would suffer from in two years. Cars 
line up impatiently on its slopes and narrow drives, forcing parking lots to take over large stretches of 
lawn. 

Despite the havoc unheard-of enrollments have wreaked, the Hill seems smug and complacent. It 
has its old books, blackboards, limestone arches and professors, and thoroughly regards itself as a 
fountain of knowledge for the youth of Kansas. Maybe the Hill is right. 



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I 



'M PROUD of myself — I'm an influence in the community, state, and even the nation. Maybe 
not all the credit belongs to me — I'll admit that others have helped me out here and there 
through the years. 



Eighty-five years ago, I was just a hill. I have not increased much in physical stature, but then, to 
coin a phrase, you can make a mountain out of a molehill. I, and the people who govern me, represent 
tolerance, progress and knowledge. You can't say that for just a molehill. 

The men, who for the major part, have made me into a mountain, are those fondly called the 
faculty. Among them, I have a few old friends who have been with me during my adolescence and 
throughout their lifetime. Those are faces I know best. Other men, young, brisk, capable, are begin- 
ning to take their turn at the helm and are spreading me out over acres of land and new fields of 
learning. They are pouring cement on my face and drilling holes in my bluegrass. I don't mind — 
such is the march of progress. 

This past year, things have happened almost too fast for me, who am used to the deliberate pace 
of a commencement processional. The administration saw to the construction of a Student Health 
center, complete with staff and hospital, a temporary Student Union for cokes and smokes, classroom 
and office barracks to catch the overflow from buildings whose roots go deep into my soil. New 
courses were added, curriculums changed, experts brought to impart learning from their fields. 



Lights burned through long winter evenings in my halls and offices while faculty and administra- 
tors untangled the snarls incident to caring for more than seven thousand collegians. 



25 



I felt the weary tramp of faculty feet after hard hours before a blackboard or over lab tables. 
Urgent research projects were carried forward undsr their direction. I sat and contentedly watched 
them, well-pleased. They were pretty well-behaved. 

Of course, the government of the thousands who daily swarm over me is not left entirely in the 
hands of the faculty. The students have an effective self-government of their own. A Student Coun- 
cil largely regulates the off-campus lives of my men and women. (I use the words men and women 
advisedly. ) 

Maybe you'd like to know something about the system used by my faculty for school administra- 
tion. 

At the top are the governor, a legislature and a Board of Regents, many of whom I knew once as 
students walking along my paths. The chief man in residence responsible to these state officials is the 
President. Holding this position now is Milton S. Eisenhower. I have watched him grow and climb 
from the time he was a rambunctious fraternity pledge guarding the statue of William Alexander 
Harris till he became a national and international figure and the attractive though slightly balding 
man who guards the fates and destinies of the College. 

Advising the President Eisenhower are a whole host of administrative officials and a Council of 
Deans. The Deans are nearly all old friends of mine. I've seen most of them rise through the faculty 
ranks, make names for themselves in their respective fields, and become prominent authorities. 

Heads of departments hold authority over the sub-heads, associate professors, assistant professors, 
and lowest of all faculty members, the benighted instructors. 

These are the people who guide my fortunes. But, of course, I provide the firm foundation 
for their footsteps. I am the Hill on which they depend for support. 




26 




Profs Work Long Hours 



Many professors conduct some type of research in their hours free 
from teaching. A zoology prof shows just how the animal should be 
cut up (top). Two home economics instructors (center left), perform 
experiments on white rats that may mean better and cheaper eating 
for the American public. "Now you tell me what x is," says the 
mathematics teacher (center right), as he explains his equation. Clas- 
sifying rocks and minerals is a spare-time job of the geology professor 
at the left. 



27 



S P 6 Qwujel Ahead 




Registering upon arrival (center), stu- 
dents were assigned a cabin and given in- 
structions on meal times. It was not all 
work or planning. The camp provided 
swimming (right), boating, horseback rid- 
ing and archery. Following the conference, 
delegates returned to school for enrollment. 
In an all school assembly shortly after the 
beginning of the fall semester, SPC re- 
ports were delivered to the student body. 
More than half the recommendations of 
the group have been aproved by the ad- 
ministration. 




■ V "«**-S!ahi j 



9n Gamp, Wood PleScUocU Catt^eience 



The Student Planning Committee, off-spring of the Student Coun- 
cil, held its second pre-registration meeting at Camp Wood this year 
to help re-form and revitalize school policies and curriculums. Work- 



ing with faculty aid, the student committees made recomendations, 
many of which have been since enacted by the College administration. 
Each of the six sub-committees met individually. 




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One of the discussion groups meets 
(above). Nearly every campus organiza- 
tion sent a representative to the confer- 
ence. Camp Wood made an ideal location 
for the three day event. Students are 
shown (left) assembling for an evening 
meal. Discussion group chairmen were; 
Jim dinger, Dave Weatherbie, Intra- 
murals; Dick Winger, Mae Weaver, Social 
and Recreational; Nadine Smith, Dick 
Finegan, Political Action; Ralph Salis- 
bury, Public Relations; Loreta Stricklin, 
Dick Medlin, Student-faculty Relations; 
Deanne Dameron, Roy Harvey, Curricu- 
lum. 









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GOVERNOR FRANK CARLSON, of Kansas, a former K-State student, 
has long been active in state politics. He came to the campus several 
times this year as guest and speaker. 



JUNE, 1914, Governor Frank Carlson of Kansas re- 
ceived a Farmer's Short Course certificate in agri- 
culture, which was granted from this College. 

His farm is located in Cloud County near Concordia. 
As an active citizen of Kansas, he has been vitally 



Direct State Schools 

interested in the problems of the state and its people. 
He first served as congressman representing the Sixth 
Congressional District of Kansas, and now for several 
years as Governor of Kansas. 

The Board of Regents, which acts as the highest 
authority for the eight state-supported schools in Kan- 
sas is composed of nine members and the executive 
secretary. This year in cooperation with the Kansas 
Livestock Association, the Board of Regents passed 
their approval for a Pasture Utilization Project to be 
under the supervision of Kansas State College. 

Purchased Land 

This project included the purchase of the Donaldson 

ranch of approximately 1,143 acres near Manhattan, 
Kansas. It will be used for stock feeding experiments 
and pasture tests. 

The members of the Board of Regents are Fred M. 
Harris, Ottawa; Lester McCoy, Garden City; Oscar F. 
Stauffer, Topeka; Jerry Driscoll, Russell; Dr. LaVern 
B. Spake, Kansas City; Drew McLaughlin, chairman, 
Paola; Grover Poole, Manhattan; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Haughey, Concordia; W. M. Kelly, Hutchinson; and 
Hubert Brighton, Topeka, executive secretary. 

The Board of Regents is appointed by the Governor 
for a term of four years. 



THE BOARD OF REGENTS, headed by Willis Kelly of Hutchinson, has 
jurisdiction over the eight state-supported schools of Kansas. Members 
are (sitting left to right) F. M. Harris, Mrs. Elizabeth Haughey, Lester 
McCoy, Jerry Driscoll, Betty Reed, stenographer. (Standing, left to right) 



Hubert Brighton, secretary, Willis N. Kelly, Drew McLaughlin, Grover 
Poole, Dr. L. B. Spake, Oscar S. Stauffer. Margaret Hoover has re- 
placed Betty Reed as stenographer since the picture was taken. 




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PbedMeftJ Milton S. &ite*diawe/i. 



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A. L. PUGSLEY, Dean of Administration, handles much of administrative 
detail of the President's office, listens to problems of students and 
faculty alike. 




DEAN HAROLD HOWE, of 
the Graduate School, is a 
tax expert, as well as an 
authority on education. He 
heads the Faculty Commit- 
tee on Student Affairs. 





L. C. WILLIAMS, Deon and 
Director of the Kansas Ex- 
tension Service, took over 
his position following the 
retirement of Dean and Di- 
rector Emeritus H. Umber- 
ger last June. 



College Deans Direct 

'*T"'HE Deans of the College, highest ranking officials 
in their divisions, compose the Council of Deans, a 
largely legislative body. Most of the Deans have been 
with the school for a decade or more — some for a 
quarter of a century. They are directly responsible to 
the President for the activities of their divisions. 

A. L. Pugsley, Dean of Administration, is Director 
of the Summer School and Co-ordinator of Veterans' 
Affairs. He also represents the President in his absence. 
Dean Pugsley is a member of Blue Key, Scabbard and 
Blade, Delta Pi Chi, and Sigma Tau. 

Harold Howe, Dean of the Graduate School, is busy 
with school administration and with membership on 
many College committees. He is chairman of the Faculty 
Committee on Student Affairs, and a member of Phi 
Kappa Phi, Alpha Zeta, Gamma Sigma Delta, and Pi 
Kappa Delta. 

New Dean 

Only new Dean on the campus this year is L. C. 
Williams, Dean of Extension Service. He replaced 
Dean and Director Emeritus H. Umberger on June 30, 
1947. Dean Williams graduated from the College and 
has been connected with the extension service since 
1915. 

Rodney W. Babcock has had long experience in the 
administrative system at K-State. As head of the General 
Science Division, now the School of Arts and Sciences, 
he has served the College for 18 years. Dean Babcock 
is a member of Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Pi Delta 
Kappa, Gamma Alpha and Pi Mu Epsilon. 

Dr. R. R. Dykstra, Dean of the School of Veterinary 
Medicine, is a well-known figure both in his position 
with the College and in research. A member of Sigma 
Delta, Phi Kappa Phi and Sigma Xi, Dr. Dykstra has 
been at the College since 1917. 

A nationally known figure in the field of home 
management is Dr. Margaret Justin, Dean of the School 
of Home Economics. Graduated from the College in 
1909, Dean Justin is a prominent author of many pro- 
fessional articles and a member of Phi Kappa Phi, 
Omicron Nu, Sigma Xi, Iota Sigma Phi, Phi Upsilon 
Omicron. 



32 



Programs and Policies of Schools 



A NYTHING that pertains to the welfare of women 
students on the campus is the concern of the Dean 
of Women. Dean Helen Moore has efficiently dealt 
with problems that have arisen in this connection, from 
housing to regulation of college hours, since she came 
to K-State in 1940. Dean Moore is a member of Pi 
Lambda Theta and Mortar Board. 

Twenty-eight years ago, R. A. Seaton, Dean of the 
School of Engineering and Architecture, came to this 
College as head of the engineering division. Dean 
Seaton is Chairman of the Kansas State Board of Engi- 



neering Examiners, a Lamme Medalist, a fellow of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and a mem- 
ber of Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, and the American 
Society for Engineering Education. 

As a member of the ag faculty, head of the Depart- 
ment of Agronomy, and finally Dean of the School of 
Agriculture and Director of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, R. I. Throckmorton has been with the 
College for 37 years. Among the honorary societies 
of which he is a member are Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, 
Gamma Sigma Delta and Alpha Zeta. 



GOOD HUMOR and experience mark the character of Dean Rodney W. 
Babcock of the School of Arts and Sciences, (top left) Dr. R. R. Dykstra 
ftop center) of the School of Veterinary Medicine, has built a reputation 
for both himself and the School in his years with the College. Author 
and national figure in home ec is Dean Margaret Justin of the School of 
Home Economics, (fop right). 



Dean of Women, Miss Helen Moore, (bottom left) supervises and aids 
all College women in their living and problems. Outstanding in the 
field of engineering is Dean R. A. Seaton of the School of Engineering 
and Architecture, (bottom center). R. I. Throckmorton, Dean of the 
School of Agriculture, (bottom right) has served the College in various 
capacities for 37 years. 




33 




C. 0. PRICE (above), the President's right 
hand man, has been with the College for 28 
years. The office of College Comptroller, A. 
R. Jones (below) is the newest in the adminis- 
trative system. 





College Administrators Execute 



COME OF THE duties of the chief executive at Kansas State fall on 
C. O. Price when President Eisenhower is away on business trips. Mr. 
Price has been connected with the College for 28 years. Three College 
presidents have held office during Mr. Price's years on the campus. 

The office of College Comptroller is celebrating its second birthday 
this year. It is the newest office to be added to the Kansas State administra- 
tive system. A. R. Jones is the chief supervisor of the office. 

The Counseling Bureau under the direction of Dr. M. D. Woolf takes 
charge of freshman orientation week, the freshman advisory program and 
the Veterans Administration Council. Dr. Woolf recently completed 
a book called Faculty Advisors Handbook. 

Dr. F. D. Farrell, President Emeritus of the College, has completed his 
fourth Rural Institution Study and is now working on a study of rural 
churches in connection with rural community life. Dr. Farrell's research 
work is done in connection with the Experiment Station case studies of 
Kansas rural institutions. 

The biggest physical change during the past year was in the Student 
Health department, under the direction of Dr. R. R. Snook. Barracks were 
converted into a new hospital adding 15,000 square feet of floor space 
and enabling the College to operate a 60 bed hospital with an excellently 
equipped emergency room. The hospital staff numbered over 25. 



VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE and counseling, plus many other activities, fall into the hands of Dr. 
M. D. Woolf (lower left), head of the Counseling Bureau. Dr. F. D. Farrel (lower center) President 
Emeritus of the College is now working on case studies of Kansas rural institutions. The new, well- 
equipped student hospital is under the direction of Dr. R. R. Snook (lower right). 






34 



Policy, Keep Detailed Records 



This year the Office of the Registrar, with Miss Eleanor Tibbetts at 
the head, put into effect a streamlined method of keeping all student 
records. Each record is typed and kept in a specialized cardex file which 
eliminates the handwritten ink records kept in the old ledger books. 

Housing is the chief problem of the Veterans Service Bureau under the 
direction of Thornton Edwards. Through this department, married vet- 
erans and their familes or single men are provided with living accomo- 
dations. 

Kenny Ford, executive secretary of the Kansas State Alumni Associ- 
ation, this year was elected president of the Alumni Council. During his 
20 years as secretary, the office has compiled a complete alphabetical, 
bibliographical and geographical list of all alumni of Kansas State. Miss 
Bonnie Woods was added to the staff as assistant alumni secretary. 

Dr. J. T. Willard has served Kansas State in various administrative 
capacities for 69 years. Once Dean of Chemistry and Vice-President of 
the College, Dr. Willard has been College Historian for 1 1 years. He 
has written a history of Kansas State College. 

Dr. S. A. Nock, Director of Admissions, supervised the enrollment of 
nearly twice as many students in 1947-48, which is to be his last year 
with the College, as he did 12 years ago when he first became a member 
of the faculty. Dr. Nock is an outstanding author in the field of education. 



DR. S. A. NOCK, who is leaving the College this year, was Director of Admissions (lower left). 

College Historian, Dr. J. T. Willard (lower center), has been in executive positions of the College 

for 69 years. Kenny Ford, (lower right) executive secretary of the alumni office here, was elected 
this year as president of the Alumni Council. 






A NEW record system was put into effect this 
year by the Registrar, Eleanor Tibbetts (above,). 
K-State's housing worries are those of Thornton 
Edwards,Cbe/owJ, director of the Veterans Ser- 
vice Bureau. 





35 



Student Council Faces Vital Problems 



"XTEARLY every phase of student activity has been 
examined during the past year by the Student 
Council or one of its subcommittees. Dozens of projects 
were put into effect, recommendations made and in 
necessary cases, disciplinary action taken. 

The Student Council, as executive body of the 
Student Governing Association, is the highest student 
authority on the campus in matters of on-and-off the 
Hill affairs. Elected from their Schools to serve a 
term of one year from spring to spring, the Council 
members number nine. Schools are represented ac- 
cording to their enrollment. 

Advisory body to the Student Council is the Faculty 
Council on Student Affairs, composed of representative 
faculty members. Members of the Student Council sit 
on many administrative committees throughout the 
College, try to maintain close touch with student opin- 
ion and meet faculty suggestions. 

Several new projects were undertaken this year. The 
Student Planning Committee, an off-shoot of the Stu- 
dent Council, celebrated its first birthday with a pre- 



school conference at Camp Wood where reforms and 
additions in six areas of student life were discussed. 
Those areas are: political and student government ac- 
tivities, social and recreational activities, intramurals 
and athletics, curriculum orientation and enrollment 
procedures; public relations; and student-faculty rela- 
tions. 

Becoming affiliated with the National Students' 
Association — an organization which represents all col- 
lege students in the United States — was a major step 
for the Council. The N.S.A. works on a national scale 
to improve all phases of college life. 

The Council also took a membership for the student 
body in the Chamber of Commerce of Manhattan. The 
purpose of this move was to improve relationships 
between students and townspeople. Through this mem- 
bership, the group successfully backed a new city 
ordinance for sanitary regulations for restaurants and 
worked on recreational facilities and several other 
problems that jointly concern Manhattan and the stu- 
dents. 



STUDENT COUNCIL MEMBERS seriously discuss school problems at 
one of their regular Monday night meetings (below). From left to right 



they are Dick Fedell, Jack Woolsey, Ann Huddleston, Leonard Wood, 
Don Ford, Ward Keller, Phyllis Evans, Jane Engle, Dick Warren. 




36 



in SGA Administration 



Under the banner of one of its subcommittees, the 
Student Planning Committee, the Student Council 
helped sponsor the Love and Marriage Series, a new 
group of programs designed to meet the need for love 
and marriage education among college students. It was 
set up temporarily on the premise that if enough col- 
legians attended the series, a new course would be 
instituted beginning in the fall of 1948 to cover these 
subjects. With the advent of nearly every scheduled 
speaker, the auditorium was packed with K-Staters. 

The group helped to finance and prepare the Tem- 
porary Student Union and suggested program and 
policies for the Union. Run by the YMCA and the 
Student Union Committee, the building provided rec- 
reational facilities which were badly needed by the 
College. 

Other projects undertaken by the Council were 
the presentation of several programs and dances to 
introduce new students to Kansas State; the publication 
of the Student Directory and the K-Book; the super- 




DON FORD, Student Council prexy, proved industrious 
and progressive in his position as head of the entire 
student body, called the Student Governing Association. 



vision of the class officer and Student Council elections; 
the recommendation of students to be appointed to the 
President's All-College committees; the sponsorship of 
the Go-to-College teams which visited Kansas Towns to 
entice students to K-State. 



AMONG THE MANY PROJECTS undertaken by the Student Council was 
the sponsoring of the SGA Varsities in the Avalon. These dances were 



held nearly every weekend. Guys and gals danced to the music of the 
best college band in the country, Matt Betton, for a minimum in price. 




37 




The Organization and Control Board {top) co- 
ordinates the activities of all officially recog- 
nized student clubs and societies except social 
fraternities and sororities. Members this year 
are, left to right: James Lloyd; Barbara Engel- 
hardt; A. Thornton Edwards, chairman; Dr. E. 
E. Leasure; Miss Margaret Raffington. The 
Academic Dishonesty Committee (left center) 
was formed this year to handle cheating cases. 
Members are, left to right, Prof. Wilson Tripp, 
chairman; Virginia Eddy; Prof. Helen Hostet- 
ter; Elmer Blankenhagen; Dale Olson; Prof. 
George Wilcoxon. 



Gammitteeb /lie Actiuz 



(Top) — Controlling both policy and actual management of the new 
temporary Student Union are, left to right, committee members A. R. 
Jones, College comptroller; William West, manager; Jim Davis; Dean 
A. L. Pugsley; Murlin Hodgell; Mae Weaver; and Dick Winger, 
chairman. The all-important Apportionment Board (bottom) directs 
the spending of all student activity funds for such things as student 
publications, athletics, bands and student theatrical productions. This 
year's members, left to right, are Don Ford, chairman; Martha Beck- 
man; Dr. H. H. Haymaker; Prof. H. W. Davis; and Gabe Sellers. 



38 




FACULTY COUNCIL ON STUDENT AFFAIRS: Mrs. Gladys B. Gough, 
Dr. Robert A. Walker, Dr. Maurice Woolf, Dean Harold Howe, Dr. V. D. 
Foltz, Rufus Cox, Dr. E. E. Leasure, Thornton Edwards, Miss Margaret 



Raffington, Dean A. L. Pugsley, Dean Helen Moore, Tom Leathers, 
Collegian reporter. 



Council and Committees Advise Students 



/^OMPOSED of 12 representative faculty members, 
the Faculty Council on Student Affairs works in 
cooperation with the Student Council in deciding mat- 
ters of policy concerning the student body, and acts 
in a faculty advisory capacity to the Student Governing 
Association. 

Headed by Dean Harold Howe of the Graduate 
School, the council is also the controlling body of 
several all-school committees, including the Committee 
on Fraternities and Sororities, the Student Activity Fund 
Apportionment Board, the Organization Control Board, 
the Academic Dishonesty Committee, and the Tempor- 
ary Student Union Committee. These committees are 
composed of both student and faculty members, work- 
ing together to solve problems that come within their 
fields of control. 

Decisions of the Student Council are given the final 
O.K. by the Faculty Council in their regular meetings. 

The Committee on Fraternities and Sororities is made 
up of the men's and women's panhellenic and inter- 
fraternity advisers and a student. The Student Activ- 
ity Fund Apportionment Board, composed of three 
student and three faculty members, distributes the 



money to college organizations from the Student Ac- 
tivity Fund. The fund is received from a specified 
amount paid by each student with his fees as he enrolls. 
Through the years, the percentage received by each 
beneficiary is changed very little, in accordance with 
tradition and policy of the Board. The allotment may 
vary in normal times approximately as much as one 
per cent. 

The Organization Control Board, headed by Thorn- 
ton Edwards, is made up of two students and two 
faculty members. The Board keeps records of each 
campus organization, classifying them as departmental, 
honorary and professional, social and miscellaneous. 
Each organization must be recognized by the Control 
Board before it can take a full status as a College group. 

The Academic Dishonesty Committee, a new panel 
set up this year to handle cheating cases by students, 
has successfully dealt with several problems this year 
and enormously cut down the amount of academic 
dishonesty among the students. 

The Temporary Student Union Committee, having 
a large membership, directs and controls the plans and 
policies of the Student Union. 



39 




Milling majors gain practical experience in the mill owned and 
operated by the College. The only milling school in the country, 
and one of two in the world, it draws students from far-off countries, 



and from the wheat fields of Kansas. Three phases of milling industry 
are now taught which may prepare a student for research or the 
business world. 



40 



School of Agriculture 

A BUILDING addition was made in the School of 
Agriculture with the construction of the long- 
planned research laboratory for small animals. Other 
changes occurred in the faculty, research projects and 



grants. 



Enrollment in the School this year reached 1,246. 

Prof. George Montgomery was promoted from Pro- 
fessor of Economics to head of the Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics, succeeding Dr. W. E. Grimes, one 
of the best-known men on the campus, who died 
May 23, 1947. Dr. C. O. Swanson, Professor Emeritus 
of Milling Industry, died on January 5, 1948, after 
42 years' service at the College. 

When the Research and Marketing Act became 
effective July 1, 1947, it became possible for the 
Agricultural Experiment Station to set up 14 new 
research projects. Grants from commercial firms and 
research foundations amounting to $113,000 are finan- 
cing 43 research projects under the supervision of the 
Experiment Station. 

Fellowships or scholarships available for students in 
agriculture include the Borden Company Fellowship 
which provides for two scholarships in dairy husbandry. 





C. W. MULLEN, for 11 years Assistant Dean of the School of Agricul- 
ture, has long and faithfully served students enrolled in the curriculums 
in ag at Kansas State. He also works as assistant to Dean R. I. Throck- 
morton. 

The Carl Raymond Gray fund is given by the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company for 4-H members and Voca- 
tional Agriculture winners. Kroger Company and the 
Sears Roebuck scholarship provide funds for 15 fresh- 
men and one sophomore student. 



HFADS OF DEPARTMENTS 
OF THE SCHOOL OF AGRI- 
CULTURE— Top row: Dr. F. 
W. Atkinson, Dairy Hus- 
bandry; Prof. George Mont- 
gomery, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics; Dr. H. E. Myers, Agronomy; Dr. 
L. F. Payne, Poultry Husbandry. Bottom 
row: Dr. W. F. Pickett, Horticulture; Dr. 
J. A. Shellenberger, Milling Industry; Dr. 
A. D. Weber, Animal Husbandry. 




41 



In 1912, the Board of Regents created a new depart- 
ment at Kansas State College and called it the Division 
of Agriculture. July 1, 1942, the Division of Agri- 
culture was permitted to use the title of School of Agri- 
culture. 

This fall marks the eighty-fifth year since the first 
ag courses were taught at Kansas Sttae. The first dean 
of agriculture was apointed in 1908. R. I. Throck- 
morton, Dean of the School of Agriculture for the past 
two years, has been with the College for 37 years. And 
for the past 1 1 years C. W. Mullen has been Assistant 
Dean of Agriculture. 

The first State agricultural hall was built in 1900 
and a dairy building was added to the agriculture plant 
in 1904. Education Hall was the home of Kansas State 
agriculture for many years before Waters Hall was built 
in 1912. Waters is named for Henry Jackson Waters, 
the sixth president of the College. 

Nationally Recognized 

The School of Agriculture has become nationally 
recognized for the work done in various agrciultural 
fields. Judging teams representing different depart- 
ments of the College have consistently won honors in 
all sections of the United States. 



The College owns several hundred acres of land 
which is used for experimental work and practical 
application of theories. 

The only College in the United States to offer a 
degree in milling, Kansas State's Department of Mill- 
ing Industry is supervised by Prof. J. A. Shellenberger. 

The School of Agriculture has established a special 
two-year vocational training program, and set up a 
refresher course to meet the needs of the returned war 
veterans. 

Department Division 

The actual administration of the School of Agri- 
culture is divided into seven departments representing 
almost every phase of agrarian operations. In addition 
to their major field of work, students in agriculture may 
choose electives in animal husbandry, agricultural eco- 
nomics, soils crops, dairy husbandry, horticulture, mill- 
ing and poultry husbandry. 

Several of the technical societies to which Dean R. 
I. Throckmorton and various faculty members belong 
are the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, American Society of Agronomy, Soil Science 
Society of America, and Kansas Academy of Science. 



CHARTS AND GRAPHS occupy the attention of students of agriculture economy 
(lower left). Heads are bent, answers compared, in this course, which appears 
to be no snap. Built in 1912, East Ag, or to be technically correct, the east 
wing of Waters Hall, has served for years as classroom and lab space for the 
ags. 




42 




Ags spend much of their time in labs covering all fields 
from sheep shearing to flower cutting. (Top) dairy students 
pack bricks of ice cream as the final process is completed. 
Flower arrangement is studied and practiced in the flori- 
culture course (center left). The stock pavilion between the 
two wings of Waters Hall is the scene for sheep judging by 
animal husbandry students (center left). The fine points 
of butter churning are demonstrated to some ags as the 
golden load is removed from the vat (bottom). 



43 




Although Kansas State is basically a technical school, the arts are 
rapidly coming into their own with well-developed fields of study. 



Above a student of organ shows off the result of a week of practice. 
Organ students get plenty of leg work. 



44 



Arts and Sciences 

QECOND only to the School of Engineering and 
Architecture, Arts and Sciences hit the all-time high 
of 2,329 students this fall. This was approximately 
one-third of the total enrollment of the College. 

Kansas State, as a land grant school, supplies cur- 
riculums in the sciences and in professional and voca- 
tional subjects rather than classical studies. 

And so, it is the main objective in the School of 
Arts and Sciences, to give this basic scientific and 
cultural training. 

Office of the Dean 

Rodney W. Babcock is Dean of the School of Arts 
and Sciences. He is aided by R. C. Maloney, holding 
the position of Assistant Dean. Dean Maloney is 
beset with such problems as constantly re-arranged 
schedules in the hands of students, chem labs cut in 
favor of Canteen labs, why you lack three hours to 
graduate, and all the book work involved in keeping 
track of the scholastic records of 2,329 students. 

Among the many faculty changes throughout the 
School was the addition of Chester E. Peters who acts 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS— Top row: Dr. D. J. Ameel, Zo- 
ology; William Baehr, Library; Dr. H. Leigh Baker, Education and 
Psychology; Dr. A. B. Cardwell, Physics; Prof. H. W. Davis, English. 




R. C. MALONEY, Assistant Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, 
is recognized as a problem-solver by most students enrolled in this 
School. He ably assists Dean R. W. Babcock in the administrative work 
of the division. 

as Assistant to the Dean of the School of Arts and 
Sciences. Mr. Peters is a graduate of Kansas State. 

Bottom row: Dr. P. L. Gainey, Bacteriology; Prof. Katherine Geyer, 
Physical Education for Women; Dr. Howard T. Hill, Speech; Col. 
A. G. Hutchinson, Military Science; Dr. H. H. King, Chemistry. 




45 







HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS— Top row: Prof. Ralph Lashbrook, 
Industrial Journalism and Printing; Prof. L. O. Leavengood, Music; 
Prof. Thurlo McCrady, Physical Education for Men; Dr. L. E. Mel- 
chers, Botany and Plant Pathology; Prof. George Montgomery, Eco- 



nomics and Sociology. Bottom row: Dr. Fritz Moore, Modern Lan- 
guages; Dr. F. L. Parrish, History and Government; Dr. R. G. Sanger, 
Mathematics; Dr. Roger C. Smith, Entomology; Prof. A. B. Sperry, 
Geology; Dr. Robert Walker, Citizenship Education. 



! ~"\EATH claimed several professors in the School 

this year. The faculty, as well as the students, 

miss the capable leadership and qualities of Dr. Waldo 

E. Grimes, who was head of the Department of Eco- 
nomics and Sociology; B. L. Remick, retired head of 
the Department of Mathematics; L. E. Hudiburg, Assis- 
tant Dean in the School of Arts and Sciences and 
teacher in the physics department; Prof. C. R. Thomp- 
son, of the economics and sociology department; and 
finally that grand old figure in Kansas State sports, M. 

F. "Mike" Ahearn, retired head of the athletics depart- 
ment. 

Thurlo E. McCrady replaced Hobbs Adams as Direc- 
tor of Athletics on March 1, 1947. With the resigna- 
tion of Sam Francis as football coach after Kansas 
State's most disastrous gridiron season, came the ap- 
pointment of Ralph Graham as head mentor of the 
'48 squad. Graham is a former Wildcat football star, 
and came back to his Alma Mater after several years 
of successful coaching at Wichita University. 

Montgomery to Head 

Prof. George Montgomery was named head of the 



Department of Economics and Sociology, succeeding 
Dr. Grimes. 

A course in Applied Geology, to be offered next 
fall, is the only curriculum change to take place within 
the School during the year. 

Building additions were made to the division in the 
form of four barracks located east of Willard Hall 
and north of the green houses. Two of the double- 
story surplus Army Barracks are occupied by the 
offices of instructors in the School, and the two with 
only one floor are used for classroom purposes. 

Research Done 

Research work in the School of Arts and Sciences 
is carried on in cooperation with the School of Agri- 
culture. During the past year, many research projects 
have been developed in connection with the two 
Schools. 

As the post-war College returned to normalcy, aca- 
demic and extra-curricular activities were in full swing. 
Organizations came to life with more vigor than ever 
before. 



46 




A wide range of courses, from History of Religion to Hematology is 
taught in the School of Arts and Sciences. A recitation class in Biology 
in Relation to Man goes to Fairchild Museum to inspect the shells of 
sea animals they have been studying (top). A student in a medical 
technician's course in pathology injects a dose while the class awaits 
the effect (center left). Assistant to the Dean of Arts and Sciences, 
Chester Peters, discusses a student's curriculum problems with him 
(center right). Anderson Hall was covered with snow most of the 
long cold winter (bottom). 










47 




Individual instruction is given to art students in the School of Engi- 
neering and Architecture. Careful consideration is shown to each 



student's effort, whether he has outstanding talent or not. Varied 
mediums are used in the art classes. 



48 



Engineering, Architecture 



"A /TORE thorough and intensified courses were given 
this year to all students in the School of Engineer- 
ing and Architecture. The architecture curriculum was 
lengthened from four to five years for students to be 
graduated in 1952. The degree will become Bachelor 
of Science in Architecture, as differentiated from the 
former degree given in engineering. 

From now on, there will be more work in electronics 
for the electrical engineer and more electrical engineer- 
ing for the chemical engineer. 

There were 17 promotions among the instructors of 
the division during the past year. Prof. Reed F. Morse 
replaced Prof. L. E. Conrad as head of the civil engi- 
neering department. Prof. W. H. Honstead took the 
place of Prof. Frederick Rohrman as head of the Depart- 
ment of Chemical Engineering. 

The entire school mourned the death of Albert J. 
Mack, a favorite professor in the mechanical engineer- 
ing department. Professor Mack died October 25, while 
watching a football game in the Memorial stadium. 

Enrollment Jumps 

From an enrollment of 350 in 1913, the School of 
Engineering and Architecture has increased to 2,668. 
This is two and a quarter times as large as the previous 
maximum in the history of the College prior to last 
year. In the current year, more than 300 degrees will 
be conferred in this School. 

After World War I, the enrollment rose rapidly 
until it reached about a thousand in 1925-26. There- 
after, it fluctuated between 100 and 1200 until 1941. 




M. A. (COTTON) DURLAND, Assistant Dean of the School 
of Engineering and Architecture, has been connected with the 
College for a quarter of a century. He handles much of the 
administrative load for the largest School on the campus. 



About 150 Bachelor of Science degrees and five Master 
of Science degrees were then conferred annually. 

During the war, the enrollment in the School drop- 
ped to a low point of fewer than 200. With the end 
of the war and the influx of veterans, it rebounded 
sharply to reach a new all-time high which was approxi- 
mately fourteen times as great as two years before. 

A surplus Army airplane hanger was erected north 
of the military science building. This will be used as 
an aeronautical laboratory, drafting and office room, 
and storage for surplus planes. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OF THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND 
ARCHITECTURE— Prof. F. C Fenton, Agricultural Engineering; R. F. 
Gingrich, Building and Repair; Prof. Linn Helander, Mechanical Engi- 



neering; L. S. Hobson, Engineering Experiment Station; Prof. W. H. Hon- 
stead, Chemical Engineering. 




49 




HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OF THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND 
ARCHITECTURE— Prof. R. G. Kloeffler, Electricol Engineering; Prof. R. 
F. Morse, Civil Engineering; Prof. C. E. Pearce, Machine Design; Prof. 

Another project is the study of gravel and stone 
available in the Missouri River Valley to find suitable 
concrete aggregates for the Missouri River basin pro- 
jects. 

The use of electric welders on farms, heat pump 
methods applicable to farm home heating and cooling, 
and drying of chopped hay by forced ventilation are 
among the other research projects in the School of 
Engineering and Architecture. 

During the past year, Dr. Gerald Pickett of the 
Department of Applied Mechanics was awarded the 
Wason Medal by the American Concrete Institute for 
the most meritorious paper of 1946 in the field of con- 
crete research. 

Cooperating with the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, the agricultural engineering department is study- 
ing various methods of applying water to crops for 
supplementary irrigation and the effect these methods 







THE ENGINEERING building (above), with smokestacks point- 
ing upward, stares across the grassy slope which is at its south 
entrance. Gerald C. Kolsky, (far right) new Assistant to the 
Dean of Engineering and Architecture, takes the horns of a 
student's dilemma. 



C. H. Scholer, Applied Mechanics; Prof. G. A. Sellers, Shop Practice; 
Prof. Paul Weigel, Architecture. 



would have on the yield. 

Study Erosion 

Another important project under way, is a study of 
the wind erosion of the soil and the mechanical prob- 
lems and factors involved. This includes research on 
the effect of varying wind velocity, moisture content, 
and other factors which affect soil blowing. 

Scholarships and fellowships available to engineering 
students are the Westinghouse scholarship in electrical 
engineering; the Lincoln Arc Welding scholarship in 
agricultural engineering; and the Consolidated-Vultee 
fellowship in mechanical engineering. 

Engineering instruction at Kansas State began very 
early in the College's history. The act of Congress under 
which the College was established provided for the 
teaching of "such branches of learning as are related 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts." 

In the early years, the instruction in engineering 
grew slowly, as did the College as a whole. Separate 
four-year curriculums were established as follows: 
engineering in 1897; electrical engineering and 
mechanical engineering in 1907; agricultural engi- 
neering in 1925. 




so 




Mechanical engineers pry curiously into the workings of levers, 
wheels and pulleys (top). Experiments in electrical engineering labs 
draw the absorbed interest of every loyal EE (center left). 

If the new field house is not yet life-size, it has at least been con- 
structed by architecture students, now putting the finishing touches 
on the landscaping (center right). Shavings fly as an industrial arts 
student labors over a lathe to produce a fine piece of wood work. 



51 




The most modern equipment is given 
to home economics students in their 
classes in Calvin Hall, at left. Shown 
above are home ec'ers trying out the 
testing machine in a textiles class. 



52 



School of Home Economics 

T^OR three-quarters of a century, courses in home 
economics have been offered at Kansas State. From 
one instructor, (who taught sewing, dressmaking and 
millinery; the school of Home Economics has grown 
to include seven departments, with more than 60 faculty 
members. 

There are two objectives in training students enrolled 
in the School of Home Economics. The first is to help 
a woman become a better citizen and housewife through 
her general education in this division. Over 90 per- 
cent of the home ec graduates marry within five years 
after leaving school. Therefore, the instructors believe 
that the practical side of the field should be emphasized. 

The second objective is to equip a student for the 
highly specialized and technical fields opened to gradu- 
ates in home economics today. 



Meet Varied Needs 

Graduate and undergraduate courses are offered to 
meet the needs of those who plan to care for a home, 
those who wish to teach, engage in social welfare, enter 
some aspect of the business field, engage in dietetics or 
institutional management, become nurses or techni- 
cians, and those who wish to prepare for graduate 
study in phases of home economics. 

Many students who feel sure their interest is in home 
economics, are at a loss on entering college, to know 
which curriculum to choose. Hence, guidance plans 
are included in the home economics program to help 
the student determine the special phase in which her 
individual interests and abilities may best function. 




DR. MARTHA KRAMER, Assistant Dean of Home Economics, 
helps solve student curriculum problems and aids with the 
administration of the School, among her other duties. She has 
been with the College for 18 years. 



Dr. Lois R. Schulz is the new head of the Depart- 
ment of Child Welfare and Euthenics. Assistant pro- 
fessors added to the Department of Foods and Nutri- 
tion were Dr. Dorothy Harrison and Miss Dorothy 
Linn. 

Enrollment in the School of Home Economics last 
fall reached approximately 667 students. 

Extension plans include two home management 
houses, a duplex, and a single dwelling. New furnish- 
ings and equipment are ready for students and faculty 
who will occupy these houses in the fall of '48. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OF THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS— 
Miss Dorothy Barfoot, Art; Dr. Josephine Kremer, Household Economics; 
Miss Alpha Latzke, Clothing and Textiles; Dr. Lois Schulz, Child Welfare 



and Euthenics; Dr. Gladys Vail, Foods and Nutrition; Mrs. Bessie B. 
West, Institutional Management. 




S3 




THE FINE POINTS of salad-making are being demonstrated to a foods 
class. Each group prepares a different type of salad and brings it before 

Many important research projects are being con- 
ducted in the School of Home Economics. Dr. Beulah 
Westerman is directing research on the nutritional 
significance of the use of enriched cereals. This was 
made possible by a grant of $7,000 from the Williams- 
Waterman Fund of the Research Corporation of New 
York. 

Dr. Leah Ascham is cooperating with the horticulture 
and physics departments on a project designed to study 
the effect of electromagnetic radiation on the absorbic 
acid content of plants. 

Dr. Abby Marlatt is working in association with 
Iowa Sttae College and Ohio State University on the 
project: "Nutritional Status of School Children as In- 
fluenced by the School Lunch Program." 

Several of the research activities being done by Dr. 
Gladys Vail are the performance of eggs and egg pro- 
ducts and their use in foods; the effect of frozen storage 
temperatures upon certain charcteristics of meat; the 



the class for approval or criticism. Such experiments may free future 
husbands of guinea-pig status. 

effect of freezing and refrigerated storage on the qual- 
ity of pre-cooked foods. 

Honorary President 

Miss Alpha Latzke was installed in June as national 
president of Omicron Nu to serve a term of two years. 

Home Ec students will find that there are several 
scholarships open to them. Among these are the Sears- 
Roebuck Foundation home economics scholarships, the 
Kroger scholarship fund for home economics students 
and the Jessie Hoover Fellowship for graduate students. 

This year marks the third of Dr. Martha Kramer's 
administration as Assistant Dean of Home Economics. 
She has been at K-State for 18 years. Dr. Kramer 
belongs to Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Nu and Sigma Xi 
honorary societies. 

Dr. Margaret M. Justin, Dean of the School of 
Home Economics is one of the nation's outstanding 
authorities of her field. She has written many home ec 
books and is a well-known speaker. 



54 



A beginning foods class learns the use 
of double boilers and how hundreds of 
salads can be made with just lettuce 
and tomatoes (left). 




Preparing food for the masses of hungry students that descend upon 
the College Cafeteria at meal hours is part of the class work in a 
course teaching cooking of large quantities of food. Some members 
of a class are shown working at the right. 



Those who wish to teach home eco- 
nomics upon graduation are given 
plenty of practical experience in either 
the Manhattan school system or that of 
a nearby community. At the left, a 
student teacher at the Manhatan High 
School, shows the class just how the 
dress should be fitted. 



55 




On the operating table, vets hold examples of the range in sizes 
with which the small animal part of the hospital deals (above). A 
complete supply of pharmaceutical products is kept and used by the 
School in the hospital (left). 



5b 



School of Veterinary Medicine 



"\ /fANY changes in the curriculum of the School of 
Veterinary Medicine during the past year mark 
the passage from accelerated war-time schedules to a 
non-accelerated peace-time basis. Because of these curri- 
culum changes, there are no fourth year students in 
veterinary medicine for the 1947-48 college year. 

R. R. Dykstra, Dean of the School of Veterinary 
Medicine since 1919, is completing his twenty-ninth 
year at Kansas State College. Assistant to the Dean 
of Veterinary Medicine is Mrs. Maxine Caley. 

Two hundred and two students are enrolled in the 
professional curriculum of Veterinary Medicine this 
year. Kansas State College can boast of having one 
of the 10 college schools of Veterinary Medicine in 
the country. The enrollment is limited to approximately 
200 students by the Board of Regents, making com- 
petition very great in this particular field. A grade 
average of 2.5 was required for enrollment this year. 

More Time Required 

Effective September 1, 1948, the completion of two 
years of preveterinary work will be required in order 
to receive consideration for admission to the profes- 
sional curriculum of vet medicine. These two years 
of preveterinary work and the additional four years 
in the professional curriculum lead to the two degrees 
of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Veterinary Medi- 
cine. 




VETERINARY HALL, above, with the Vet Hospital, is the building in 
which most of the senior and junior vets take their classes. The Office 
of the Dean and other administrative offices of the School are located 
here also. 



Among the changes in the staff of the Veterinarian 
School this year were resignations of Asst. Prof. F. H. 
Oberst and Assoc. Prof. W. W. Thompson from the 
staff of the Department of Pathology. Dr. J. W. Lumb 
is now Asosciate Professor in the anatomy department. 

The National Cancer Institute, subdivision of the 
United States Public Health Service, has notified the 
School of Veterinary Medicine that the National Ad- 
visory Cancer Council has recommended a grant of 
$1,000 to be used for the project, "A Study of Biolog- 
ical Tests of Malignancy." 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OF 
THE SCHOOL OF VETERINARY 
MEDICINE— Dr. E. J. Frick, Sur- 
gery and Medicine; Dr. E. E. Lea- 
sure, Physiology; Dr. L. M. Roder- 
ick, Pathology; Dr. W. M. McLeod, 
Anatomy. 




57 




COUNTING VERTEBRAE on an animal skeleton, is an enjoyable task 
apparently to vet students who sit in a lab in the traditional white 



A curriculum leading to the degree Doctor of Veter- 
inary Medicine was established in Kansas State College 
in 1905. The first class received their degrees in 1917. 
Doctors of Veterinary Medicine graduated fro K-State, 
including all classes from 1907 up to the present time, 
total 1,118. 

A $300 award is given by the Borden Company 
Foundation to the senior student having the highest 
grades in the courses of the first three years of the 
professional curriculum in veterinary medicine. 

Research Projects 

Among the research projects now being carried on 
in the School of Veterinary Medicine are the studies 
of Brucellosis of Cattle; Malignancy Tests for Cancer 
and Other Tumors; Research of Anaplasmosis of Cattle; 
Disease of Feeder Cattle in Kansas; the study of Virus 
diseases of animals; and other experimental work con- 
cerning miscellaneous animal diseases. 

In addition to teaching professional veterinary medi- 
cine in the "School of Bone-Cutting" there is research 



coveralls of the College vets. Struggling vet students claim horses have 
more parts than a television set. 



work done by the Department in cooperation with the 
Agricultural Experiment Sation. 

Develop Vaccines 

The department has to its credit much outstanding 
research. Listed among the most outstanding of its 
projects is the development of modern blackleg vac- 
cines. The blackleg projects were started many years 
ago and are resulting in an annual estimated saving of 
nine per cent of the total calf crop in the entire south- 
west. 

Patients in the Veterinary Clinic include all domes- 
tic animals ranging from horses to poultry. The depart- 
ment operated Clinic provides instruction and practice 
in the courses such as obstetrics, surgery and infectious 
disease. The Clinic is a non-profit organization, treat- 
ing animals brought from surrounding farms and 
homes in Riley county and throughout the state, 

Kansas students receive precedence over out-of-state 
students in enrolling. There are several foreign students 
enrolled, who will carry their Kansas State degrees to 
their home countries in nearly every continent. 



58 




It takes strength as well as skill to 
de-horn cattle, as is demonstrated 
(above) by Dr. E. R. Frank of the 
surgery and medicine department. 
(Lower left) A vet student holds a 
well-groomed horse in show position 
for the camera. 



59 



The Kansas Extension Service 
goes to farm communities 
throughout the state by means 
of the central offices on the 
campus and district and county 
offices. Another service is per- 
formed for students and citi- 
zens through the Home Study 
Program, part of the staff of 
which is shown at the left. 




Extension publicity and records 
require the help of numerous 
clerks, typists and stenographers. 
Thousands of mimeographed 
bulletins are sent out over the 
state from the office shown at 
left. 



60 



Extension Moves to New Central Offices 



"C'OR THE first time in many years, 1947 brought 
together in one building all central office extension 
workers. The new temporary quarters are located mid- 
way between Military Science and West Waters Hall. 
The only facilities of the Extension Service that are 
not located in this building are the publications unit, 
housed in the basement of Anderson, and the studios of 
Station KSAC, on the third floor of the gym. 

The Department of Home Study Service had an en- 
rollment of 2,155 students who were taking credit 
courses. 

One outstanding development in physical properties 
was the installaion of a new 5,000 watt radio trans- 
mitter with the 433 foot vertical tower, two miles due 
north of the campus. From the viewpoint of service 
to Kansas people, the new broadcasting equipment has 
increased the potential listening audience from 1,300,- 
000 to 5,000,000 persons. Letters received from listen- 
ers, not only in Kansas, but from points throughout the 
Middle West, show the tremendous increase. 



Umberger Retires 

Until June 30, 1947, H. Umberger had been Dean 
and Director of the Kansas Extension Service, serving 
for more than a quarter of century. On that date, he 
relinquished his activities to become Dean and Director 
Emeritus. Professor L. C. Williams, a graduate of the 
College came to the extension service in 1915. Follow- 
ing the appointment of Dean Umberger on an Emeritus 
status, Professor Williams became Dean of the Division 
of Extension and Director of Kansas Extension service. 

The state is the College campus through the exten- 
sion service. 

The primary objective of the service is to assist the 
rural people of the state in developing and conducting 
educational programs in which all may participate. All 
programs have as their major goals better living con- 
ditions and happier, more satisfying lives. These objec- 
tives are gained by the close individual contact that the 
Extension Service keeps with the residents of the rural 
communities. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OR THE KANSAS EXTENSION 
SERVICE — Top row: Harry Baird, District Agent; Frank Blecha, 
Farm Labor; John Ferguson, Extension Engineering; George Gen> 
mell, Home Study; O. B. Glover, District Agent. Bottom row: Paul 



W. Griffith, Agricultural Specialist; J. Harold Johnson, State 4-H 
Clubs; L. L. Longsdorf, Extension Publicity; Georgianna Smurthwaite, 
Home Economics; E. H. Teagarden, District Agent. 




61 



Graduate School Changes Program 




FOR A HIGHER DEGREE, these students work long hours in the graduate 
lab, a special room in Fairchild Hall. Courses leading to a master's are 



offered by 42 College departments. A Doctor of Philosophy degree may 
be obtained in nine fields here. 



62 






To Meet New Needs 

"PREPARING students for jobs in industry requiring 
highly technical skills is now recognized as the 
function of the Graduate School. Educational and 
research positions are now calling for preparation only 
received by those with considerable graduate training. 

In lieu of these facts, the School has changed its 
program to meet the present-day needs of graduate 
students. Work leading to a Master of Science degree 
is offered by 42 departments at the College. The 
degree, Doctor of Philosophy, is offered in nine fields. 

This year, there were 315 students enrolled in the 
Graduate School, with approximately 40 seniors taking 
some graduate work. 

All graduate students may belong to the Graduate 
Club, of which Dean Harold Howe is sponsor. The 
chief activities of the club are social, and wives and 
husbands of graduate students may be associate mem- 
bers. 

Officers of the club this year were James Hoath, 
president; Emilio Viale, vice-president; and Wilma 
Anderson, secretary-treasurer. 

Supervisory Body 

The Graduate Council is comparabl eto the Coun- 
cil of Deans in its function, in that it is an over-all 
supervisory body. Composed of faculty representatives 



GRADUATE CLUB— Back row: Louise Ellison, Wilma Anderson, 
Vlasta Holsan, Helen Penner, Hazel Molzer, Grace Hochmuth, Frank 
E. White, Robert E. Harrison, Betty J. Drayer, Helen Fields, Mary Lou 
Markley, Jerome Hill. Fifth row: Clova M. Mays, Leonard Redlinger, 
Durward Danielson, Martha Caldwell, Alice Graham, J. J. Woods, 
Allis Keith, D. J. Albritton, Harold Rife, Daniel Lingelbach, Virginia 
Smith, Edith Buchholtz, Ruth Kindred. Fourth row: Inez Loyd, 
Eleanor Hardin, Phillip Lyness, James Kring, Andrew Jackson, 
Woodrow Franklin, Elton Cook, El Sayed M. H. Gaafar, Almon S. 
Fish, Jr., Harold A. Westberg, H. A. Hoffman, Jean Hummel, Vir- 




THE GRADUATE COUNCIL formulates graduate study policy for the 
School. From left to right the members are Dean Harold Howe, Dr. Reed 
F. Morse, Dr. Fred Parrish, Dr. H. N. Barham, Miss Florence McKinney, 
Dr. R. A. Walker and Dr. M. C. Moggie. Members of Council not in 
picture are Dr. L. D. Bushnell, Dr. H. E. Myers and Dr. L. M. Roderick. 

from the various undergraduate schools and depart- 
ments, the Graduate Council fashions the program of 
the Graduate School and formulates the graduate study 
policy for the College. 

Harold Howe has been Dean of the Graduate School 
since 1945. Prior to that time, he was a professor in 
the Department of Economics and Sociology. For 23 
years, his name has been prominent in the field of 
economics. Dean Howe participates in numerous stu- 
dent activities. Not only does he supervise the Graduate 
School, but as chairman of the Faculty Council on 
Student Affairs, he oversees the five subcommittees of 
that group. Departments offering major work for the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees are Bacteriology, oBtany, 
Chemistry, Entomology, Plant Genetics, Poultry Gene- 
tics, Milling Industry and Parasitology. 

ginia Trotter. Third row: Ralph A. Loyd, John Funk, James Horth, 
Cuauhtemoc Salazar, Stephen Loska, Mario Dirks, R. B. Parker, H. D. 
Cook, Melville Mudge, Sheu-Shan Kwong, Leon Lungstrom, C. L. 
Ellison. Second row: Ruth Wells, Ramon Jaranilla, James G. Walker, 
Helen Bomgardner, Alma Giles, Emilio Viale, Cora Blackwill, Pe-Sin 
Su, Yen Ting Kwong, Margaret Haines, Harriett Harlin. Front row: 
Ching F. Pun, Honor C. Pledger, Olga W. Bays, Cleone Campbell, 
Lucy Bugel, Irene Raembach, Alberta Reitze, Ann Dueser, Ann Kohler, 
Jean Olliver, Cynthia Cannon, Herbert O. L. Singer. 




63 




i/^4-^ 



N 



EVER, in all the time I've been a Hill, have I held up so many organizations. There are over 
100 clubs recognized by the Organization Control Board. And what they all find to do I don't 
know. 



People trample in herds to five o'clock meetings, and just when I've settled down for the night, 
thy shuffle back all over me for after-dinner meetings. I get battered. 

Take a tip from an old Hill — if you want to be what they call a wheel on the campus — if you 
want to walk to West Ag exchanging greetings with fellow students and faculty members — if you 
want to enter the Union or the Canteen and immediately spot someone to have a cup of coffee with 
— the solution is simple. Just join five or six campus organizations. 

At least one of the hundred clubs should catch your fancy. There is an organization for every field 
that the human mind can grasp, from the Guild of Gabby Golfers to the Society for the Preservation 
of Monoliths on the Kansas State College Campus. If you fancy a particularly popular line, there are 
probably several groups which would welcome you as a member. Let me remind you, that this is quite 
new to me — it wasn't so very many years ago that the members of one literary society wouldn't speak 
to those who belonged to the other literary society. Clubs were very exclusive, membership select. 
Now the most important qualification for membership is an active interest in the group and a willing- 
ness to support its projects. 

Since the war, my groups have had huge increases in membership. Nearly every club has 
doubled all previous records. This enlarges, not only the amount of dues collected, but the amount 



65 



of knowledge that can be derived from a departmental or curricular group. Larger numbers permit 
the extension of the clubs' activities. 

The organizations generally meet after the classrooms have closed their scarred doors. Faculty 
sponsors are inevitably on hand to guide the club through its extra-curricular endeavors. Some groups 
take inspection trips, some listen to speakers from industrial fields, some hold discussions, and 
nearly all have fall hayrack rides, and a picnic for members and dates in the spring. If you're lucky, 
you mayget a Christmas hot tamale supper. 

As might be expected, some of the organizations at Kansas State are very old — some are very 
new. The old ones have nice traditions, like a candlelight breakfast early on May Day. The new 
ones keep pretty busy being worthwhile, getting members, and collecting dues. 

Some clubs have reached the efficiency of a well-oiled machine. Others are just getting their start. 
On the latter, you can play a part in moulding policies, gaining favorable publicity, and all the other 
odd iobs that confront those who would pioneer. 

Every organization, large or small, young or old, has its officers. Officers, you know — those seri- 
ous-looking people who tell everyone what to do, how to do it, and when. Those people you think 
you can rise above — until you finally get the job. You can show your friends, enemies and instruc- 
tors that you have "leadership" and that you haven't been over-rating yourself all these years. 

Just think how important you'll feel when you can say to those poor dopes who spend all their 
time loafing that you have a meeting, and much as you'd like to stay and chat awhile, you must be 
prompt. 

That's the way to be a wheel. I know. Wheels roll all over this old Hill — and they're not all 

circular. 




66 




Kansas UNESCO brass meets at a luncheon on the campus 
in December (above). In the back row, from left to right 
are F. B. Schlagle, Superintendent of Schools in Kansas 
City, Kans., and a member of the executive UNESCO 
board; Dr. Emry Luccock; Bert A. Hedges of the Kansas 
Commission for UNESCO; Rees H. Hughes, President of 
the Kansas State Teachers College at Pittsburg and a mem- 
ber of the executive board; and F. E. Black, Kansas execu- 
tive of the American Federation of Labor. In the front row 
are Milton S. Eisenhower, President of the College and a 
national UNESCO figure; Dr. Robert A. Walker, head of 
the Institute of Citizenship on the campus and executive 
secretary of Kansas UNESCO; Robert Stanforth, Assistant 
Director of the Commission for International Education; 
and Helen Peterson, of the UNESCO office at the College. 



9nteled.l o£ Matty 
Studetttl 



The overseas unit of the Kansas State College UNESCO 
group found great interest among the student body in 
their plans for trips to Europe in the summer. Every 
campus organization sent a representative to the mass 
meeting of the branch of the United Nations Educational, 
Scientific, and Cultural Organization, above. Delegates 
from the entire state attended the UNESCO convention in 
Wichita in the winter. Shown at right is the evening 
banquet which closed the meetings. 




67 




Union Draws Crowds 



Through summer months and late into the fall, 
work progressed on the temporary Student Union 
building, a reconverted Army Barracks. At last, in 
November, it opened, and students piled in for a 
cup of coffee and a chat (upper left). Carpenters 
and electricians worked through the summer on the 
interior of the Union (center left). Dean Pugsley 
and Student Council prexy, Don Ford, gave the 
Union a send-off at its formal opening (center right). 
(Lower right) the way the building looked to thirsty 
students early in the fall. 




The last session of the International Security Assembly (top left) before 
it became defunct last spring showed some of the color and vigor it 
had possessed before its place was taken by UNESCO. During Wild- 
cat Day last spring, the Chapajaros club sponsored a rodeo, Above, is 
the royalty of the festivities. Queen, on horse, is Irene Gehrke, stand- 
ing from left to right are Thelma Stous and Nora Savage. 



QtoMpA. <M-ald tye^UviUei, 



The annual Golddiggers Ball sponsored by the Purple 
Pepsters brought out the usual number of dancing 
couples and weird corsages. At left, corsage winners 
are shown receiving prizes. King of Pep presented 
during evening was Bob Dunlap, Pi Kappa Alpha. 
Cosmopolitan Club members hold their annual Feast 
of Nations dinner, with members from dozens of 
foreign lands wearing native costumes and contributing 
exotic food (bottom). 





% 


nomics 


Y 





jbulinty <Jta4,futalltu 2>a^d 

The week after the Easter Parade last spring came the 
Hospitality Days style review (above). The clothes pictured 
here are the result of tailoring classes, garment work and 
special projects. April 18 and 19 marked the seventeenth an- 
nual Hospitality Days sponsored by the School of Home Eco- 



Demonstration of crafts (center), and painting 
(right) were events that drew much of the crowd 
during open house. Home economics high school 
students and teachers from all parts of the state 
come annually to visit the displays. 





Vitofinia Oldon Clowned 
2teeen oj A<fi 

Jeans and plaid shirts were brought forth for the first 
big dance of the year, the Ag Barnwarmer {above). Candi- 
dates for Ag Queen went through rugged tests of their skill 
as farm hands. They drove tractors (left), milked and pitched 
hay and horseshoes. Queen of the evening was Virginia 
Olson of Coed Court, being crowned (below) by Dean R. I. 
Throckmorton of the School of Agriculture. The princesses 
were, from left to right, Marilyn Bush, Betty Lou Williams, 
Katherine Lowell and Monita McNeill. 




Campaigning by the fraternities for the coveted title 
of F.M.O.C. (Favorite Man on the Campus) for one 
of their members grew hot and hysterical in the final 
days before the Snow Ball. Signs, leaflets, sidewalk 
painting, and during-dinner skits at sorority houses 
were standard tactics. Sponsored by the Home Eco- 
nomics Clubs, the third annual Snow Ball became a 
big affair. 



Q.M.O.G. JlosuiM. 



Man of the hour was Allan Langton, Sigma Phi Epsilon and 
top-notch basketball player. Langton comes forward to 
receive crown and scepter (top). Part of the campaigning 
was carried on by marching pledges with sandwich boards 
in the Student Union (center). Favorite Man Langton draws 
the center of attention after intermission at the Ball, (bot- 
tom). Runners-up in the contest were Dick Winger, Alpha 
Gamma Rho, and Joe Adams, Alpha Kappa Lambda. 



72 







AGRICULTURAL ASSOCI- 
ATION — Back row: Elmer 
Blankenhagen, James P. 
Wood, John Tasker. Front 
row: Howard Borchardt, Dean 
Schowengerdt, Charles Nes- 
bir, William Haskett. 



Ag Committees Lead School Affairs 



'T'HE Ag Barn warmer, presentation of "K" medals 
to all agricultural judging team members, and 
management of the Little American Royal were among 
the year's activities of the Agricultural Association. 
Membership in the Association increased 300 this year 
to reach a total of 1,200. 

Students become members of the Association auto- 
matically when they enroll in agriculture. At their 
monthly seminars they meet to hear addresses by well 
known agricultural leaders. 

Dean Schowengerdt was president; Howard Bor- 
chardt, vice president; Bill Haskett, secretary; and 
James Wood, treasurer. Barnwarmer manager Elmer 
Blankenhagen was assisted by Charles Nesbit. The 
Ag Student, published four times yearly, was edited 
by John Tasker. Assistant Dean C. Mullen was faculty 
sponsor. 



In 1947, the Association members voted to amend 
the constitution to provide for an Agricultural Council. 
The Council, a policy making group concerned with 
inter-school affairs and student matters, is composed 
of 10 members. Each of the eight departments in the 
School of Agriculture elects its representative to the 
Council. The representative on the Student Council is 
automatically a member and chairman of the group. 
The Ag Association president is also a member. 

Dick Warren was chairman of the Council this year. 
Sidney Jagger, ag economics, was vice chairman; and 
George Krause, agronomy, was secretary. Other mem- 
bers were Dean Schowengerdt, Ag Association presi- 
dent; Glen McCormick, dairy; Lester Crandall, ag edu- 
cation; Richard Eaton, poultry; Howard Lindholm, 
animal husbandry; William Richards, milling industry; 
and Ray Gulley, horticulture. 




AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL 
—Back row: William H. Rich- 
ards, Richard C. Eaton, Lester 
L. Crandall. Second row: Dick 
Warren, Raymond A. Gulley, 
Sidney W. Jagger, George 
Krause. Front row: E. Glenn 
McCormick, Dean Schowen- 
gerdt, Howard Lindholm. 



73 





KLOD AND KERNEL KLUB— Back row: Bernard Knowles, Charles 
Simkins, Ross Laybourn, Verne Bathurst, John L. Parsons, Carl Bauer, 
Elbert Bell, Dean Reese, Shannon Nickelson. Second row: George E. 
Adams, James P. Wood, Nobel Peterson, John Robins, William 

KLOD AND KERNEL KLUB— Back row: Verlin Peterson, Melvin 
Burkhead, Daniel Knouse, Dale L. Smith, Elbert Green, Wilborn 
Day, Ronald Livers, Paul Dahlsten, William Steele, Luroy McDougal, 
Roger Hamilton. Second row: Alton Kale, Joseph Van Cleave, Charles 
F. Jacobs, Richard Rosenow, Walter Bieberly, Joe Gingrich, Virgil 



Haskett, Ethan Quakenbush, Joseph Schrader, Clinton Lundquist, 
Oliver Lutgen, Frank Bernasek. Front row: Donald W. George, Ernest 
Brenn, George Krause, Harold Heise, Alfred Koch, Carl W. Carlson, 
James Rockers, Kent Irish, Elton D. Cook, Wayne Pearce. 

Carlson, William Smies, Milton Thomas, Donald Ummel. Front row: 
Richard L. Thuma, Charles Herrick, Aubrey Bostwick, L. E. Lindgren 
Kenneth Morrison, Garrett Seaton, Harold E. Jones, Robert Winteroth, 
Kenneth Frantz, Joy Livingston. 



Judging Contest Sponsored by Club 



' I f HE Klod and Kernel Klub, agricultural organi- 
zation open to students majoring in agronomy, 
was headed by George Krause this year. The club 
carried on several educational activities and held social 
affairs to give students and faculty a change to know 
each other better. 

They helped the agronomy department sponsor the 
state high school crops judging contest. The club 
members judged the contest and awarded a medal to 
the highest individual and ribbons to the other winners. 

They also sponsored the intra-collegiate crops judg- 
ing contest held this spring. Prizes were given to 
winners of each of the three divisions — a section for 
students who had never had college training in crops 



judging, a junior group for students who had only 
beginning courses, and the senior division for majors 
in agronomy. 

Prospective members were given a chance to meet 
the old members and the faculty at the annual Klod and 
Kernel steak fry in the fall. Later in the year, the club 
participated in a ping-pong tournament in competition 
with the other ag organizations. 

Another activity was the float the group entered 
in the Homecoming parade in October. 

Joe Schrader acted as vice-president; Ronald Livers 
was secretary; and Wiliam Haskett was treasurer. Prof. 
Harold Jones was the faculty sponsor for the club. 



74 



Group Promotes Animal Husbandry 



^HE 120 members of the Block and Bridle Club 
have a three fold purpose. First, to promote 
higher scholastic standards among the students of ani- 
mal husbandry; second, to promote animal husbandry, 
especially all phases of student work in colleges and 
universities; and third, to bring about a closer relation- 
ship among the men pursuing some phase of animal 
husbandry. 

Any student registered in the collegiate course in 
agriculture of any university or who has signified that 
his major interest is in the field of animal husbandry, 
members of judging teams, professors, or specialists 
in the animal husbandry department are eligible for 
membership in the Block and Bridle Club. 

BLOCK AND BRIDLE CLUB— (Top Panel) Back row: Trevor 
Rees, Merl Champlin, Thomas Means, Ed McGinness, Byron Albers, 
Frank Carpenter, Emil Lehmann, Jr., Keith Beeman, Jim Sturdevant, 
Jim Kirkeminde, Philip Sanders. Fourth row: Raymond Kramer, 
Clyde Smith, Ray W. Smith, Harold L. Smith, Wm. Neely, Clarence 
Imel, Dick Warren, Linton Lull, Albert Blythe, Charles Dutton. 
Third row: Rollin Casement, Jack Savage, Edwin Draney, Duane 
Schirmer, Paul Thompson, Bill Edwards, Bob Crowley, Robert Kuhn, 
Howard Lindholm, Donald Love. Second row: Charles Nesbit, John E. 
Rogers, Curtis E. Tarrant, Wallace E. Brown, Lloyd Lewis, Wilbur 
Howell, Dick Jepsen, Leonard Lindholm, Richard M. Burns, Clinton 
Jacobs. Front row: Tom Carleton, Elmer Blankenhagen, Henry Hud- 



James Collier, as president, was assisted by Charles 
Nesbitt, vice-president; Linton Lull, secretary; Douglas 
George, treasurer; Wilbur Howell, corresponding sec- 
retary; and Roland Weaver, sergeant-at-arms. 

Activities of the club were the Block and Bridle 
Livestock Judging contest, the Little American Royal 
livestock show, the Animal Husbandry Feeders Day 
lunch, the Block and Bridle banquet the evening of 
Feeders Day, Block and Bridle dinner dance, the Voca- 
tional Agriculture Livestock Judging contest, and the 
Block and Bridle steak fry. A portrait gallery and a 
reading room were the special projects of the organi- 
zation. 

gens, Richard G. Clennin, Lester Goyen, Bill H. Clark, Bill Rossiter, 
Clifford Houghton, Walter Zurfluh. 

{Bottom Panel) Back row: George Moors, Chuck Medcalf, Julius 
Binder, Earl Nichols, Kenneth Corke, John Finley III, Willie H. 
Vaughan, Jr. Third row: Ralph Utermoehlen, Leroy Atwell, David 
Schirmer, Earl Williams, Everett Stephenson, Marvin Riggs, Victor 
Tilley, Lyle Snider. Second row: Tom Evans, Samuel Harris, Douglas 
George, Ben Price, Jr., James Collier, Clair K. Parcel, Lester Crandall, 
Dale McClaskey, Roland Weaver. Front row: William Van Skike, 
Elbert Cozine, Dick Winger, Richard Chase, Norman Minks, Leo 
Waller, Robert Frizell, Donald Beeman, Robert L. Hurd. 





75 




II 



L 



MILLING ASSOCIATION— Back roiv: Rex McCammon, James Conn, 
Boyce Dougherty, Max Tetlow, Howard Rinkel, Phillip Wiltfong, 
J. B. Morgenson. Third row: Charles Elmer, Glenn Munger, John A. 
Russell, John McCammon, William Richards, John E. Davis, Eugene 
Kern, Robert McFadden. Second row: Stephen Loska, William L. 



Williams, George Lewis, William Mahoney, J. D. Veal, Ralph Wolf- 
fing, Glenn Keast, John Womack, Wallace H. Champeny. Front 
row: Harold Shields, Don Buster, Max Gould, Charles H. Miller, 
Royce Pence, Jr., Mario Dirks, James V. Otto, Gene Swenson, Samuel 
W. Porter, Cuauhtemoc Salazar. 



Millers Learn of Industry Opportunities 



'nr'HE members of the Milling Association are students 
in one of the three curriculums of milling industry. 
The Association gives the students a chance to acquaint 
themselves with the industry and to learn of opportun- 
ities in the field. 

At the seminars, held once a month, prominent 
men from the milling industry are speakers. Some of 
the speakers this year were Marion Buckley, sanitation 
engineer of the Rogers Milling Company in St. Louis; 
Dr. C. H. Bailey, Dean and head of the Department 
of Agriculture at the University of Minnesota; Frank 
Wichser from the College; Roy K. Durham, technical 
service director of the Millers' National Federation; and 
Paul Dittemore, technical editor of Milling Production, 
an industry publication. 

Some of the members entered the annual essay con- 

MILLING ASSOCIATION— Back row: Hal Ross, Dean Nunn, Ed- 
ward Whiteside, William Glover, Blair Hackney, Don Rockers, Homer 
Elling, Ben Grogg. Third row: LaVern Hay, George W. Lawrence, 
Bill Barnes, Arnold Latschar, Harley Junghaus, Robert G. Brown, 
Thomas Flahive, "William Rosacker, Donald C. Abbott. Second row: 



test sponsored by the milling department. Beginning 
this year, the contest will end in the next fall semester 
instead of at the last of the spring semester. This 
change was planned to give the participants the whole 
summer to work on their essays. The students must 
draw at least a rough sketch, preferrably in detail, a 
model for use in a milling class to help make teaching 
easier and clearer. John A. Russell, the winner of the 
1946-47 contest, drew the plan for a miniature mill. 
This year, the entrants will also be asked to build the 
model so as to be sure it is practical. The award is a 
subscription to a milling publication. 

Officers of the Association this year were John Wo- 
mack, president; Clifford Batten, vice-president; and 
John McCammon, secretary-treasurer. Prof. Arlin B. 
Ward was faculty sponsor. 

Burt Porterfield, Loren D. Compton, Buster Lassen, William Reichert, 
Dean Willibey, Kenneth Fields, William Dodge, Don Iiams. Front 
row: Don Fleming, Royce O. Pence, Sr., John A. Shellenberger, Fred 
Merrill, Warren F. Keller, George Scheets, Arlin Ward, Frank W. 
Wichser, Don Vandagriff. 




76 



•£* o 




HORTICULTURE CLUB — Back row: Betty Goertzen, Betty Crab- 
tree, Edward Chandler, Robert Bell, Eugene Moffatt, Jr., Kenneth 
Goertzen, Carol Gulley, Lela Warner, Lorna Gore, Lowell Adee, 
Third row: Ervin Syfert, Edmund Meyers, Geo. A. Filinger, Ronald 
Campbell, James C. Bates, Wm. F. Pickett, L. R. Quinlan, Max 
Miller, Kwong Yeu Ting, Warren Wakeman. Second row: Everett 



E. Janne, Phillip Hedman, Lyle Crabtree Allen Orton, Almon Fish, Jr., 
Dale Weidman, Keneth Havel, Jack C. Brown, R. B. Ricklefs, Edward 
I. Stark. Front row: Herbert Weekly, Kenneth Bell, Raymond Gulley, 
Edward Goldsberry, William Gulley, Robert Yapp, Sheu Shan Kwong, 
Joseph J. Brady, Howard Borchardt, Hobart Falen. 



Advance Interest In Ag Fields 



'T'HE OBJECT of the Horticulture Club is to pro- 
mote good fellowship among its members and to 
advance interest in horticulture. It has been active for 
28 years. 

The 50 members of the organization are those 
faculty members and students who are in good stand- 
ing with the College and have shown an interest in 
some phase of horticulture. 

The Horticulture Club sponsored the pomology 
judging team and worked toward the improvement of 
the Marlatt farm and formal garden. 

Kenneth Goertzen served as president, aided by 
Raymond Gulley, vice-president; Carol Hess Gulley, 
treasurer; and Lorna Gore, secretary. 

POULTRY SCIENCE CLUB — Back row: Donald Warren, Dorothy 
Cochran, Kenneth McGinness, Arthur Carey, Bill Johnson. Thwd 
row: Loyal Payne, Johnie Woods, Clarence Gish, James Mall, James 
Bader, Harold Brown. Second row: Thomas James, Robert Coombs, 



The College turkeys for Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas were dressed by the Poultry Science Club. Other 
activities of the organization included the sponsorship 
of the State High School Poultry Judging contest and 
the All-College Poultry Judging contest, a club bar- 
beque, and editing the National Collegiate Poultry 
Club Newsletter. 

The Poultry Club, organized in 1936, strives to 
create further interest in poultry husbandry and to 
promote friendship and cooperation among the students 
and faculty. Leadership in the club was provided by 
John Hillerman, president; Bill Carinder, vice-president; 
and Bill Johnson, secretary. Prof. C. L. Gish was the 
faculty advisor. 

Claude Moore, Joe Howard, Herman Smith. Front row: Richard 
Eaton, William Carinder, Tom Avery, Ellis Wise, Donald McWilliams, 
John Hillerman. 




77 




CHAPARAJOS — Back row: Phil Hull, Joyce Pratt, Dorothy Mc- 
George, Velma Brumm, Barbara Collins, Georgia Rose Scholl, Pauline 
Simcox, Janey Thomas, Nancy Neely. Third row: Jean Neal, John 
FinleyJII, Martha Barlow, Willard Phillips, Ben Price, Jr., Elwyn 
Liebl, John Hart, Dewaine Stapp. Second row: W. S. Anderson, Vene 



Leichliter, Harold Wright, Richard Knowlton, Robert Kuhn, Fred 
Germann, Charles Sherlock, Sam Koury, Dick Clennin. front row: 
Delbert Berry, Ted Bryant, Dean McCallum, Dick Jepson, Wilbur 
Howell, Dick Schmitz, Albert Nelson, Leslie Moore, Dick Warren, 
O. O. Vieux. 



Special Interests Bring New Clubs 



A RODEO last spring was the first big project 

sponsored by the Chaparajos. The Club, in its 

second year on the campus, is organized for all students 

interested in riding. The roll of the group now totals 

more than 50 members. 

The rodeo, an intercollegiate-high school show, fea- 
tured saddle bronco riding, bare-back bronc riding, 
calf roping, bulldogging and rope spinning. The rodeo 
lasted three days. On April 8 and 9 the club competed 
with the Oklahoma A. and M. riding organization in a 
spring dual. The club also participated in New Mexico 
State College's rodeo. Members of the Chaparajos fur- 
nished music and other acts for the Little American 
Royal in the spring. 

Dick Warren headed the organization. Sam Koury 
was vice-president, and Dick Jepson was secretary. 

PLOW AND PEN CLUB— Back row: Ralph Lashbrook, John Tasker, 
Lloyd Ungles, Dorothy Cochran, James Orton, Ralph Arnold. Second 
row: Paul Gwin, Donald Alexander, Norville Gish, James Crippen, 



Founded last fall, the Plow and Pen Club is the 
organization for the benefit of the agricultural jour- 
nalists on the campus. It is believed to be the first 
organization of its kind in the world. The club publi- 
cized major campus agricultural events this year and 
promoted high scholastic standards in the curriculum. 

The group had 25 members, 18 of whom were 
charter members, including Prof. R. R. Lashbrook, 
and Prof. Elbert B. Macy. They met twice monthly to 
hear speakers outstanding in their field. For enter- 
tainment, the club members had a chili supper last 
fall and later on, a banquet with Prof. R. R. Lashbrook 
as speaker. 

Philip Sanders was president of the club, Donald 
Alexander, vice-president. Norville Gish acted as sec- 
retary, Paul Gwin, treasurer, James Orton, reporter. 

Philip Sanders, Elbert Macy. Front row: William Bork, Richard Burns, 
Dale Wiseman, Roger Hecht, Ralph Alden, Donald Tarver, George 
Smith. 









AGRICULTURE ECONOMICS CLUB— Back row: Oscar Albrecht, 
Khaled Abed, Karl Ostlund, Richard DeFord, Emery Castle, Glen 
Allen. Third row: BuFord Sharpe, Emmett Scott, Charles Armstrong, 
James Leathers, Michael Newborg, Kenneth McGinness, Harold Ray. 
Second row: Kenneth Winterscheidt, John Dotson, Fletcher Riggs, 
Norman Collins, John Sjo, Leland Vatheauer. First row: Wayne 
Pearce, Paul Thompson, Dan Cain, Wayne Keast, Max Friesen, Joe 
Gillenwater, Robert Hatcher. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION— Back row: Charles Huff, Marvin 
Riggs, Samuel Stenzel, John Nace, Ralph D. Parks, Duane Steeples, 
Billy Hilt, Gerald Lawrence, Evan West, George A. Robinson. Fifth 



row: Clarence Haverkamp, Delbert Carper, Frank Carpenter, Dean T. 
Miller, John Lacey, Milton Keim, Robert Whitaker, Charles L. Ross, 
Don Brock, Samuel Harris, Donald Lawrence. Fourth row: James 
Dobkins, Don D. Ward, Harold Guhr, Oliver Kuss, Jerry M. Gee, 
Darwin Householder, Robert W. Anderson, Marvin E. Smith, Karl 
Will, Harold L. Kugler. Thir row: Raymond Marmon, Wyman 
White, Nathan Masey, Marcell Tinkler, Duane McCune, Charles Hund, 
Clinton Jacobs, Louis Emme, Warren Harding, Harold Eversmeyer. 
Second row: Wilfred Reist, Jack E. McClaskey, David Bogart, Gilbert 
Hamilton, Merle Howes, Lester Crandall, Dillon Higgason. Fron row: 
Ralph Utermoehlen, Wayne Coltrain, Jim Esslinger, F. E. Simmons, 
Earl Nichols. 



Agriculture Clubs Feature Speakers 



~D ESEARCH on job opportunities in the field of 
agricultural economics has been the project of the 
Ag Economics Club this year. 

A smoker during the fall semester gave prospective 
members and the club members a chance to meet each 
other. In the spring, the club steak fry, following a 
baseball game, was the big event. 

Prof. George Montgomery sponsored the group of 
about 45 ag economics or ag administration majors. 
Officers for the fall semester were Emery Castle, presi- 
dent of the group; Glenn Allen, vice-president; Fletcher 
Riggs, treasurer; John Dotson, recording secretary; and 
John Schnittker, corresponding secretary. 



The Agricultural Education Club for all students 
enrolled in ag education or planning to teach agricul- 
ture, had 85 members this year. The club assisted with 
the high school judging contests in agriculture and farm 
mechanics meeting held on the campus this spring, and 
also handled the two day meeting of the Kansas Associ- 
ation of Future Farmers of America. Off-campus 
speakers were featured at the six meetings during the 
school year. 

Frank Carpenter was the president this year. Wayne 
Coltrain, vice-president; George Robinson, treasurer 
and Louis D. Emme, secretary. Prof. A. P. Davidson 
was faculty advisor. 



79 




COLLEGIATE 4-H CUJB—Back 
row: Ima Jean Kidd, J. B. Fleming, 
Den Mertz, Jean McCallum. Second 
oru>: Clifford Spangler, Roscoe 
Allen, Jack Stewart, Loreta Strick- 
lin, Roy Cartee. Front row: La- 
verna Lenhart, Ronald Schreiner, 
Paul Eckstein, Irvin Lanier, Wilma 
Thomas. 



4-H Expands In Size and Activities 



/CONTINUING to grow since its organization on 
the Campus in 1927, the Collegiate 4-H Club has 
steadily increased its activities and influence, as well as 
the size of membership. 

The group, sponsored by the State 4-H Club depart- 
ment, began its existence at the College with 60 mem- 
bers, counted an enrollment of 475 last year, and this 
year 590 students have participated in club meetings 
and projects. 

To become a member of the Collegiate 4-H Club, 
one must be a present or former 4-H member. The 
organization's purpose may be listed in three points: 
( 1 ) To maintain contact with former 4-H Club mem- 



bers and rural students with a similar background of 
interests; (2) To make a contribution to 4-H Club 
work on a state-wide basis; (3) To make a definite 
contribution to Kansas State College. 

President of the group this year was John Sjo, with 
Harold Dalbom, vice-president, and Betty Warren, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Among the many activities and special projects of 
the organization was the contribution of $4,500 as 
maturity value in bonds for the Student Union, a choir 
stall in the all-faith chapel, and financial assistance in 
developing 4-H projects throughout the state. 



vacs • '*fcu &&Jki 



ft s o 




COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB (First 
Panel) — Back row: Keesling, An- 
derson, Hundley, Lynn, Gardner, 
Bender, Casey, Duphorne, Chap- 
man, Baker. Fourth row: Breve, 
Risley, Kirkendall, Hurd, Bieberly, 
Gould, Luthi, Gies, Craft, Engler. 
Third roiv: Johnson, Armstrong, 
Lukens, Champlin, Harkness, Case- 
ment, Guest, Brooks, Cooley, 
Reece, Kugler. Second row: Luthi, 
Heise, Lyon, Jacobson, Koch, Lind- 
holm, Christiansen, Hartung, Lar- 
son, Bathurst. Front row: Keas, 
Francis, Kelling, Lenhart, Knoche, 
Finley. 



COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB (Second 
Panel) — Back row: Cederberg, 
Byerly, Moate, Billington, Hansen, 
Edwards, Donaky, Keech, Borck, 
Hawes, Allen. Fourth row: Day, 
Grandfield, Atwell, Holden, Bohn- 
enblust, Hansen, Hathaway, Field, 
Doyen, Flentie, Blystone. Third 
row: Haddock, Chase, George, Hos- 
kins, Gilbert, Clark, Hoffman, 
Clark, Koon, Dunbar. Second 
row: Kuhn, Draney, Crowley, 
Lindholm, Lewis, Edwards, Col- 
linge, Hayward, Christie, Banman. 
Front row: Grandfield, Dickey, 
Koch, Allman, Enders, Carnahan, 
Keiswetter, Hartman. 



80 



COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB— 
(Top Panel) Back row: Don is 
Clary, Helen Cazier, Rosalie 
Germann, Wayne Coltrain, 
Don Benne, Norman Held, 
Thyra Bollinger, Barbara Col- 
lins, Lois Gillan. Third row: 
Keith Beeman, Jim Bondurant, 
Corliss Ballon, Norman John- 
son, Rolland Jones, Billy 
Langhofer, Floyd Leonard, 
Clinton Davies, Donald Fish- 
er, Tennyson Collins. Second 
row: Max Deets, John Konec- 
ny, Donald Hopkins, Byron 
Albers, Dale Allen, Dale 
Handlin, H. Dale Johnson, 
Allen Honeyman, Lester 
Goyen, Dale Apel, Daniel 
Denneler. Front row: Dale 
Gillan, Elden Anderson, Har- 
old Dalbom, Harold Evers- 
meyer, Robert Speer, Harvey 
Arand, Fred Germann, Arthur 
Beat, Donald Love, Laurel 
Goddard, Kenneth Dageforde. 



COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB— 

(Next to top panel) Back row: 
Virginia Sedgwick, Barbara 
McCoid, Lyle Snider, Dorothy 
Berbermeyer, Howard Wood, 
Martha Adee, Twila Oltjen, 
Carol Hoyt, Ruth Tichenor, 
Esther Page, Carrol Ramsey. 
Fourth row: Marjorie Roepke, 
Verla Meyers, Vada Walsten, 
Wallace Terrill, Marion 
Thomas, Ray Rose, Arthur 
Schumann, Bob Snyder, Mari- 
lyn Keeshan, Jeanne Frisbie, 
Edith Wilson. Third row: 
Theresa Navinskey, Marjorie 
Schowengredt, Weldon Riley, 
William Stiles, Robert Ches- 
ney, John Sjo, Hal Rams- 
bottom, Richard Tesche, Dale 
Schwindaman, George Moors, 
Mary Ann Swenson, Mary 
Smith. Second row: Gale 
Beck, Jim Kirkeminde Jim 
Pattinson, Don Quakenbush, 
Dean Schowengerdt, Raymond 
Neher, Bob Williams, ,Robert 
Weatherbie, Dean Newell, 
Dale Paulsen, Jeanne Warren. 
Front row: Neva Seiler, Betty 
Wilson, Marjorie Rezac, Mar- 
garet Russel, Edward Robins, 
Mary Nelson, Janey Hackney, 
Bonnie Mallory, Betty War- 
ren, Elizabeth Mayall. 






;..-. 






COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB— (Next to Bottom Panel) Back row: Kath- 
leen Carey, Helen Stricklin, Margaret Alderman, Darrell Houk, 
George Stauffer, Marion Terrill, Mary Lou Markley, Helen Spears, 
Julia Gardner, Claribel Dole, Kathlyn Kennedy. Third row: Joel 
Morrison, Dale McCloskey, Loren Goyen, Glenn Wolfe, Robert Acre, 
Jr., Donald Allen, Max Swartz, Mary Schlagel, Iris Ann Shaw, Louise 
Beim, Carol Sprinkel. Second row: Clifford Bellinger, Earl Wendland, 
Miles McKee, Trevor Rees, Neil Vaughn, Duane Steeples, Kenneth 
Pricer, Dick Winger, Emory Swanson, Wendell Maddox, Katherine 
Wingert. Front row: Laurel Sundgren, George Starkey, Weldon 
Loader, Marian Sedlacek, John McBride, Edward Speer, Edward 
Murray, Walter McKee, Kenneth Rice, Wilbur Taylor, Phillip Wend- 
land, John Gruber. 

COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB— ( Bottom Panel) Back row: Stanley Wood, 
Doris Hopkins, Margie Pishny, Margaret Austin, Irma Ready, Char- 



lene Cusic, Marcelyn McCoy, Lavone Harrison. Betty Harding, Helen 
Cool, Louise Mosier, Marvin Riggs. Fifth row: Bernice Lehman, Frank 
Mosier, Steward Mettler, Victor Tilley, Lewis Stratton, Florence 
Larsen, Kay Larson, Jane Foster, Vadaline Strobel, Iris Rahn, Eliza- 
beth David, Bob Severance. Fourth row: John Wilk, John Watt, Paul 
Nelson, Kenneth Jones, Ross McPhail, Donald Lawrence, Lawrence 
McCarty, Allen Watts, Calvin Schridde, Marshall Schirer, Michael 
Murphy, Don Riegel. Third row: Robert Wilson, Walter David, 
Bernard Kastens, Ervin Williams, Marvin Gough, Armin Samuelson, 
Dale Watson, Stanley Meinen, Lewis Boys, Harold Mertz, Durreth 
Robbins. Second row: LaVerne Dewess, Rosemary Wright, Mary 
Alice Nelson, Betty Pressgrove, Betty Butler, Mary Noble, Willa 
Mills, Willis Cross, Bonnie Sobers, Maryls Wain, Doris Lehman. 
Front row: Lloyd Wiseman, Ed McGinness, Clifford Houghton, 
Robert Ward, Harold Ramsey, Marguerite Nebergall, Helen Gillmore, 
Norma McDowell, Frank Overley, Roger Wilk, Bill Parker. 



81 





DAIRY CLUB — Back row: Gordon Nelson, Thomas C. Roberts, 
Francis Hunt, Elroy Eberwein, Donald Hopkins, John Wilk, Arthur 
Jacobs, Harry Mudge, Bobby Demott. Fourth roiv: Don Riegel, Stan 
Fansher, Dwight Reece, F. W. Atkeson, W. H. Chilson, G. H. Beck, 
F. C. Fountaine, T. J. Claydon, Earl Phillips, Donald Bircher. Third 
row: Harry Ainslie, Robert Watson, Arthur Beat, William Bridge- 

SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON— Back row: Louis Riseman, Charles Bear- 
man, Vincent Coombs, James Walker. Third row Wallace Penn, 
J. R. Chelikowsky, C. W. Matthews, R. A. Scalapino, A. W. Neff, 
W. H. Bush. Second row: A. B. Sperry, Frank Byrne, Henry Beck, 



water, Thomas Bentley, Dean Bishop, Harold Ramsey, Lowell Strickler, 
Richard Spare, Lester Windier. Second row: Wallace Moyle, Alfred 
Gigstad, Robert Wultkuhle, Lloyd Luthi, Donald Jacobson, Glenn Mc- 
Cormick, Albert Nelson, Loran Scott, Dale Watson, Vernon Yaussi. 
Front row: Billie Reid, William Furtick, Roger Wilkowske, Clarence 
Stahlman, Sidney Brettschneider, James Pretz. 

John Wells, George Jones, Wendell Johnson. Front row: Kenneth 
Walters, Harold Metz, O. W. Tollefson, James Clark, Melville Mudge, 
Harry Pearce, Charles Lanphere. 



Sponsors Programs in Special Curriculums 



A NYONE enrolled in the School of Agriculture 
who is interested in dairying is eligible for mem- 
bership in the Dairy Club. It is the purpose of this 
organization to promote better relations between the 
faculty and the student body. 

The Dairy Cattle Judging Contest and the Dairy 
Products Judging Contest are sponsored by the members 
of the club. It is also a part of their schedule to assist 
with the Little American Royal in the spring. Farm 
and Home Week programs and the Future Farmers 
of America project complete the activities. 

The Dairy Club was under the direction of Glenn 
McCormick, president; Jack Graham, vice-president; 
Arthur Beat, secretary; and Harry Mudge, treasurer. 



Geology displays in Fairchild Hall, the compiling 
of a bibliography of geology in Kansas, and the spon- 
soring of the Williston Geology Club are among the 
activities of the one-year-old Sigma Gamma Epsilon, 
national professional college organization. 

Last fall the fraternity visited Kansas University 
and attended the K.U.-K-State football game. In the 
evening they heard a talk by the former head of the 
K. U. geology department. Several members of the 
fraternity attended the National Convention of Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon in St. Louis this year. 

Melville Mudge was president, Charles Bearman was 
vice-president; Wendell Johnson was secretary-editor; 
and Prof. J. R. Chelikowsky was secretary-treasurer. 



82 



Geology Club Reactivated in Fall 



; I f HE Williston Geology Club was reactivated last 
fall after having been incorporated into the geology 
fraternity, Sigma Gamma Epsilon, in the spring of 
1947. The fraternity requires 14 hours of geology 
and a high academic standing for membership. So 
the geology club was continued in order that fresh- 
man and sophomore in geology not yet eligible to 
belong to the fraternity might have a club. It is 
sponsored by Sigma Gamma Epsilon and is open to any 
student majoring in geology. 

The organization's purpose is to give the students 
a chance to learn about the opportunities open to them 
in the phases of the field, such as engineering geology 
and economic geology. 

WILLISTON GEOLOGY CLUB— Back row: Louis Riseman, Joseph 
Chelikowsky, Louie Chrisman, Steward Mettler, Peggy Markham, 
Ruth Matthews, Marjorie Roepke, Robert McCormack, Charles Bear- 
man, Wallace Penn. Third row: James Walker, Larsen Drake, Walter 
Thomas, Claude Matthews, John Branson, Arthur Sperry, Frank 
Byrne, John Reiff, Arthur Neff, Stanley Wood. Second row: Wendell 

WILLISTON GEOLOGY CLUB— Back row: Don Mattler, Ralph 
Scalapino, Charles Steincamp, Edgar Darrow, Robert McClure, Arthur 
Steinkirchner, William Rieniets. Third row: Shelton Howard, Vernon 
Hoover, Charles McCormick, William Miller, Merle Hicks, Robert 
Berndt, Robert Bader, Robert Burton. Second row: Robert Cowdery, 



This year the members met every two weeks in semi- 
nars sponsored by the geology fraternity. Some of 
the speakers they heard were Prof. Eric R. Lyon, from 
the physics department; W. F. Kipper, county engineer; 
Prof. M. J. Harbaugh, speaking on the relationship 
between zoology and geology; Prof. B. B. Brainard, who 
discussed geology in engineering; and instructors and 
professors from within the department. 

The organization is named in honor of one of the 
most famous graduates in geology from Kansas State. 
Officers in the club were Melville Mudge, president; 
Charles Bearman, vice-president; Wendell Johnson, 
secretary-editor; and Prof. J. R. Chelikowsky, secretary- 
treasurer. Prof Arthur B. Sperry was group sponsor. 

Johnson, Ernst Bishop, Max Krey, Ralph O'Connor, Henry Beck, 
Richard Roby, Bryan Gates, Duane Godwin, Charles Lanphere, John 
Clark. Front row: George Jones, Darwin Asper, Donald Hemphill, 
Donald Thurlow, O. W. Tollefson, Jarvis Hill, John Earl, Charles 
Volkel, Charles Lane, Thomas Bridge, Kenneth Walters. 



Richard Clowers, Harold Metz, William Clark, Harold Nelson, 
Harold Mathy, Jack Matthews, Gordon McCauley, Lyle Crabtree. 
Front row: Dale Dannels, Kenneth Fatzer, Melville Mudge, Harry 
Pearce, Ralph Skoog, Howard Kendall, Herbert Baker, Wilbur Pfen- 
ninger, Walter Poulsen, John Wells. 





83 




HILLEL FOUNDATION — 

Back row: Betty Milner, Char- 
lotte Weis, Mildred Lubroth, 
Shirley LeRoy, Tamara Cha- 
juss. Second row: Sidney 
Brettschneider, Victor Kauf- 
man, Fritz Moore, Stanford 
LeRoy, George Rogers. Front 
row: Max Milner, Aaron Ko- 
misar, Albert Haron, William 
Fiden, Arthur Froog. 



Campus Organizations Set High Goals 



h I *HE HILLEL Foundation is an organization of 
Jewish students on the campus. The group met 
this year in Wesley Hall for discussion concerning con- 
temporary world affairs and a study of their cultural 
heritage. Several of the religious holidays celebrated 
by Hillel members were the traditional Jewish New 
Year in September, the passover Seder, and the Purim 
festival in March. 

The organization completed its second year at the 
College in March. 

There were 35 members in the group, which had 
several social functions during the year. The impor- 
tant social affair was a Valentine buffet supper and 
dance for all members. 

Bill Fiden held the position of president last fall. In 
the spring semester, Victor Kaufman was president. 
Other officers were Herbert Langer, vice-president, and 
Barbara Auerback, secretary. 



The aim of the Student American Guild of Organists 
is to advance the knowledge and appreciation of organ- 
playing and of church music among society at large 
as well as among its members. The group is composed 
of students of organ under the direction of Prof. Robert 
Hays, a colleague in the larger group of the American 
Guild of Organists. 

At one of the Guild's monthly meetings, Professor 
Hays played records to illustrate the tone of the organ. 
President Milton S. Eisenhower, of the College, and 
Prof. Luther Leavengood, head of the Department of 
Music, were guests. At other meetings, Profesor Hays 
demonstrated various organ techniques to the members. 

The president of the Guild was Corine Holm. Frank 
McCreary acted as vice-president and Jerry Gatz was 
secretary-treasurer. Several of the Guild members do- 
nate their time and talents at the organ in local 
churches. 




AMERICAN GUILD OF 
ORGANISTS — Back row: 
Madge Crabb, Betty Heggy, 
Peggylu Butler, Jerry Gatz. 
Second row: Robert Hays, 
Anna Martin, Jo Harriett Hof- 
sess, Patricia Nelson, Margene 
Falen. Front row: Gailand 
Bartlett, Harold Vicory, Nor- 
man Collins, Patricia Moll. 



84 



MINIWANCA CLUB — Back 
row: Norma White, Vada Wal- 
sten, William Beale, Lester 
Goyen, Robert Acre, Jr. Second 
row: Dorothy Stover, Mary 
Schlagel, Virginia Grandfield, 
Lavone Harrison. Front row: 
Dean Schowengerdt, Mrs. Mer- 
ton Otto, Thomas Means, Ed- 
ward Robins. 




Interest Groups Carry Out Programs 



A LL students who have ever attended a summer 
session at Camp Miniwanca, Shelby, Mich., on a 
Danforth Scholarship are members of the Miniwanca 
Club. Most of the members were sent to the camp on 
recommendation of 4-H clubs and the Schools of Home 
Economics and Agriculture. 

The sponsors of the organization — Mr. and Mrs. 
Loyal F. Payne and Mr. and Mrs. Merton L. Otto — have 
also attended the camp. 

The club carries on the Miniwanca spirit and Mr. 
Danforth's program of mental, social, religious, and 
physical development for more abundant living. The 
members spend part of their meeting time singing 
camp songs. 

Officers in the club this year were Bob Acre, presi- 
dent; Vada Walsten, vice-president; Norma White, 
secretary and treasurer; Jeanne Beezley, reporter; and 



Roger Wilk, song leader. 

Membership in Orchesis is determined by interest 
and sincerity of purpose. There is an apprentice period 
of one month for those new to the club. The goals of 
the organization are to promote an understanding of 
dance as a creative art expression, and to offer those 
who are esepcially interested in dance an opportunity 
to extend their experience and enjoyment in the field 
by paraticipating in cooperative group activity. 

Pat Wilkinson headed the organization, assisted by 
Peggy McClay, vice-president; and Laura Pfeffer, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

Orchesis was reorganized on the campus this year 
after a two year period of inactivity. The club gave a 
program in cooperation with the music department 
and assisted other groups whenever dance was needed. 



ORCHESIS — Back row: Tamara 
Chajun, Margaret Atwood. Sec- 
ond row: Peggy McClay, Olga 
Carrasas, Pat Wilkinson. Front 
row: Elizabeth Heckman, Laura 
Pfeffer. 




85 




MATHEMATICS CLUB— Back row: Vernon Nyhoff, Virginia Eis, 
Phyllis L. Johnson, Kathryn Leeper, Tanner Myers, Benjamin Petrie, 
Jr. Second row: Anna Dueser, Carl E. Johnson, Donald Rader, 



Robert Reinking, Kent Pearl. Front row: Edison Greer, Deane Juhlin, 
Brenton Madison, Laurel Dirks, James Steward, Wayne Cowell. 



Meet To Discuss Major Subjects 



A yT EMBERS of the Mathematics Club met the sec- 
ond Tuesday of every month to hear talks and 
discussions on phases of mathematics not presented in 
college courses. The talks, which were kept on the 
undergraduate level, were made by seniors and more 
advanced students. 

The club gave mathematics majors and students 
from other curriculums interested in the science a 
chance to get acquainted with one another. In the 
spring the club members attended the annual steak fry. 

The president of the organization last year was 
James Steward. Vernon Nyhoff was vice-president; 
Kathryn Leeper was secretary; and Phyllis Lou John- 
son was treasurer. 



The Kansas State College Entomological Club is the 
new name that was given early this year to the old 
Popenoe Entomological Club. No change was made 
in the activities or purpose of the club, which is organ- 
ized for all those with a sincere interest in entomology. 
The 45 members met during the year to discuss ento- 
mology and related subjects. 

Sponsoring the Kansas Entomological Society and 
its journal was an important project. Special displays 
in Fairchild Hall were planned by the club. The group 
also was host to the meeting of Pest Control Operators. 

J. O. Hubbard was president of the organization. 
Winifred Rhodes acted as vice-president, with Wood- 
row Franklin as secretary. 



KANSAS STATE ENTOMOLOGICAL CLUB— Back row: Justus 
Frankenfeld, Walter Emery, Maurice Lamb, Dana Childs, Harold 
Brooks, Harold Rife, Adel Kamal, William McGee, Roy Stansbury, 
Howard Smith. Third row: Carl Bauer, Louis Kuitert, joe Moffett, 
W. W. Franklin, Tom Gatie, Dell Gates, Elmer Jones, D. A. Wilbur, 
Fred Butcher, W. E. McCauley. Second row: Ray Millard, Wesley 



Moore, Arthur Goodrich, Orlan Cooley, Norbert Kauffeld, Reginald 
Painter, Harold Elmer, Rodger Mitchlel, Frank Miller, Jr., James 
Kring, R. L. Parker. Front row: Hary Bryson, James Hibbard, George 
Dean, Chris Burkhardt, W. C. Rhoades, Paul Dahm, Roger Smith, 
Leonard Redlinger, Emilio Viale, E. L. Eshbaugh. 




86 




PROMUSICA — Back row: Juanita Silva, Norene Francis, Carolyn 
Hinds, Anna Martin, Georgi Gress, Barbara D. Clark, Geraldine Beam, 
Jean Vogt. Second row: Jerry L. Gatz, Betty Krehbiel, Madge A. 
Crabb, John A. Crabb, Madeline Asher, Jane C. Colby, Edna Ann 



Hammond, Leanna Siler. Front row: Ruth A. Bauersfeld, Jo Ellen 
McNicholas, Joann Blackwelder, Olivia Tiemann, Juanita Cooper, 
Glendeen Link, Mary Collister, Molly Weathers. 



Plan Balanced Year's Activities 



/^HRISTMAS caroling and a spring picnic high- 
lighted the year's activities for Promusica. This 
is an organization to promote the understanding and 
enjoyment of music and to provide an opportunity for 
those interested in music to meet socially. 

The only membership requirement for Promusica is 
an interest in music. The programs of the club included 
all types of music from symphonies to boogie woogie. 

This year the organization was under the leadership 
of Jerry Gatz, president; Gerry Beam, vice-president; 
Juanita Cooper, secretary; Mary Collister, treasurer; 
Anna Martin, program chairman; Juanita Silva, pro- 
gram co-chairman; and Georgi Gress, social chairman. 
Charles Stratton was the sponsor for Promusica. 

The Kansas State Masonic Club is among the newer 
organizations on the campus and was recognized by the 

K-STATE MASONIC CLUB— Back row: Jack Greenawalt, Verne 
Stephens, Oliver Maskil, Franklin Cornelius, Ralph Swearingen, Chris 
White, Theodore Clark, Lowell Adee. Third row: Max Hutchins, 
Ervin Syfert, Clarence Clem, James Bates, Philip Baker, Irvin Middle- 
ton, James Lareau, Norman Minks, Benjamin Landis. Second row: Wil- 



Organization Control Board at the beginning of the 
fall semester. 

The 75 members of this club are Master Masons, 
affiliated with the College. Their purpose is to pro- 
mote better fellowship among the Masons on the 
campus. 

The Masonic Club program included coaching teams, 
educational programs, dances, stag parties, joint parties 
with the K-State Eastern Star Club, and assistance with 
Masonic funerals. 

Officers of the Masonic Club were Donald E. Sim- 
mons, president; Edward W. Smith, vice-president; 
William G. S. Neal, recording secretary; Ollie W. 
White, Jr., corresponding secretary; Ervin W. Syfert, 
treasurer; Luther P. Moore, sergeant-at-arms. Dr. A. 
C. Andrews and Dr. J. C. Bates were the club sponsors. 

liam Neal, Walter Gage, Earl Govell, Richard Lachman, Harry Smith, 
Donald Simmons, Luther Moore, Jack Powell, Wallace Barrett. Front 
row: Kent Irish, Arthur Andrews, Raymond Wilson, Charles Manke, 
Richard Erickson, Edward Smith, Donald Cade, Robert Weatherbie, 
Carl Coonrod. 




87 




BUSINESS CLUB— Back row: Lyle Schmidt, J. R. Renner, Harvey 
Wingerd, Dennis Henricks, Francis Schmidt, Ralph Nanninga, Lucille 
Gier, LaVerne Johnson, Dorothy Bochaus, Guy Bemis, Jo Ann Jeffries. 
Fourth row: Max Hutchins, Gail Morrison, V. S. Kirkendall, Phil 
True, Frank McBride, Mary Lorson, Calvin Kruse, Geneva Brunnemer, 
Donald Fisher, Charles Niernberger. Third row: Arthur Jewett, Keith 
DeWyke, Leonard Rockers, Keneth Bender, John H. Wagner, Bernard 



Schmitt, Warren Berquist, Kenneth Walker, Thomas Moore. Second 
row: Jack Newell, Earl Coder, Keith Venburg, Duane Tietze, Harry 
Stewart, Harold Vicory, Conrad Eriksen, Vance Templeton, Edward 
Prentice, Stephen Sage. Front row: Lorraine Rees, Paul Beightel, 
Leo Ream, Peggy Lee, Arlene Pierce, Grace Samuelson, Gloria Nan- 
ninga, Jean Bergner. 



Business Club Travels, Has Picnics 



A LL business administration majors are eligible for 
membership in the Business Club, which is organ- 
ized in order that the students may become better 
acquainted. The 150 members met once a month this 
year to hear talks given by prominent business men. 
Two picnics, in the fall and spring, honored out- 
standing students and were the social events of the year 
for the club. 

In April, a group of the students including those 
who will graduate before June, 1949, spent two days 
in Kansas City on an inspection trip. They visited a 

BUSINESS CLUB — Back row: Maxine Keesling, Jules Funston, Joseph 
Walsh, Harry Brownlee, Hazen Hess, Eugene Bruner, Gail Salisbury, 
Bennie Stewart, Pete Bacon, Donald DeCou, Bernard Jilka, Doris 
Myers. Fourth row: James Kilkenny, John Domeny, William Horton, 
Max Nightingale, Milton Kilmer, Gilbert Dodge, Dick Krizman, 
Eugene Gering, E. S. Bagley, Frank Bradley, William Rickert. Third 
row: David Lewis, Glen Scanlan, Duane Van Horn, Keith Kehmeier, 



number of business firms to get an idea of different 
types of economic activity. 

Among these firms was the Board of Trade where 
they saw how transactions were carried out on the 
trading floor. The students also stopped at the Federal 
Reserve Bank. 

Officers of the organization were Ralph Glotzbach, 
president; Louis Norris, vice-president; Jo Ann Jeffries, 

secretary; and Nancy Wilcox, treasurer. Prof. Edgar 
Bagley and Prof. Harry M. Stewart were faculty spon- 
sors. 

Clyde Carver, T. O. Dodge, W. J. Clark, T. D. Letbetter, Bernard 
Roach, Ralph Glotzbach, Betty Glotzbach. Second row: Charles 
Musil, Dan Linn, Max Immenschuh, Robert Norton, Carl Pache, Louis 
Smith, W. R. Rigler, Earl Gowell, William Schille. Front row: 
Richard Sherman, Ray Rodick, Arthur Blanchat, Donald Bickle, 
Michael Myers, Glenn Long, Nancy Wilcox, Betty Crawford, Martha 
Beckman, Thelma Stous, Virginia Dibbens, Eva Ward. 





COSMOPOLITAN CLUB — Back row: Ching Pun, Nasao Hamasu, 
Yim Mah, Hilka Dunn, Jason Nakashima, Yen Liao, Thabit Al-safar, 
Mildred Lubroth, Dorothy Wells, Margaret Seaton, Angelina Lepori. 
Third row: Tamara Chajuss, June Sizemore, Hazel Molzen, June Du- 
phorne, Viola Furumoto, Edwin Chung, Adel Kamal, George Dunn, 
Bernita Skelton, Khan Hidayatullah, Khaled Abed, Pe-sin Su. Second 



row: Elizabeth Tamblyn, Albert Ting, Gustavo Rosania, Edward 
Chandler, Robert Rea, Michael Newborg, Jalal Jaber, Samir Shadid, 
Howard Furumoto, Twila Erikson. Front row: Om Nijhawan, Eugene 
Lewis, Laura Quakenbush, John Shellenberger, Migdonio Seidler, 
John Sanchez, George Damiani, Hussain Al-ani, Albert Haron, S. M. 
H. Gaafar, Yezid de la Cuesta. 



Promote Good Will Among Nations 



' I 'HE K-STATE Cosmopolitan Club was in charge 
of writing and printing the Cosmopolitan Review, 
a quarterly paper which included articles from Cosmo- 
politan clubs all over the country. The local chapter 
was also responsible for planning the regional con- 
ference to be held next Christmas. 

Angelina Lepori, from Panama, served as president 
of the Cosmopolitan Club the past year. She was 
assisted by Toni Darby, vice-president; and George 
Damiani of Palestine, treasurer. The faculty sponsors 
were Prof, and Mrs. C. H. Miller and Prof, and Mrs. 
M. D. Ramirez. 

The organization had 60 members, almost twice as 
many as last year. 

CLUB CERVANTES— Back row: Mary Frances Weaver, Manuel D. 
Ramirez, Luis G. Ibarguen, Gloria Lee Buckles, Dorothy Hamilton, 
Angelina Lepori, Yolanda Palacios. Third row: Ramon A. Jaranilla, 
Leslie Black, Jo Harriett Hofsess, Bernice Neeley, Deloris Montague, 



The special project of Club Cervantes was a publi- 
cation for students studying Spanish. The organization 
sponsored Pan American Day, April 14, radio programs 
and social activities. The regular meetings included 
talks by Latin American students regarding their respec- 
tive countries, Spanish and English movies about Latin 
America, and musical programs. 

The 43 members of Club Cervantes are students 
who have nine semester hours of Spanish or the equiv- 
alent with an average grade of C or have a speaking 
knowledge of Spanish. Associate members need only 
to have shown an interest in Spanish. 

Club officers were president, Emilio Viale; vice- 
presidetn, Gloria Buckles; secretary, Mary F. Weaver; 
and treasurer, Migdonio Seidler. 

Cyrilka Roseberry, Emilio Viale. Second row: Leonard Redlinger, 
Gustavo Rosania, Bruno Linares, Fran Russell, Federico Torres, Raul 
Palacios. Front row: John C. Huenefeld, Sergio Cuculiza, Migedonio 
Seidler, John T. Sanchez, Ray E. Booth, Yezid de la Cuesta. 




89 




YOUNG REPUBLICANS CLUB— Back row: Dean Haddock, Joan 
Beggs, Connie Frizzell, Betty Byerly, Howard Wood, Ross Schimmels, 
Phyllis Martin. Third row: Gail Salisbury, Dwight Kortman, Robert 
Smith, Jordon Rexroot, Ralph Arnold, Norman Johnson, Bob Daly, 
William Hurst, Philip DePuy. Second row: Walter Gage, George 



Poelma, Ralph Salisbury, William Hausermann, Charles Eslinger, 
Clarence Imel, Burl Baker, Howard Sparks, Jesse Longwith, Shirley 
Braman. front row: Bob Sayler, Fred Kramer, Sidney Jagger, Merrick 
Lyman, Forris Frick, Edward Murray, Lyman Petersen, Max Friessen, 
Keith Venburg, O. O. Vieux, Robert King. 



Stir Interest in National Politics 



' 1 'HE purpose and membership requirements for the 
Young Republican Club are one and the same 
thing. This is the promoting of interest in the Repub- 
lican Party on the campus and giving students an oppor- 
tunity to participate in state and national politics. 

Groups sponsored an open forum to discuss current 
political problems. It was a special project of the club 
to educate students concerning the registration laws. 
Plans have been made to open campaign headquarters 
in Rec Center next fall. 

O. O. Vieux presided as chairman; Phyllis Evans, 
vice-chairman; R. I. Daly, secretary; and Howard 
Sparks, treasurer. 

The Young Republican Club was inactive during 



the war, but was organized in 1946. 

Members of the Young Democrats Club work to 
interest students in taking part in government through 
their party. At meetings twice a month, the members 
discused political policies. 

The group is a member of the state organization, 
Collegiate Young Democrat Clubs. Eight Kansas col- 
leges now belong. 

Charles L. Ryan, former president of the Washington 
Day Club, a state Democratic organization, was presi- 
dent of the campus group. C. H. Kongs was vice- 
president and Joan Aldous, secretary-treasurer. 





•Tt^ 



'•-.. : 




YOUNG DEMOCRATS CLUB 

— Back row: Mark Endsley, Ed- 
gar Engelken. Second row: Dal- 
las Sanderson, A. R. King, 
Charles Niernberger. Front row: 
Charles Ryan, James Noone. 



90 




PHEMS — Back row: Katherine Geyer, Donna Kraemer, Patty Warnick, 
Kathryn Robinson, Ada Ann Barton, Gloria Witt, Virginia Korne- 
mann. Third row: Pat Wilkinson, Norma Jean Wells, Dorothy Law- 
head, Marie Rock, Marguerite Nebergall, Jane Rogers, Olga Carrasas. 



Second row: Alice Becker, Edith Payne, Wanice Walker, Eva Lyman, 
Joyce Ecord, Marilyn Edwards, Darlene Lygrisse. Front row: Rebecca 
Tice, Darlene Meisner, Hannah Brown, Iris Dewhirst, Edwina Frick, 
Evelyn Platner, Joyce Darling, Gertrude Stork. 



Sports Interest Women's Groups 



YyrOMEN majoring in physical education have their 
own organization, Phems. It is the goal of the 
group to promote interest and professional growth in 
physical education and good will and friendship within 
the department. 

Monthly meetings alternate between a play night 
and outside speakers or professional projects. In the fall, 
members of Phems set out for a picnic, while their 
spring activity was a dinner honoring the seniors. 

The 35 members of Phems were under the leader- 
ship of Marie Rock, president; Darlene Lygrisse, vice- 
president; Gloria Witt, secretary-treasurer; Jane Rogers, 
program chairman. Since the reorganization of Phems 
in 1944, Katherine Geyer has been the faculty sponsor. 

The purpose of the Frog Club is to promote interest 

FROG CLUB — Back row: Alice Becker, Marguerite D. Nebergall, 
Jane Rogers, Patty S. Warnick, Joyce Pratt, Pat Wilkinson, Connie 
Frizzell. Second row: Marilyn Boice, Joanne Orr, Peggy McClay, 



and efficiency in swimming for the college women at 
K-State. With this in mind, the group sponsors one 
special swimming event each year in the form of a 
play day or swimming demonstration. 

The club is open to those women students who have 
passed the try-out and the improvement chart, and 
have shown active interest and sportsmanlike attitude 
in the Frog Club. 

Margaret McClay served as president with Marie 
Rock assisting her as secretary-treasurer. 

During the spring of 1947, the Frog Club held a 
swimming play day, entertaining women from the Uni- 
versity of Kansas and Washburn University. 

The Frog Club, organized in 1930, was inactive 
during the war, but since 1946 has taken an active 
part in campus affairs. A representative from Frog 
Club participated in the UNESCO organization. 

Mary Lou Harwood, Kathryn Robinson, Delia Ann Fox. Front row: 
Doris Ann Collins, Joan Frank, Connie Armitage, Edwina Frick, 
Norma L. Myers, Dorothy Lawhead, Marie Rock. 




91 




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Vtiitatl Sfoeam Ut 'JltouAaHm 



Miniature models, as well as life-size machines drew 
the attention of an estimated 25,000 persons at the annual 
Engineers' Open House this spring. Each year the 
sons of St. Patrick celebrate his birthday with a huge 
exhibition and dance. The Open House draws visitors 
from all parts of the state, and puts on display the 
newest advances in engineering for the public gaze. 
(Above) is a model of an oil field in the chemical engi- 
neering exhibit, and (left) is the winning exhibit of the 
Open House weekend, also from the Department of 
Chemical Engineering. 



, 




; 






BEER r 

BOT T LE 
L ORGAN 



In the Department of Applied Mechanics, curious 
laymen watched the testing of concrete blocks 
(above) as they were subjected to an enormous 
amount of pressure. Fascinating as an airplane cock- 
pit were all the dials and indicators. Catching the 
fancy of youngsters and adults alike was the beer 
bottle organ of the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. Nozzles with compressed air of dif- 
ferent pressures made the instrument tick, and con- 
tainers of the mellow brew resulted in mellow 
tones. 



fa &nCfiM,een.l' 0<p&n <Mo44,<be 



Perennially popular are the hamburgers fried on 
dry ice, which are just as much fun to eat as to 
watch cooking. Besieged by customers, hungry after 
the arduous Open House tour, the exhibit developed 
into a concession. All departments in the School of 
Engineering and Architecture made elaborate prep- 
arations for the weekend and were aided by the 
Department of Military Science which also gave 
demonstrations and exhibits at this time. 



93 





ENGINEERING COUNCIL— 

Back row: Ernest Sellers, M. A. 
Durland, Earl Garvin, Quentin 
Donnellan, John W. Green. 
Second row: Richard Medlin, 
Don D. Depew, David O. Wil- 
son, Earl Couchman, Richard 
Sizemore. Front row: Richard 
Finegan, Raymond C. Schneider, 
George Mahoney, Loyd E. Peter- 
son, Dewey Bondurant. 



Organizations Lead School Activities 



' I 'HE Engineering Council is the coordinating and 
advisory board for all K-State engineering associ- 
ations. It is the only unified body representing all 
branches of engineering. 

A regular meeting of the Council is held once a 
year and special meetings are called when necessary. 
It is the duty of this group to deal with matters affecting 
the School of Engineering as a whole. 

In addition to publishing the Kansas State Engineer, 
the special project of the organization was the revision 
of the constitution. 

Loyd Peterson served this year as president of the 
Engineering Council, and he was assisted by Ernest 
Sellers, vice-president; Richard Finegan, treasurer; Earl 
Couchman, secretary; Richard Sizemore, Open House 
chairman; John Parks, junior representative; and 
Murlin Hodgell, editor of the K. S. Engineer. The 



president of each separate association in the department 
is also a member of the Council. 

Alpha Phi Omega, fraternity for former Boy Scouts 
or those working with scouting, was reactivated at 
Kansas State College last fall for the first time since 
the war. The 35 members were busy all year with a 
variety of activities that included a Christmas Seal 
drive, Scout field day, Wildcat day last spring, Scout 
visitation for the Engineers' Open House, and a March 
of Dimes drive in February. 

John A. Tweed was president of the organization 
this year. James Pattinson and Richard Hardy were 
first vice-presidents. John Honstead was historian, and 
Wyatt Silker was alumni secretary. Don Simmons 
acted as sargeant of arms. Wayne Sieh, R. O. Pence, 
and A. T. Edwards were faculty advisors and William 
H. Honstead was scouting advisor. 




ALPHA PHI OMEGA— Back 
row: John Honstead, Donald 
Reinhardt, Richard Hardy, 
Ralph Eaton. Second row: How- 
ard Neighbor, John Tweed, 
Federico Torres R., Robert 
House, Robert Hahn. Front 
row: James Pattenson, Robert 
Weatherbie, Forris Frick, Dick 
Stockman, Walter Gage, Jr. 



94 




AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS— Top 
row: H. T. Biehl, J. W. Jones, Charles Hare, R. E. Hahn, Bedford 
Magnus, Edward Fischer, Loren Schroeder. Third row: Q. A. Donnel- 
lan, Claude Zink, R. M. Whitenack, E. M. Edwards, R. J. Osborn, 
Robert Freed, I. D. Lanier. Second row: C. R. Rolls, Charles Witten- 



born, Gerald Hines, Leon Mannell, Raymond Echmalzried, E. D. 
Spencer, Henry Fichtner. Front row: J. D. Pattinson, Phil Burns, 
Ralph Naslund, E. E. Mulkey, F. V. Harshbarger, A. M. Chrisman, 
Paul C. Hansen, L. J. Mertz, John Knowles. 



Wide Purpose Given to Engineering Group 



' 1 'HE purpose of the Student Branch of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers is to promote good 
fellowship among students enrolled in electrical engi- 
neering; to furnish up-to-date information on electrical 
subjects of current importance; to acquaint under- 
graduate students with the parent AIEE organization; 
and to furnish programs and speakers on interesting 
electrical matters. The membership of the AIEE at K- 
State is approximately 90. Any student enrolled in the 
electrical engineering curriculum is eligible for member- 
ship. 

Leadership in AIEE was provided by Quentin A. 
Donnellan, president; Clarence R. Rolls, vice-president; 
Phillip D. Burns, recording secretary; James R. Pfeffer, 
treasurer; and Robert A. Freed, marshall. Joe E. Ward, 
Jr., was the faculty sponsor. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS— Top 
row: Bill Harper, L. D. Cosgrove, J. R. Pfeffer, George Leasure, Ed 
Rutschmann, T. Vanderwilt. Third row: Glenn Utt, James Jordan, K. 
R. Adrian, Ted Clark, C. E. Heggy, J. H. Brown. Second row: Prof. 



Three representatives and one faculty member at- 
tended the annual district meeting of AIEE last year 
held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Student papers 
were entered for competitive prizes at the district meet- 
ing. 

The annual smoker or party held by the members of 
the organization took place during the spring semester. 
AIEE sponsored an electrical exhibit as a part of the 
annual Engineers' Open House and also entered a float 
in the Homecoming parade. 

The Student Branch of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers has 127 divisions in the United 
States. Meetings are held approximately twice a month. 
These organizations are a part of the American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers, the largest professional 
electrical .engineering organization at the present time. 

J. E. Ward, K. R. Shogren, I. T. McLaughlin, Arch G. Cousins, 
James Farrar, Floyd Jones, Wallace Anderson, K. S. Decker. Front 
row: L. J. Allen, Dan Skelton, L. R. Clark, Loran Arnold, Louis Cable, 
Don Rader, David Leslie, A. H. Getty. 




95 



1 
m 








STUDENT ARCHITECTS ASSOCIATION— Back row: Dudley Wil- 
liams, Raymond Kieffer, Winston Schmidt, Paul Weigel, Quincy 
Jackson, Ted Jones, Florence Dubbs. Third row: Harold Hill, Don 
Stevens, Martin Anglemyer, John Schruben, James Beckett, William 
Ramsey, James Matthews, Thomas Langford. Second row: Richard 



Hanson, Dale Dronberger, Don Depew, Jack Webber, Richard Size- 
more, Frederick Johnston, Eugene Spaun, Dewi Hopkins, Carl John- 
son. Front row: Ray Hutchins, Raymond Schnieder, Nels Anderson, 
Jr., Joseph Schwartzman, Galen Low, Theodore Chadwick, Lawrence 
McManis, Richard Swanson, Donald Ransom. 



Groups Compete with Exhibits at 



TD EPLACING the American Institute of Architects, 
Student Branch, was the Student Architects Associ- 
ation, open only to seniors in architecture or architec- 
tural engineering. 

Activities of the Student Architects Association in- 
cluded a one day inspection trip to Kansas City, a 
smoker with the faculty, an exhibition gallery, Home- 
coming float, and an Open House committee. 

The organization was under the direction of Don 
Depew, president; Fred Johnston, vice-president; James 
Matthews, secretary; Donald Ransom, treasurer. Sec- 
ond semester leadership was assumed by Fred Johnston, 
president; Galen Low, vice-president; James Beckett, 
secretary; Don Ransom, treasurer. 



INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS— Back row: Gabe Sellers, 
Eugene Shapiro, Wilfred Hillstrom, Kenneth Adrian, Robert Harrison, 
John Parks, Roy Davis, Robert Guipre, K. H. Martin. Third row: 
John Holoway, Robert Heline, John Green, George Park, Jerome Hill, 
John Bushnell, William Comfort, John Cooper. Second row: Warren 



The first major project of the newly organized 
Kansas State College Branch of the Institute of Radio 
Engineers was organizing, planning and executing elec- 
trical engineering exhibits during Open House. 

One of the younger organizations on the campus, 
the Institute of Radio Engineers was granted a charter 
from the national organization this fall. Prior to the 
spring of 1947 the club existed only as the electrical 
engineering seminar. Any student enrolled in electrical 
engineering or related fields is eligible for membership. 

John M. Bushnell, Jr., served as the organization's 
first chairman, with Robert E. Heline, vice-chairman; 
Gabe A. Sellers, Jr., secretary; and John F. Holloway, 
treasurer. 



Oshel, Edward Fischer, Kenneth Hewson, James Hadley, Jack Hoefer, 
Kenneth Fultz, Wendell Lind, Wayne Mohr. front row: Robert Casey, 
Victor Schwartz, Eugene Jaedicke, Richard Clarke, James Andrisevic, 
Daniel Reed, Arthur Cotts. 




96 




AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS— Back 
row: Joseph Bettinger, Bruce Madden, Norman Woolgar, Frank Ham- 
lin, John Peterson, Frank Richards, William English. Third row: 
Robert Clary, John Hemphill, Warren Lovendahl, Mary Rood, 
Lloyd Gafford, Richard Brooks, Donald Logan. Second row: Jean 



Burton, Arthur Billiard, Delbert Longfellow, Orville Barnes, Don 
Vickers, Charles Shannon, Glen Barb, Dale Carter. Front row: Bernard 
Rottinghaus, David O. Wilson, Jack Ranck, Robert Lorson, Fred 
Lindsey, John H. Anderson, Albert Haron, Dwight Parken. 



Annual Engineers' Open House 



/~\RGANIZED to interest students in phases of engi- 
neering not covered by their college courses, the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers met twice 
a month to hear speakers from industry or the engineer- 
ing faculty. 

In May, some of the members entered a contest 
sponsored by the regional A. S. M. E. in Tulsa, Okla. 
The entrants wrote papers on any field of engineering. 
K-State A. S. M. E. members have won this contest six 
times in the last ten years, with a member placing 
every year. Schools in competition in the contest are 
the University of Nebraska, University of Kansas, 
K-State, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma A. and M. 
College, and the University of Arkansas. 



Don Vickers was chairman of the mechanical engi- 
neering exhibit at Open House. He was also chairman 
in charge of the Homecoming float. 

Every year, the Society makes an award to the 
member of the department judged most outstanding. 
Richard Fedell was given the award, the Kent Hand- 
book Series, in 1947. 

David Wilson was chairman of the A. S. M. E. the 
first semester. Mary Helen Rood was secretary and 
Frank Richards was treasurer. 

During the second semester Norman Woolgar served 
as chairman, Lynn Alford was vice-chairman, Mary 
Helen Rood was secretary and Richard Brooks was 
treasurer. Prof. Boyd Brainard was faculty sponsor. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS— Bach, row: 
Henry Babcock, Dale Olsen, Frederick Reinhardt, Darrell Wortrnan, 
Jack Harmon, Donald Knopf, Carson Condry, Paul Giovagnoli. Third 
row: Earl Delay, Philip Eward, Frank Schweiger, Alan Carlson, Dale 
Bowlin, Vincent Van Sickel, John Crabb. Second row: Harold Pier- 



point, Lynn Alford, Dick Fedell, Harold Skala, Harold McCauley, 
Glenn Springer, Charles Goss, Darrell Landau, front row: William 
Mount, Paul Tomshany, Carl Holt, Gerald Conely, Roland Case, John 
Shupe, Robert Shaw, Boyd Brainard. 




97 



Civil Engineers Have Full Program 



'""T'HE Engineers' Open House was the big event of the 
year for the members of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. George Mahoney was chairman and 
Edgar Johnson was faculty advisor of the civil engi- 
neer's exhibit. The main display was models showing 
different types of dams and their uses. The progress 
from beaver dams through dirt dams to multi-purpose 
dams for the storage of water and the control of floods 
was shown. Bob Muchow, Fred Peterson, Stephen 
James and Charles Smith were in charge of the exhibit. 
Displays of photogrammetry equipment — used for sur- 
veying by photography — and of other surveying equip- 
ment, were handled by Galen Dawson and Al Lind- 
holm. 

Sophomores in civil engineering were included in the 
A. S. C. E. this year for the first time. 

The Kansas State A. S. C. E. is a student chapter 
of the national organization. The College chapter gives 
the students a chance to contact practicing engineers 
and to discover the opportunities open to them in their 
field. 

The 210 members met the second and fourth Thurs- 
days of each month to hear prominent practicing engi- 
neers. George Acree, former student in the civil engi- 
neering department, spoke at one meeting on the plans 
for the Harry S. Truman Bridge northeast of Kansas 
City. 



Another speaker was Col. William Everett Potter, 
army engineer working on the Missouri Valley Basin 
Plan who discussed the plan with the members. 

In October, the seniors and some of the juniors took 
an inspection trip to Topeka. They visited the city 
water works and the State Highway Department. The 
students inspected the widening and improvement of 
Highway 75 south of Topeka. The Santa Fe shops, 
largest in the world for the repair of locomotives, and 
the Goodyear Rubber Company were other stops on 
the trip. 

Joint Meeting 

The K-State chapter held a joint meeting with the 
University of Kansas chaper in March. Members of the 
society from over the state also attended the evening 
meeting and dinner. John Parcel, from a St. Louis 
firm, spoke to the group about the rebuilding of the 
Tacoma Narrows bridge in Washington, the third 
largest extension bridge in the world. 

During the fall semester, George Mahoney was presi- 
dent; Dewey Young, vice-president, Paul Jorgenson, 
secretary; and Winston F. Littlefield was treasurer. 

Emmett John Warren was president the spring semes- 
er. Fred Peterson was vice-president, Walter E. Pellett, 
secretary, and Paul A. Johnson was treasurer. Prof. F. 
F. Frazier was faculty advisor of the organization. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS— Back row: Donald 
Gerard, John Brewer, Robert Wertenberger, George Sigsbee, Winston 
Littlefield, Robert Santner, Richard Fuller, Bob Smith, Robert Clark, 
John Roberts. Third row: Stephen James, Linton Ward, Frank Hoff- 
mans, Paul Johnson, John Tweed, Panfilo Pace, Benn Cowan, Keith 
Cantrell, Paul Jorgenson, R. L. Baier. Second row: Dick Leaird, Irvin 



Barnett, Keith Cook, Raymond Hommon, Dewey Young, Ernest Ful- 
ton, Earll Dudley, George Wilkie, Lee Gregory, Mike Zeleznak. Front 
tow: Leonard Imhof, Emmett Warren, Loyd Peterson, George Ma- 
honey, Ernest Lindholm, Maurice Tjaden, Galen Dawson, Fred 
Kramer, Harry Brown, Freeman Vicory. 




98 



with Trips, Speeches, Open House 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 
ENGINEERS — Back row: Gayle 
Achterberg, M. M. Mayse, William 
Mierau, Floyd Hazlett. Third row: 
Walter Matthews, Gerald Farley, 
Wallace Fox, Eldon Hampl, John 
Mason. Second row: Rolland Chand- 
ler, William Baetz, Victor Crotinger, 
William Markey, Frank Eaton, Gail 
Bierly. Front row: William Hart, 
Richard Lill, Floyd Dorsey, Wil- 
liam Ansdell, Charles Lagergren, 
Cliff Heckathorn, James Hillabrant. 





4 J4^ 



Li 



I ■/ 



r 

% 






AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 
ENGINEERS — Back row: Ralph 
Newman, prank Jenkins, William 
Predmore, Charles Vaughan. Third 
row: James Ruthrauff, George Mor- 
ris, Everett Taylor, LaMarr Smith, 
Jay Rexroad. Second row: William 
Thruston, Flavel Simcox, Charles 
Powers, Walter Pellett, Frederick 
Peterson, Roy Oswald, Jr. Front row: 
Ralph Walker, Ralph Vollbracht, 
Harold Rutherford, Harry Shannon, 
Robert Tinsley, Horace Crow. 




AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 
ENGINEERS — Back row: Charles 
Denison, Kenneth Kauffman, Elvin 
Crockett, Wilbur Gaughan, Harold 
Brown. Third row: William Drees, 
OIlie Demous, Julius Harmon, Rich- 
ard Hus, Jack Fisher, Dean Heiser. 
Second row: Joseph Grady, Robert 
Hein, Paul Davies, Marvin Kramer, 
Harlan Kamm, Lloyd Handlin. Front 
row. John Donmyer, Harold Cary, 
Charles Hanson, William Gilbert, 
Joseph Fagg, Merrill Everson. 




AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 
ENGINEERS — Back row: Stuart 
Martin, Clifford Meredith, Dayton 
Molzen, Warren White, Dwaine 
Nault. Third row: Carroll Nelson, 
Raymond Steinbacher, Marvin Ratts, 
Eugene Rasmusson, Richard Peter- 
son, Richard Morse. Second row: 
Thomas Roach, James Williams, 
Winfield Pearson, Wesley Wendt, 
William Powell, V. L. Stallbaumer. 
Front row: Paul Schwartz, D. W. 
O'Neil, Charles N. Smith, Wayne 
Lander, Kermit Matthews, John Wal- 
lick. 



99 





I 



I 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS— Back 

rote: Howard C. Wood, Jay West, Jalal Jaber, Phillip Hurd, John 
Crouse, Keith Dombaugh, Russell Herpich, Alton Coble, Arthur 
Miller, Lavern Goltl. Second row: James Cody, Marshall Walker, 
James Bondurant, Vernon Olsen, Kenneth Hanson, John Downie, Jr., 



Samuel Huber, Marne Karlin, Jared Barker, Michael Mailhiot. Front 
row: Robert Sayler, Martin Decker, Ross Doyen, Richard Hanson, 
Harold Stanton, George Teneyck, Theodore Gault, Carl Anderson, 
Donald Kiper, Don Pepoon. 



Engineering Societies Work Toward 



CPONSORING the farm mechanics contest for high 
school boys during Vocational Ag Week was an 
important activity of the American Society of Agricul- 
tural Engineers this year. The society gave awards to the 
three high men in the contest. 

Open House was a big affair for the society mem- 
bers too. Many A. S. A. E. displays and exhibits covered 
different phases of ag engineering. Exhibits on soil 
conservation were under the direction of Bernard Pierce, 
chairman. Farm structures and farm machinery ex- 
hibits were planned by chairman Don Miller and James 
Francis. Gene Bohnenblust was in charge of the rural 
electrification displays. 

The A. S. A. E. gives an award to the ag engineer 
judged most outstanding during his freshman and 
sophomore years. Richard Newcomb won the award, a 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS— Back 

row: Harry C. Brown, Richard Spencer, Harry Manges, James Francis, 
Fred Bruenger, Richard Newcomb, Ralph Spomer, Melford DeWald, 
Maurice McDaniel. Second row: James Mason, Franklin Kinsey, Lewis 



scholarship, in 1947. 

The society met twice a month to hear addresses by 
prominent men in the field of ag engineering, or by 
faculty members in the department. 

During the fall semester Dewey Bondurant was 
president. Walter Olson was vice-president and Francis 
Billiard was secretary-treasurer. Fred Bruenger was 
scribe. 

Gene Bohnenblust served as president of the society 
during the spring semester, with Lewis Martin as vice- 
president, James Francis as secretary and treasurer and 
Alan Berndt as scribe. 

The membership of the society increased by almost 
half, this year bringing the total to 69 persons. Prof. 
F. C. Fenton was sponsor of the group. 

Martin, Elmer Rigle, Joe Hodgson, Bernard Pierce, Dale Barb, Gene 
Bohnenblust, Maurice Johnson. Front row: Walter Olson, Francis 
Billiard, Joel Wentz, Gustave Fairbanks, Charles Edwards, George 
Larson, Paul Lyman, Dewey Bondurant, Don Miller. 




100 






' / 




AMERICAN INSTITUE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS— Back row: 
Ed Nease, Robert F. Arnold, Melvin Barb, Willis Hart, John Hon- 
stead, Capnot Bellinger, John McClintock, Samuel Jolly, Tennyson 
Collins. Third row: Raymond Gibson, Bob Pollom, Joe Nathan, 
George Weekley, Arthur Hiser, Robert A. Schmidt, Harvey Spencer, 
Elmer D. Jones, Lowell Shireman, Ernest Holmes. Second row: 



Wiliam Elbl, Hugh Kirkpatrick, Clyde Hinman, Wiliam Ketterman, 
Louis McGovern, Leonard Wood, Bill Rieg, Robert McHarg, Calvin 
Johnson, Earl Couchman. Front row: Ben Cathers, Fred Kays, Richard 
Medlin, Franklin Fenton, John Swanson, Lawrence Adee, Louis 
Rotar, Charles Kaiser, Glenn Hudson, Clayton Nattier, Leonard 
Luehring. 



Professional Standards Promotion 



'T'HE AMERICAN Institute of Chemical Engineers, 
student chapter of a national technical society, 
has as its purpose, the fellowship and promotion of the 
professional standing of the members. 

The society met once a month this year, to hear 
speakers, either prominent chemical engineers, or fac- 
ulty members from the department, discuss technical 
subjects. At some of the meetings, they saw motion 
pictures of industrial projects in order to get acquainted 
with various phases of chemical engineering that are 
not covered in college courses. 

The institute makes an award to the sophomore who 
had the highest standing during his freshman year 
and to the junior who maintained the highest standing 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS— Back 
row: William Honstead, Charles T. Payne, Robert Hamilton, Albert 
Sachen, Donald Kobbeman, Eugene Kenney, Robert Meyer, Elliott 
Morse, Walter Smith, Alfred Ponte, Kenneth Pricer. Third row: 
James E. Smith, Howard Kordes, Bernard E. Clark, Richard Alexander, 
Dwight Heffelbower, Joe Altepeter, Eugene Ross, John Stewart, John 
McKeen, Robert Yoder, Edwin Griffith. Second row: Thomas Over- 



throughout his freshman and sophomore years. The 
Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, the freshman 
award, was given to oje C. Hasslet this year. Melvin 
Barb won the junior award, the Perry Chemical Engi- 
neer's Handbook. 

Richard Medlin was president of the society during 
the fall semester, with Leonard Luehring as vice-presi- 
dent. Frank Fenton was secretary, Harvey Spencer was 
treasurer and Robert Schmidt was program chairman. 

The second semester, James Gretzinger was elected 
president. Bob Meyer was vice-president and Ernest 
Pence was secretary. Melvin Barb served as treasurer 
and Robert Arnold was progam chairman. 

Prof. William H. Honstead sponsored the group. 

ton, Wilber Cole, Reginald Asher, Harmon Orsborn, Herbert Timm, 
Verlyn Reneau, James Gretzinger, Lewis Larson, Wendell Dornan, 
Lloyd Krone, Irvin Middleton, Richard Rose. Front row: Dewey Hus- 
ton, Duane Barney, Richard Atkinson, William Ellis, Melville Marnix, 
Neil Haflich, Vernon Minor, Harold D. Smith, Gale Willis, Laurence 
Gnagy, Howard Wood. 




O C^ O ™ ^\ 




&m r**9«tf_ 



101 




HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 
COUNCIL— Back row: Mil- 
dred Hall, Eugenia Beezley, 
Janice Carnahan, Laverna 
Lenharr. Second row: Mary 
Meili, Martha Adee, Kathryn 
Brainard, Enid Keiswetter, 
Velma Weaver. Front row: 
Mary Weaver, Louise Mosier, 
Clarice Cooper, G e o r g i n e 
Bischoff, Patricia Baker. 



Home Economics Leaders Busy 



' I f HE Executive Council of the Home Economics 
Club acts as a governing board for the five clubs 
that make up the Margaret Justin Home Economics 
Club, named for the Dean of the School. The Council 
is composed of the elected officers, standing committee 
chairmen, the chairmen of each of the five club groups 
and the club adviser. 

Kathryn Brainard was president and Miss Margaret 
Raffington was faculty adviser this year. Mary Ann 
Weaver served as vice-president, Mary Jane Meili as 
secretary and treasurer and Mildred Hall as lecture 
board chairman. 

Members of the Council who were chairmen of club 
groups were Mary Jane Meili from the Publicity Club; 
Clarice Cooper from the Service Club; Enid Keiswetter 
representing the Radio Club; Velma Weaver represent- 



ing the Nursing Club; and Janice Carnahan from the 
Freshman Club. 

Guiding freshmen in Home Economics during the 
fall semester is the work of the Home Economics Fresh- 
men Counselors. There are no officers in the group 
but the vice president of the Home Economics Club is 
head counselor. Mary Ann Weaver was head counselor 
this year. 

Chosen by a student committee for their ability to 
work with people and for their satisfactory scholarship, 
the counselors are selected and trained in the spring 
for their work the next fall. Miss Margaret Raffington, 
faculty adviser, directs the counselors. 

Each of the counselors meets regularly with a group 
of freshman girls to aid them in orientation and with 
school problems. 




HOME ECONOMICS COUN- 
SELORS— Back row: Marilyn 
Jones, Patricia Redmond, 
Eugenia Beezley, Mary Hix, 
Barbara Baker, Enid Keis- 
wetter. Third row: Barbara 
Carttar, Dorothy Bebermeyer, 
Audrey Schmitt, Olive Brain- 
ard, Laberta Kugler, Norma 
Magnus, Alvera Reynolds. 
Second row: Virginia Shrake, 
Frances Davitt, Rosalie Ger- 
mann, Patricia Baker, Mary 
Meili, Donna Ashlock, Car- 
olyn Voran. Front row: Louise 
Mosier, Mary Weaver, Clarice 
Cooper, Joan Georg, Kathryn 
Gates, Miriam Dunbar, Janice 
Miller. 



102 



HOSPITALITY DAYS STEER- 
ING COMMITTEE — Back 
row: Barbara Cartrar, Willa 
Deanne Mills, Jeanie Beez- 
ley, Carolyn Glover, June 
Sorenson. Second row: Mary 
Ann Bebermeyer, Margaret E. 
Raffington, Louise Mosier, 
Donna Ashlock, Mary Jane 
Meili, Julia Gardner. Front 
row: Loreta Sricklin, Marilyn 
Larson, Ruthann Loomis, Mae 
Weaver, Clarice Cooper. 




With Projects and Guidance 



TTUNDREDS of high school girls from all parts of 
the state were guests of the School of Home Eco- 
nomics during Hospitality Days, April 16-17, this year. 

Sponsored by the home economics clubs to show the 
type of work being done in the departments of home 
economics, many new phases of teaching and research 
were demonstrated. All home economics women have 
an opportunity to display their work to visitors from 
the campus and community and especially to the high 
school girls from over the state who attend the annual 
event. Teas, style shows, demonstrations and displays 
are planned for the guests. The Hospitality Hop marked 
the end of the celebration. 

A steering committee composed of chairmen of all 
Hospitality Days committees planned the event and 
was headed by general chairman, Louise Mosier. Miss 



Margaret Raffington acted as general adviser to the 
steering committee. 

The Home Economics Radio Club gives all women 
in home economics who are interested in radio a chance 
to write and broadcast their own scripts. This year the 
club sponsored a 15 -minute program over KSAC on 
the second Saturday of each month. The program dealt 
with various phases of home economics. Some of the 
subjects were flower arrangements, nutrition and meal 
planning. 

The club had 3 3 members this year and elected Enid 
Keiswetter as its president. Rosalie Germann was vice- 
president and Laberta Kugler was secretary and treas- 
urer. 

Any woman enrolled in home economics may belong 
to the club. 



HOME ECONOMICS RADIO 
CLUB — Back row: Lois Mor- 
gan, Joyce Pratt, Jeanne 
Roach, Enid Keiswetter, Mary 
Guerrant, Connie McGinness, 
Second row: Margaret Jett, 
Barbara Carttar, Shirley Scott, 
Louise Barnes, Laberra Kug- 
ler, Betty Hinkhouse. Front 
row: Audrey Schmitt, Averil 
Hawes, Margaret Hodler, Ros- 
alie Germann, Patiy Went- 
worth, Ruth Schultz. 




103 




HOME ECONOMICS PUB- 
LICITY CLUB — Back roiu: 
Harriet Woolley, Beverly Loy, 
Darilene Hague, Marilyn 
Jones, Patricia Redmond. 
Third row: Virginia Grand- 
field, Betty Warren,, Barbara 
Garver, Evelyn Bowman, L. 
V. Baker, Carrol Ramsey. 
Second row: Mildred Bitts, 
Margaret R u s s e 1, Phyllis 
Wheatley, Helen Hostetter, 
Vadaline Strobel, Nancy Berry. 
Front row: Madonna Wool- 
ley, Donna Ashlock, Mary 
Helen Gunning, Mary Jane 
Meili, Kathleen Eyman, Lor- 
eta Stricklin, Marilyn Bush. 



Home Ec Clubs Stress Service, 



T)UBLICITY for the activities of the Home Economics 
Club is in the hands of the 26 members of the 
Home Economics Publicity Club, under the direction 
of Miss Iva M. Mullen and Prof. Helen Hostetter. 
Twice a year the club publishes a booklet, The Betty 
Lamp, which describes the various activities of the 
Home Ec Club. The booklet is distributed among 
home ec women and is sent to high school girls 
throughout the state. The members also sell packets 
of recipes that they have collected from their courses. 
Mary Jane Meili was president of the club this year 
and Loreta Stricklin was vice-president. Margaret Rus- 
sel, and Kathleen Eyman were recording and corres- 
ponding secretaries. 



This year members of the Home Economics Nursing 
Club traveled to Kansas City to tour the University of 
Kansas Medical Center. Membership in this organi- 
zation is open to any student enrolled in home eco- 
nomics and nursing, and of the 49 students in that 
curriculum, 29 comprise the Home Ec Nursing Club. 
An exhibit during the Hospitality Days was sponsored 
by the Nursing Club. 

A business meeting and program were held the third 
Thursday of each month. 

The Nursing Club was headed by Velma Weaver, 
president; Dorothy Long, vice-president; Suzanne Swar- 
ner, secretary-treasurer; and Mary C. Brakebill, social 
chairman. 



HOME ECONOMICS NURSING CLUB— Back row: Marjorie Jo 
Loomis, Marilu Woodruff, Helen Weissbeck, Suzanne Swarner, Guyla 
Love, Mary Wood, Donis Clary. Third row: Lois Slifer, Bernita 
Stoecker, Phyllis Hall, Joyce Hansen, Carolyn Stein, Lillian Lacy, 
Loine Betz, Velma Weaver. Second row: Marjorie Theissen, Melva 



Toothaker, Nancy Lamborn, Elizabeth Perkins, Mona Dishman, Mary 
Brakebill, Joyce Anderson, Esther Phillips. Front row: Carolyn Bishop, 
Marjorie Honstead, Kathryn Larson, Esther Aspelin, Frances Murphy, 
Nancy Casement. 




104 



HOME ECONOMICS SERV- 
ICE CLUB— Back row: Helen 
Cazier, Alice Kerbs, Jean 
Ward. Third row: Mary Jo 
Griffith, Eleanor Bell, Dolores 
Knapp, Thelma Stadel, Jane 
Keith. Second row: Faye Con- 
verse, Shirley Bynum, Doris 
Downing, Esther Page, Helen 
Todd, Vivian Hawley. Front 
row: Clarice Cooper, Louise 
Mosier, Kate Clark, Shirley 
Braman, Kathryn Gates, Joy 
Reinhardt, Marilyn Keeshan. 




Information and Leadership Goals 



"\ /TAKING curtains for the new Student Union was 
an important project of the Home Economics 
Service Club. The club also prepared layettes for the 
Foreign Friendship Service and did some work for the 
Red Cross. The club is open to any woman enrolled 
in home economics. Its purpose is to find and make 
use of opportunities for service. 

Clarice Cooper served as president of the club with 
Helen Cazier as vice-president. Mary Jo Griffith was 
secretary-treasurer; and Esther Page was program chair- 
man. Miss Ruth Gates and Miss Rita Powell were 
sponsors. 

FRESHMAN HOME ECONOMICS CLUB— Back row: Bonnie Reed, 
Lola Keech, Mary Lou Edwards, Janice Carnahan, Betty Chelstrom, 
Jeanne Warren, Virginia Bules, Margaret Lagasse, Versa Mansfield, 
Bonnie Mallory, Rosemary Wright. Fourth row: Margaret Cotton, 
Willa Hay, Mildred Johnson, Theresa Navinskey, Helen Stricklin, 
Alice Baker, Genevieve Reed, Pat Moffett, Mary Lou Bair, Lois Bill- 
ington, Betty Butler, Alys Reeder. Third row: Helen L. Spears, Margie 



Any girl who is a freshman enrolled in the School of 
Home Economics is eligible for membership in the 
Freshman Home Economics Club. This club was organ- 
ized in 1942 with the purpose of furthering interest in 
home economics and providing an opportunity for girls 
to develop and display leadership. Formerly a part 
of a larger home ec organization, the freshman girls 
formed a club of their own. 

The Freshman Home Ec Club officers this year were 
president, Janice Carnahan; vice-president, Donna Gies; 
secretary-treasurer, Vera Mansfield; song leader, Ellen 
Johnson; and social chairman, Carol Croft. 

Pishny, Phyllis Birk, Louise Neises, Molly Weathers, Sara Stockwell, 
Patricia Hale, Doris Hopkins, Donna Hill, Carol Hoyt, Christine 
Allen. Second row: Twila Oltjen, Mary Wendland, JoAnn Blackman, 
Donna Gies, Carol Craft, Esther Gibson, Cynthia Morrish, Kathleen 
Gee, Iolene Morrison, JoAnne Wolgast, Barbara Miller, Phyllis Van 
Vliet. Front row: Fannie West, Monita McNeill, LaVerne Dewees, 
Marjorie Faris, Delores Knoche, Rosemary Blackwell. 




105 



Vet Wives Organize for Study and Play 



'T'WO organizations for students' wives were on the 
campus this year — the Veterans' Wives Club which 
has been active since 1945 and the Students' Wives 
Educational Association which was organized last Janu- 
ary. 

Members of the Veterans' Wives Club were kept 
busy this year with several activities as well as their 
regular business meetings once a month. They had 
bridge instructions from Dr. A. G. Pickett and lessons 
in knitting from Mrs. Robert Conover. The club 
joined with the Students' Wives Education Association 
in sponsoring a handicrafts class where they did work 
with copper foil, leather tooling and textile painting. 

In April, the 70 members met in the city park for 
a picnic. During the year they gave several parties 
for their husbands and families. 

The Vet Wives Club also helped organize the baby 
lending library. Mrs. C. H. Faubion has charge now 
of the lending and exchanging of baby beds, chairs, 
pens and bassinets and other baby equipment. 

Mrs. A. A. Foltz, Mrs. L. E. Melchers, and Mrs. C. 
H. Faubion are sponsors of the club. 

The Students' Wives Educational Association was 
organized with the help of Miss Ellen Batchelor of the 
extension division, so that the wives might have in- 
struction in the subjects they were interested in while 
their husbands were in school. The executive committee 
set up a program including instruction in interior 




KNIT AWHILE, GOSSIP AWHILE— have a good time— or at least that 
is what the Veterans' Wives Club seems to be doing in one of their 
regular meetings. 



decoration, making temporary furniture, child welfare, 
solving storage problems and in buying meats. Instruc- 
tors from the extension division and from the other 
branches of the College staff taught the classes. Some 
of the members took a Red Cross home nursing course 
in the spring. The club is planning a nursery for the 
housing units this summer. 

Membership in the association has risen to more 
than 125. 

Oficers in the association are Mrs. Wyman White, 
president; Mrs. William Langworthy, vice-president; 
Mrs. Benjamin Ray, secretary; Mrs. James Burgess, 
treasurer; and Mrs. Wallace Moyle, reporter. Miss 
Batchelor acts as sponsor for the group. 



VETERAN'S WIVES CLUB— Back row: Jeanne Lambert, Madeline 
Abramczyk, Dorothy Russell, Mary Jacka, Diehl Clark, Ernestine 
Demott, Lorene Leslie, June Sizemore. Third row: Theresa Herpich, 
Pauline Lingren, Venetta Arganbright, Louise Sharpsteen, Phyllis 
Davis, Doris Prentice, Mary Ann Harbecke, Ilene Allen, Phyllis 



Sturdevant. Second roiv: Arleta Barber, Joanne White, Dixie Roberts, 
Barbara Ogden, Donna Cooley, Betty Sack, Evelyn Linn, Phyllis Bow- 
lin, Loretta Newkirk. Front row: Juanita Jordan, Elsie Bayles, Doro- 
thy Hetzler, Laura Quakenbush, Darlene Conover, Nathalie Elswood, 
Marjorie Anderson, Jean Petrie, Marjorie Graham, Frances Babb. 




106 



A.V.MA. Sets TwoFold Objective 



'T""'HE K-State Junior A.V.M.A., a student branch 
of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 
has a double purpose. The first objective of the assoc- 
iation is the professional development and technical 
training of its members. The second goal is concerned 
with the social and literary training of vet students. 
The society acts as a supplement to class work and aca- 
demic activities. 

Any student who is regularly enrolled in the four 
year professional curriculum in the School of Veterinary 
Medicine may be a prospective member for the Junior 
A.V.M.A. However, before students may achieve this 
classification, they must meet certain scholastic stand- 
ards while enrolled in a pre-vet course in the School of 
Arts and Sciences. These students are not eligible 
for membership in the association. This year the society 
had 199 active members, but the group claimed no 
graduating seniors. The absence of a 1948 senior class 
was brought about by the transition from the speeded- 
up war-time educational program to the normal sched- 
ule. 

Capable Officers 

During the first semester the organization was under 
the leadership of Jacob D. Fortenberry, who served 
as president and was assisted by Leonard H. Winn, 
president-elect; Donald Crogan, vice-president; John 



P. Hughes, secretary; Tom B. Watson, treasurer; Ned 
W. Rokey, critic; and L. J. Barger, marshall. 

Second semester Leonard H. Winn took over the 
presidency, with John H. Woolsey chosen president- 
elect; Sidney Marlin, vice-president; Harold P. Peffley, 
secretary; Tom B. Watson, treasurer; Bernard Mowery, 
critic; Ben R. Brake, marshall. 

The regular activities of the Junior A.V.M.A. in- 
clude meetings twice each month during the school 
year. Ordinarily the meetings are held in the evenings. 
The programs usually consist of an outstanding speaker 
of state or national repute who brings to the students 
a worthwhile message from the realm of professional 
work. It is customary for the senior veterinary students 
to bring to the underclassmen an account of their pro- 
fessional experinces as interns during the preceeding 
summer vacation. 

Each program features something in the way of 
musical, literary, or other cultural entertainment. At 
intervals during the school year the Junior A.V.M.A. 
sponsors dances as a part of the social program. At the 
end of the spring semester the annual Junior A.V.M.A. 
banquet is held. Approximately 500 persons attend 
the traditional function. The yearly award of prizes 
for those who have shown academic excellence is 
presnted at this time. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE JUNIORS— Back row: Nathan Gelbart, 
Dale Martin, Tom Watson, Worth Larson, Glen Harbert. Third row: 
Douglas Merritt, Hyman Saperstein, Richard Cain, Joe McGinity, 
George Klover, Richard Knilans. Second row: Stanley Jacobs, Dave 



Mackintosh, D. L. Croghan, James Davis, John Templeton. Front row: 
Lyle Boley, Jacob Fortenberry, Howard Jones, John Goforth, Paul 
Doby, Leonard Winn. 




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Vets Initiate 60 Members in Fall 



'""pHE evening of October 8, 1947, the active mem- 
bers of the Kansas State College Junior Chapter of 
the American Veterinary Medical Association held init- 
iation services for more than 60 new members. The 
ceremony, conducted by the upperclassmen, was im- 
pressive and worthy of the best traditions of this 
strictly professional group of college men and women. 
After the initiation, refreshments or doughnuts and 
cider were served with a general good fellowship meet- 
ing closing the evening session. 

Founded in 1906 

The Junior A.V.M.A., the popular name for the 



organization, was instigated as the Veterinary Medical 
Association on October 20, 1906, at a meeting of the 
veterinary medicine students in Room 51 of Fairchild 
Hall. The same year saw the Association firmly estab- 
lished under a state charter as a responsible association 
having fixed privileges and purposes. 

During the 42 years the Junior A.V.M.A. has been 
active at K-State, it has progressed from a small, 
struggling group to a well-established campus organi- 
zation. Ten of the charter members are still living, 
and most of them are active in some professional field. 
Three Kansas State Junior A.V.M.A founders reside in 
Kansas. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE JUNIORS— Back row: Gabriel Gonzalez, 
Joe Weis, Edwin Kay, George Stewart, Jr., Martin Obrecht, George 
Chaffee, Harold Mersky. Third row: James Pooley, William Santoro, 
Charles Wempe, Irvin Darling, Bernard Lehman, Ivan Osborn. Second 



row: Cornelius Horan, Murray Pollack, Cecil Wells, Jr., John Aiken, 
Frank Fishburn, Thomas Siburt. Front row: John Woolsey, Louis 
Wempe, Robert Williams, Elwyn Church, Darrell Phillips, John 
Hargas. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE SOPHOMORES— Back row: Shoria Wil- 
son, Don Torkelson, Frank Sutton, Charles Downing, Daniel Paradee, 
Andrew Vedros, Sidney Marlin, Arden Kemler. Third row: William 
Harris, Lester Barger, Charles Bickley, Manuel Bendersky, Jack Groff, 
Charles Parker, Andrew Wheeler, Harlan Ellis. Second row: William 



Snodgrass, Miles Agee, Sydney Byrd, William Thogmartin, Raymond 
Parker, Wayne Chapin, Bernard Mowery, William Gross. Front row: 
Frederick Skinner, Harold Peffly, Charles Hall, Calvin Gatz, Robert 
McCutcheon, Don Lee, Frank Stiles, Jr., Frank Murry, Richard Groff. 



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108 






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VETERINARY MEDICINE SOPHOMORES— Back row: Sid Galinko, 
James Neal, Joe Selby, Clifford Eby, Paul Schoonhoven, Howard 
Furumoto, Michael Roller, James Palotay, Dearrold Palmer. Third row: 
Joe Atkinson, James McKitterick, Jr., Ralph Bishop, John Gamby, 
Victor Miller, Robert Crispell, Alex Hogg, Arthur Carlson, Jr., Robert 



Schupbach, Charles Nace. Second row: Robert Boobar, Ralph Barrett, 
Dean Newton, James Gough, Ned Rokey, Richard Elliott, James Bar- 
clay, Herndon Honstead, Donald Mills. Front roiv: Harold Henderson, 
Wendell Kelley, John Wadsworth, Ben Brake, James Olin, Robert 
Weaver, Leonard Goodloe, William Kirkeminde, Melvin Dietrich, Jr. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE FRESHMAN— Back row: Keith King, 
Dan Russell, Philip DePuy, Oren Kelsey, Richard Boyd, Robert 
Dubin, Max Beam, Wallace Stephenson, Stanley Worl. Third row: 
Judd Chesnut,, Edmund Levin, Elvyn Liebl, James Jewell, John 
Hudelson, Richard Warren, Jordon Rexroat, Thomas Carleton. Second 



row: Harold Severson, Gerald Bunyan, Marion Rankin, Hubert Weeks, 
Raymond Brugger, Julius Berchem, Raymond Hill, J. W. Theobald. 
Front row: Clifton Douglass, Jr., Marvin Jared, Willis Burgin, Edward 
Moore, Keith Ludwig, Harvey Holmes, C. C. Hunter, R. A. Couk. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE FRESHMEN— Back row: Dale Oshel, 
John Manning, Jr., Lawrence Evans, John Hinton, Robert Phillips, 
Cloyd Lewis, George Bradbury, Jr. Third row: Darrell Kiger, John 
Hart, Paul Schafer, Gene Porter, Paul Spencer, Robert Hodgson, Vic- 
tor Lundstrom, Marion Szatalowicz. Second row: Busch Meredith, 



John Price, William Boley, Carl Lenz, Robert Walters, Orlen Pfeifer, 
William Beckenhauer, Robert McNabb. Front row: David Herrick, 
Charles Dudley, Robert Van Dyke, Donald Jackson, Louis Otto, Ray- 
mond Swart, Irwin Collinge, Robert Kjarsgaard, Tyson Long. 



109 




COL A. G. HUTCHINSON, (above) is the head of the Department of 
Military Science and commander of the ROTC detachment at the 
College. 

' I 'HE Reserve Officers Training Corps has two pur- 
poses. The first is to produce junior officers who 
have the qualities essential to their progressive and 
continued development as officers of the Army of the 
United States. The second is to lay foundations of in- 
telligent citizenship within the student and to give him 
such basic military training as will be of benefit to him 
and to the military service if he becomes a member of 
it. Each year more than 600 ROTC graduates from col- 
leges throughout the nation receive commissions in the 
Regular Army and Air Force. 



Serves Double Purpose 



In order to become enrolled in the ROTC basic 
course, one must be a citizen of the United States not 
more than 22 years of age nor less than 14; one must 
be physically fit under Departments of the Army and 
Air Regulations; one must be accepted by the institution 
as a regularly enrolled student of the institution and 
meet specific technical requirements for enrollment in 
certain branches. Upon completing the basic course, a 
student enters the advanced course voluntarily. He must 
sign a written agreement with the Government to com- 
plete the advanced course, contingent upon remaining 
in school, and to attend the advanced summer camp at 
the time specified. Only advanced students may attend 
summer camp. Those going to the camps receive free 
transportation to and from camp, plus $75 per month 
while attending. Their board and room is also paid. 
The purpose of summer camp is to furnish a concen- 
trated laboratory course in military science and tactics. 
Advanced ROTC infantry and artillery students at K- 
State will go to Fort Riley. The signal corps students 
will go to Fort Monmouth, N. J., and the air students 
will atend Lowery Field, Denver, Colo. Upon gradu- 
ation from the advanced ROTC course, if the student's 
work merits the distinction he may be designated a 
Distinguished Military Student and thereby become 
eligible to compete for Regular Army or Air Force 
Commissions. 



ROTC STAFF— Back row: M/Sgt. George W. Thompson, M/Sgt. 
James Bolton, T/Sgt. Ray Wilson, T/Sgt. Thomas Cox, S/Sgt. 
James Aufderheide, lst/Sgt. Laren W. Garher. Third row: S/Sgt. 
Edward Brown, T/Sgt. Stanley Sawicki, S/Sgt. Raymond Duval, 
lst/Sgt. Lloyd V. Hansen, lst/Sgt. Kenneth Holland. Second row: 
T/Sgt. Glenn Puresselley, Capt. Louis A. Copeland, Capt. Joseph 



K. Murphy, Major Sydney Cone, M/Sgt. John L. Lawrence, M/Sgt. 
Herbert W. Bradman. Front row: Capt. Alfred Gallep, Major 
Bernard Schmitt, Capt. Harvey E. Pearce, Capt. Frederick Bohan- 
non, Capt. Edward Cleary, Major Hartzell Richards, Lt. Col. Dean 
Eshelman. 




110 



Year Marked By Changes and Additions 



~\ /TILITARY instruction was first conducted at Kan- 
sas State College in 1868. Infantry and artillery 
units have been here for many years. In September 
1946, an Air Force Unit was added, followed in Sep- 
tember, 1947, by a Signal Corps Unit. The new post- 
war ROTC program has brought many changes in mili- 
tary instruction on the campus. Among these changes 
are the assignment of all basic students to a common 
course of instruction, revision and modernization of 
the advanced course, receipt of much new equipment, 
and a great increase in the number of graphic and 
visual instructional aids. Three moving picture projec- 
tors are furnished for the detachment by the Army. 
These are used often in the classroom for instructional 
film showings. Once every week a public movie is 



given in the Military Science building showing some of 
the more interesting and educational films of military 
science and tactics in operation. This year the War 
Department published the new Senior ROTC Manual, 
Volume 1, which was issued to basic students. Before 
the last war these manuals were not furnished by the 
government. 

The new drill field has been prepared and will 
greatly facilitate the instruction of drill formations and 
marching. Also basic students have been issued new 
dark green, officer-type uniforms this year. Last year, 
the advanced students were issued new uniforms, com- 
posed of a battle jacket and trousers, which they will 
be able to wear if called to active duty after becoming 
reserve officers. 



ROTC OFFICERS — Back row: Robert McFadden, Jessie Mayfield, 
James Shelley, Martin Massoth, Robert Woodson, Harold Shields, 
Phillip Stallard, Joieph Cadwell, Carl Pache, Harold Mitchell, Warren 



Seiffe. Front row: Dale Brees, Benton Starks, John Frazier, Joseph 
Molson, Harold Miller, Albert Hancock, Kenneth Hunt, Robert Yates, 
Robert Mock, John Gard. 



ROTC OFFICER — Back row: Jack Dunlap, Grover Nutt, Lawrence 
King, John Conley, Robert Lorson, Joe Zollinger, John Lewis, David 
Eckelman, Jean Hare, Richard Sizemore. Front row: John Meisner, 



Duane Patterson, Loren Pinnick, Kenneth Parish, Danny Shupp, Fred 
C. Kramer, Robert Cox, Franklin Adams, Richard Neil, Maynard 
Shumate. 





Ill 






ROTC COMPANY A — Back row: Donn Demaree, John Costello, 
Louis Ernsting, Donald Bowen, Dean Ayars. Sixth row: Robert Dor- 
gan, David Bartholomew, Harold Broadie, Joe Blanchard, Mihon 
Bozanic, Alan Britt, Willis Adams, Paul Adams, Fred Borck. Fifth 
row: Bernard Carlson, George Bronaugh, Keith Beeman, Richard But- 
ler, Melvin Bunge, Kenneth Cowan, Darrell Carr, Herbert Baker, Merle 
Chalmers. Fourth row: Edgar Bienhoff, Arthur Albers, Loren Dunn, 
William Allen, Warren Allen, Melvin Casey, Glen Carlson, Delbert 

ROTC COMPANY B— Back row: Mowry Gilbert, John Hall, Bryan 
Gates, Clark Danner, Max Feaster, Robert Fangman, John Fritschen, 
Lloyd Garbe, Glenn Hefty. Fifth row: Lloyd Fredrickson, Robert Hahn, 
David Houston, R. Duane Godwin, William Gardiner, Bernard Kas- 
tens, Charles Haines, Dale Handlin, Dan Cox, Richard Lee Davis. 
Fourth row: Jack Kahle, Robert Hering, Harry Hixon, A. Robert 
Gould, J. V. Harlon, Ronald Farrar, Monroe Hughbanks, John Gil- 
man, Clarence Jones, Jr., Laurel Goddard. Third row: Robert Greve, 

ROTC COMPANY C— Back row: Richard Harman, Richard Hanson, 
Howard Kendall, Willis Melgren, Robert McCaustland, Joseph Mor- 
gan, John Mothes. Sixth row: Herbert Matey, Dean Mumaw, John 
Mitchell, Glenn Keast, Loren Martin, Leland McCall, Ed Hedstorm, 
Paul Kutnik, Leonard Lutters. Fifth row: Harlan Kamm, Richard Miller, 
Stuart Hartman, Robert Mushbush, Alphia Knapp, Howard McCune, 
Donald Meenen, Kenneth Myer, John McKeen. Fourth row: Glenn 
Krug, Jack Morgan, Ronald Kilmartin, Bob Kittle, William Hansen, 



Berry, Kenneth Dageforde. Third row: Carl Dethloff, Wayne Alpers, 
Paul Bennett, William Baehr, Elden Anderson, Mark Baldwin, Charles 
Campbell, John Donmyer, James Douglas. Second row: Webb Clark, 
Don Atchison, Alvin Becker, William Brown, William Considine, 
Samuel Euler, Howard Akins, Albert Bodde, Harold Bartleson, John 
Barnes. Front row: Alan Cobb, William Allen, James Adams, H. 
Dean Adams, Roland Craig, Bowen Brady, Byron Edwards, Richard 
Carter, Don Benne, Robert Bayles. 

Oscar Johnson, Jr., Ira Johnston, Richard Hus, Delmar Hampl, Nor- 
man Hogue, Kenneth Jones, William Jones, Jack Hofmann, Herbert 
Hoskins. Second row: John Foote, Bradley Hooper, Darwin Guinn, 
Myron Edgerton, William Fleming, Philip Finlev, Earl Jameson, 
Norman Held, Lloyd Handlin, Roger Harts. Front row: Glen Dur- 
flinger, Glenn Garrison, Phil Freeman, Jack Graham, Homer Gurtler, 
Glen Gurtler, Gordon Johnson, Darrell Houk, Dillon Higgason, 
Willie Hilbert. 

Gene Lovett, James Norton, Howard Maddux, John McGill. Third row: 
Tom Mall, Bill McEachern, Wayne Lawrence, Richard Martin, Billy 
Langhofer, John Konecny, Harold Mertz, Guy Olson, Willard Kyrk, 
Francis Kitchen. Second row: Joel Morrison, Paulson Leighton, Frank 
Mosier, Max Morris, Dean Misegades, Herbert Myers, George Lasley, 
Dominic Monea, Michael Murphy. Front row: John Kreider, Robert 
Mordy, Terry McMinn, Charles Lewis, Donald Murphy, Harold Lloyd, 
Lowell New, Gordon Nelson, Drexyel Morris, Jack Lay. 



112 



ROTC COMPANY D— Back row: Don Quakenbush, Clarence Rempe, 
Ralph Parsons, Thomas Overton, Jack Renner, John Reese, Jack 
Pendleton, Armin Samuelson. Sixth row: Jack D. Savage, Kenneth 
Rhed, Donald E. Setter, George H. Robinson, Edward Seiwert, Elliott 
Stanton, Donald Ploger, Frederick Schwab, Raymond Prather. Fifth 
row: Alan Pittaway, Don Pepoon, Fred J. Pierce, Arthur W. Ross, 
Lloyd Poison, Bobby H. Roberts, Dale Rowley, Morey Oldweiler, 
Leonard Rockers. Fourth row: Forest Pierce, Fred Rogers, Loren Riley, 
Anthony Rockers, James Simms, Raymond Stanton, Dale Paulsen, 

ROTC COMPANY E— Back row: Richard Simmons, Max Van Doren, 
Walter Willis, Robert Wulfkuhle. Sixth row: Marvin Young, Clarence 
Suetter, Leland Wagner, Clayton Trapp, Harold Velasquez, Thomas 
S. Wilson, William Shipley, Eugene Young, Curtis Tarrant. Fifth row: 
Harold Sylvis, James Stevenson, Ervin Williams, Don Steuart, Kenneth 
Stohr, Bruce Trent, Kenneth Scott, Robert Strickler, John Wallick. 
Fourth row: Rudolph Wyatt, Harold VanCleave, Ray Romero, Leo 
Whitehait, Richard Tesche, John Clark Wilk, Phillip Wendland, John 
Thatcher, Frank Wylie, Lloyd Volkel. Third row: Dewaine Stapp, 

ROTC COMPANY F— Back row: George Abel, Alvah Dyer, Charles 
Gibson, Verlin Deutscher, Harold Eversmeyer, Duane Barney, Don 
Dozier. Fourth row: Fred Barrett, Richard Adamson, Bill Boner, 
George Atteridg, Stanley Christensen, Alvin Banman, Paul Cork, 
Russell Frey, Marion Clark. Third row: James Baker, Delbert Bosley, 
Keith Dombaugh, Robert Flower, Robert Adams, Byron Albers, 



Weldon Riley, John Owen, Eldon Shannon. Third row: Robert Ross, 
Richard Parker, Robert Orr, Dwight Reece, Bruce Selby, Harry B. 
Price, Gene Ott, Marshall Schirer, Trevor Rees, Donald J. Roberts. 
Second rows Arlyn Schell, Howard Sanford, Calvin Dor, Richard 
Ramsey, Jack Seal, Eugene Smith, Paul D. Nelson, Robert B. Smith, 
Benjamin Simmons, Thon Schartz. Front row: Marlon Peter, Ferdi- 
nand Perce, Duane Snyder, Jack Perine, Dale Roberds, Marcellus 
Schwartz, Dean Page, Ivan Risley, Kenneth Sherley, John Pearl. 

Ray Van Pelt, John Waugh, Don Strong, Lester Whearty, Don Theel, 
Richard Tilgner, Vance Stiles, Ivan Wixson, Charles Townsend. 
Second row: Bob C. Willard, Robert E. Sterling, Victor Tilley, Earl 
Wendland, Robert Warren, Ernest Waters, Norman Wilms, Norman 
Tornquist, Richard L. White, James Sumner. Front row: Dean Towner, 
Stanley C. Wood, John Zentner, Francis Van Wormer, Elmer Wohler, 
Charley Townsend, Dwight Zongker, Max Swartz, William Stevens, 
Ross Sackman. 



Dale Clements, Rex Clemens, Hugh Deardorff. Second row: Theodore 
Barrett, Loyd Boumfield, Allen Berte, Douglas Anderson, Louie Chris- 
man, Merrill Bumbaugh, Harold Gentry, Edward Carlson, Donald 
Allen, Donald Blinn. Front row: John Conner, Donald Crippen, 
Ronald Boles, Dayton Carlson, Dale Davies, William Crawford, Neil 
Erickson, Edwin Bush, Willard Cleveland, Don Brookover. 






113 



Unit Rated High By War Department 



The ROTC Unit at Kansas State was given an "ex- 
cellent" rating by the War Department Inspectors on 
its accomplishments during the 1946-47 school year. 
This is the highest rating given by the War Department. 

The building which now houses the ROTC detach- 
ment was completed a few years ago for the use of the 
military science department. It contains several offi- 
ces, numerous class rooms, a large garage where the 
detachment's motor vehicles and large artillery equip- 
ment are kept, a rifle room where 500 Ml rifles are 
placed in their individual racks, and a spacious rifle 



range in the basement. The unit has converted one of 
the class rooms into a library where the students may 
relax and read or study whenever they wish to do so. 

This year at Kansas State College there were 1,141 
students enrolled in the ROTC course. Of this number, 
970 were basic students and 171 were enrolled in the 
Advanced Course. Last year the combined total of 
basic and advanced students was only 523 indicating 
that there has been more than a 100 per cent increase 
over the enrollment of last year. Veterans get an auto- 
matic exemption in ROTC courses. 



ROTC COMPANY G—Back row: Robert Knoche, Robert Miller, 
Gerald Hires, Robert Kimmel, Robert Hinrichs, Rolland Kerr, Sam 
Howell. Fourth row: Leo Klameth, Robert Jansen, Marvin Kramer, 
Buster Lassen, Jack Matson, Frank Levell, Don Lockstrom, Robert 
Griffeth, John Janzen, Que Mueller. Third row: Gerald Johnson, John 
Goff, Richard McDonald, Darwin Holliday, Marvin Matti, John 



Hughs, Jack Hayward, Jesse McCready, Manuel Navarro, Donald 
McCracken. Second row: James Hill, Jr., George LaOrange, Earl 
Krause, Charles Newman, Robert McLeod, Robert Grandle, Donald 
Lancaster, Corliss Kiser, Bill Korb. Front row: Bruce Gilbert, Loren 
Goyer, Russell Lynn, Robert Jacques, George Lawrence, Dale Meyers, 
Llye Johnson, Alpha Howard, Roy Marrs, Ralph George. 



ROTC COMPANY H—Back row: Duane Wallace, John Ramm, 
Albert Remsberg, Wyatt Silker, Joseph Rempe, Orvin Tiemann, Ray- 
mond Sharp, Jimmy Sorenson, Loren Paull, Lawrence Price. Fourth 
row: John Schnittker, James Stanley, Donald Sloan, Marvin Smith, 
Eugene Rasmusson, Dean Newell, Stewart Wagner, LeRoy Yount, 
Charles Smith, Dean Van Valkenburgh.T^zW row: Arlie Roesner, 
Norman Rogers, Jack Vanier, Robert Ward, Gale Roush, Eldon 



Portschi, James Taylor, Emmett Richter, Everett Scovel, Ronald Tay- 
lor. Second row: George O'Neal, Bill Vondracek, Donald Vohs, Ross 
Palenske, Jr., Bernard Weelman, Floyd Potter, Frank Solomon, Jimmy 
Schuh, Robert Parizo, Ernest Peck. Front row: Thomas Willard, Lor- 
raine Rees, George Stauffer, Robert Olsen, Robert Smith, Gene Scott, 
John Wharton, Stewart Rankin, Donald Nickerson, Norbert Roths. 





114 






ROTC BATTERY A — Back row: Harold Dalrymple, Neville Dunnan, 
William Adams, Mark Doyen, James Drain, Karl Fechner, William 
Eklund, William Edwards, William Brownlee, William Bradley, Harry 
Cordes. Fifth row: Boyd Boyer, Bernard Chadd, Clifford Ericson, 
Wilber Cole, Robert Briscoe, Walter Gehlbach, James Bhear, Jack 
Glover, Milton Eisenhower, Jr., Willard Geiger, Charles Burgess 
Fourth row: Lloyd Barger, Daniel Becker, Maurice Bird, Bernard 
Clark, Willard Boldenow, Wayne Burklund, Robert Fobes, Thomas 
Beels, John Busenbark, Robert Dixon, Veryl Fagan. Third row: Fred- 

ROTC BATTERY B— Back row: Lloyd Luthi, Pleasant Little, Robert 
Hull, Vernon Kisner, Robert Lewis. Sixth row: Eugene Foltz, Harold 
Neh?r, Harold McFadden, Kerwin Kaaz, Harry Haas, Rodney Leonard, 
Kimber Heddens, John Hill, Gary Hoyer. Fifth row: Don Loyd, 
Richard Hooker, Richard Mead, John Huenefeld, George Langshaw, 
Martin Mahoney, Walter Metzinger, Cecil Kluge, Dean Mitchell, 
Thayne Jones. Fourth row: David Keith, Wayne Johnson, Duane 
Heikes, Jack Luthi, Wayne Harris, Robert Knoefel, Carl Keller, Dale 

ROTC BATTERY C— Back row: Donald Rogers, Milton Miller, Jr., 
Virgil Swerns. Sixth row: Donald Spring, Alvin West, Don Rice, 
Robert Stoltenberg, Ralph Skoog, John Rogers, Robert Speer, Ross 
Roepke, Walt Way, Edward Pence. Fifth row: Sykes Trieb, James 
Sherrod, Porter Sigler, Edward Rose, Mert Schwensen, Philip Wilson, 
Clifford Schumacker, James Wilson, Perry Wayman, Isaac Wycoff. 
Fourth row: Alton Wilson, Donald Thurlow, Roger Taylor, Keith 
St. Pierre, Dale Wilson, Curtis Shafer, Don Wilson, Jerry Rothweiler, 



rick Ernst, George Bistline, Philip Dade, Donald Bircher, William 
Bond, Loren Detwiler, Gene Beghaus, Daniel Denneler, Kenneth 
Alderman, Max Bird, Gene Ackerman. Second roiv: Quentin Carnahan, 
Bernard Anderson, Ralph Germann, Dale Frownfelter, Bruce Dunlap, 
Richard Chase, Andy Dimsdale, Ken Barnowski, Billy Collins, Robert 
Clark. Front row: Don Brown, Lee Desilet, Herman Bengtson, Philip 
Clark, Wilbert Fanshier, Donald Germann, Don Downing, Harold 
Brown, Don Button, Emery Eklund. 

McGinnis, Philip McCIure, Verne Leichciter. Third row: Larry Hoke, 
Harold Lukens, Donald Hopkins, Millard McAfee, Garth Grissom, 
Vernon Hesterman, Harley Keller, Al Manis, Zane McAnelly, Walter 
Hatch. Second roiv: Hazen Hess, Roland Nelson, Miles McKee, Bill 
Hayden, Wayne Long, Richard McGehee, Lester Goyen, Robert Ma- 
lone, John Moorman. Front row: Gerald Kale, Herbert Lungren, 
Lawrence McCarty, Norman Hug, Michael Myers, Don Matlack, 
Robert Mealey, Floyd Leonard, Paul Irvine, Marion Hammarlund. 

Robert Warne, Alan Moser. Third row: James Shields, Wayne Wey- 
rich, Bill Richards, Ralph Sjorgren, Jack Perkins, Ernest Schultz, 
James Tomlins, Jack Zoeller, Arlan Thompson, Mark Werbin. Second 
roiv: Jack Pohlman, Max Ortman, Jim Morgan, Paul Taylor, Adolph 
Niemeier, Richard Templeton, Lloyd Sidwell, Bill Tuttle, Don Spitze, 
Don Scott. Front row: LaVerne Sidfrid, Bob Stonebraker, T. Takustti, 
Jim Vycital, James Pretz, Herbert Watts, William Simecka, Robert 
Shepler, Dean Smith, William Pierson. 



115 



ROTC COMPANY D— Back roiv: Bob Finley, Jack Finley, Richard 
Dickerson, Joseph Dwerlkotte, Don Buster, Ernie Barrett, Lawrence 
Andra, Roger Clogher. Fifth row: Kenneth Fatzer, Darrel Canfield, 
Patrick Casey, Dale Crist, John Fleener, Erling Andersen, Harry Can- 
nici, George Daily, John Browne, Owen Fennema, James Gaskell. 
Fourth row: John Flanders, Wiliam Barrett, John Eggerman, George 
Armantrout, Dale Dannels, Dean Campbell, Ramon Dunn, Delbert 
Gantz, James Fox, Charles Coffin, Teddy Bayer. Third row: Ward 

ROTC BATTERY E — Back roiv: Lauren Johnson, Kenneth Hartung, 
Lauren Roe, Willis Knopp, Walter McKee, William Hull, Jr., Calvin 
Johnson, Ralph Hunt. Sixth row: Roger Lawson, Charles Nixon, 
Walter Gault, Clyde Headrick, Wesley Moore, Charles Kaup, Robert 
Reu, James Guthrie, John Oswald, Edward Head. Fifth row: William 
Rayne, Norman Mortimer, Kenneth Harkness, Willis Mack, Richard 
Holder, Jay Honeywell, Ernest Ptacek, Jack Logan, Ira Rogers, Fred 
Kettle. Fourth row: Robert Hein, Richard Morse, Robert Gutzman, 
Charles Reese, George Pratt, Richard Knowlton, John Rauch, Clinton 

ROTC BATTERY F— Back row: Floyd Tiffany, James Ruhaak, Harold 
Wiley. Seventh row: Gene Welch, Herbert Timm, William Williams, 
Jerry Woods, James Schoof, Edward Speer, Charles Volkel, Robert 
Snyder, Gilbert Wilkerson. Sixth row: Don Ward, Miles Williams, 
Wililam Schilling, Robert Thompson, Leland Turner, Dan Upson, 
Paul Swan, Jerry Vanier, Elmer Stueder. Fifth row: John Walklet, 
Don Smejkal, Tom Salyer, Jim Warner, Trevor Watson, Bob Williams, 
Paul Ruggels, Galen Watts, Lloyd Venburg. Fourth row: Lewis 
Schneider, Rex Shaffer, Ronald Stepanek, Robert Watson, Walter 



Dodge, Malcolm Coldwell, Willis Chambers, William Barton, Clark 
Karl, Leo Coleman, John Fincannon, Fred Clayton, Phil Brewster, 
Donald Bernbeck. Second row: James Dragoo, Keith Goodrich, How- 
ard Backman, Edwin Carleton, Dale Apel, Louis DeBord, William Aye, 
Joseph Conley, William Errebo, Ralph Field. Front row: James Cap- 
linger, Edward Eaton, Karl Faidley, Sherman Callot, Donald Bender, 
Vernon Fitch, Lawrence Bullinger, Dwain Barcellina, Jim Esslinger, 
Gaylord Freed, Lowell Byarlay. 

Hughes, Wiliam Harnedburger, Durreth Robbins. Third row: Frank 
Overley, Robert John, Merrill Ray, Earl Philips, Bernard Keating, 
Robert Kirgis, David Kays, Stanley McMillan, Don Lambright, Lee 
Haney. Second row: Robert McCormack, Billy Hilt, Dean Nunn, John 
Law, David Hendricks, Wallace Harris, Ronald Linscheid, James 
Pechin, Gerald Lawrence, Earl Johnson. Front row: Edwin Jones, 
Lawrence McFadden, Stanley Pearson, Harris Miller, Charles Neal, 
Hiram King, Bruce Karns, Duane Gehrke, Robert Heskett, John 
Holden. 

Saathoff, Dale Weidman, Victor Zimmerman, Rex Stone, Gerald Reiss. 
Third row: John Turner, Herbert Schoonover, Phillip Wiltfong, James 
Shannon, Frank Westerman, Jr., Duane Steeples, Dale Schwindaman, 
Kenneth Zimbelman, Terry Webster, Ernest Shull. Second row: Virgil 
White, Raymond Strobridge, Donald White, Lawrence Schafer, Donald 
Uppendahl, William Sewell, Leland Schwarz, Frank Ruggels, Her- 
schel Tognascioli, Fred Warren. Front row: David Ward, Ronald 
Stinson, Harold Ross, Robert Shaffer, Leonard Sence, Melving Winger, 
Edward Zahn, Adrian Scribante, Clarence Swallow. 






116 




ROTC ADVANCED CADETS— 
Back row: Philip Baker, Donald 
Rader, William Estill. Front row: 
Robert Adams, Jr., Earl Burdick, 
Stanley Lindgren, Charles Wyble. 



ROTC Sponsors Varied Organizations 



'""["'HERE are many interesting and educational organi- 
zations sponsored by the ROTC detachment at 
K-State. Scabbard and Blade is an honorary military 
organization open to those students who have proved 
themselves outstanding in the advanced course. Persh- 
ing Rifles is the organization composed of basic stu- 
dents who do special drill formations. This is the first 
years this group has been active on this campus. The 
members of this organization wear distinctive uniforms. 

The Cadet Officer's Club is comprised of advanced 
course students. Each year they sponsor the Military 
Ball, one of the principal social functions of the college. 
An Honorary Cadet Colonel and two Honorary Cadet 
Majors, one for each batallion, are chosen by the 



Officer's Club from a group of candidates submitted 
by organized houses and independent groups. Each 
company also chooses its Honorary Company Com- 
mander from the group of candidates. Last year the 
coeds honored by the ROTC passed under an arch of 
sabers to the front of the band stand where Colonel 
Hutchinson made the presentations. Music was fur- 
nished by Hal Mclntyre, and Del Courtney was engaged 
for this year's Military Ball held April 9 in the gym. 
All military sudents who are interested may try out 
for the ROTC rifle team. The best marksmen are 
chosen for the team to represent K-State. They shoot 
matches with ROTC rifle teams all over the United 
States. This year they have fired more than 80 matches, 
winning a very large per cent of those fired. 



ROTC ADVANCED CADETS— Back row: Richard Long, Jerry D. 
Brooks, Charles Crooks, Robert Palmer, Oswald Kilroy. Fifth row: 
Morris Werner, Joseph Holmes, Joe Newberry, George Blume, William 
Houghton, Forest Campbell, Dick Jepsen, Duane Nelson, Lester 
Shriver, Glen Scanlan. Fourth row: Jack Moll, Elmer Fatzer, Robert 
Kuhn, Max Sutton, Charles J. Thornton, Richard Hemphill, Russel 
Bard, Joseph Byers, Harold Bellairs, LeRoy Vinyard. Third row: 
Donald Flentie, Richard Clowers, Dayton Kern, Maurice Thorne, 



Ronald Peterson, Lowell Boughton, Eugene Kern, Loys Guest, Robert 
Swan, Jr., Nobel Peterson. Second row: Jack Greeawalt, Harold 
Fielding, John Bushnell, Jr., Robert Lehnen, Gordon Herr, William 
Froelich, James M. Brown, LeRoy Reynolds, Leslie Parrish, Dick 
Winger. Front row: Jonnie Burroughs, Robert Pettit, Carmen Wil- 
cox, Julius Schrader, James Hibbard, William Shafer, Glenn Utt, 
Robert Campbell, William R. Ramsey, Robert Crackel. 




117 




ROTC ADVANCED CADETS— Back row: Dean Haddock, James 
Mussett, Dayton Molzen, Charles McCarthy, Phil True, Wayne Douce, 
Joseph Clark. Third row: Stephen Sage, Marvin Welsh, Leslie Baxter, 
Robert Brooks, Robert Allingham, Warren Lovendahl. Second row: 



David Dixon, John R. Roberts, Jr., Howard Frost, Paul La Croix, 
Donald W. Scott. Front row: W. R. Hale, J. W. Hollenbeck, H. D. 
Heise, J. M. Funk, R. R. Wilson, J. W. Kilian. 



ROTC Staff Large to Meet Need 



The following men are members of this year's 
ROTC staff: Colonel A. G. Hutchinson head; Lt. Col. 
Dean H. Eshelman Assistant for the Air Force; Major 
Sidney L. Cone Adjutant; Major H. E. Richards, Supply 
Officer; Captain Joe K. Murphy; Captain Edward 
Cleary; Captain Frederick G. Bohannon; Captain Man- 
uel M. Price; Captain William J. Lynn; Captain Lewis 
A. Copeland; Captain Harvey A. Pearson; Captain Al- 
fred F. Gallup. 

Noncommissioned officers who served as assistant 
instructors include the following: M/Sgt. James J. 
Bolton; M/Sgt. Herbert W. Brodman; M/Sgt. John 
L. Lawrence; M/Sgt. George W. Thompson; lst/Sgt. 



Loren W. Garber; lst/Sgt. Kenneth W. Holland 
lst/Sgt. Lloyd B. Hansen; T/Sgt. Thomas C. Cox 
T/Sgt. Stanley F. Sawicki; T/Sgt. Roy E. Wilson 
T/Sgt. Glenn F. Pursselley; S/Sgt. James Aufderheide 
S/Sgt. Edward J. Brown; S/Sgt. Raymond C. Duval 

The War Department Ruling allowing former ser- 
vice men to enroll in the advanced ROTC course makes 
it possible for veterans of the second World War to 
continue their military training while attending college. 

Many Kansas State graduates are now in the Regu- 
lar Army or the Reserve Corps, particularly in the 
Infantry, Artillery, and Veterinary Corps. Commissions 
are awarded annually to selected graduates. 



ROTC ADVANCED CADETS— Back row: Charles E. Walker, Gail 
Farrell, Vernon Acker, Bob Rudbeck, Joe Reebe, Peter Kohlrus. Third 
row: Wiliam Johnston, Lyle Schmidt, Ray Beaver, Wayne Engelhardt, 
Frank McBride, Edgar Engelken. Second row: Donald Paustian, Edwin 



Dronly, Elmer Quint, Harvey Malott, Carrington Malott, Arch Briggs. 
Front row: Homer F. Baker, Jr., Robert Brewer, Chester Walker, Jr., 
Kersey Reed, Robert Branan, Lewis Fairbanks, Hayes Beck. 




118 




IN GLEAMING white helmets, (left) 
the ROTC band leads the Home- 
coming parade, honoring Gen. Dwight 
D. Eisenhower. Cadets spent long 
hours drilling on the slope south of 
the Engineering building (right). Here 
they are being reviewed by officers. 




Plan ROTC Amateur Radio Station 



A NY student may become a member of the ROTC 
Radio Club which has been activated this year. 
This organization operates in connection with the Kan- 
sas State College Radio Club, and the two groups hold 
joint meetings twice a month. These students are 
trained to send and receive code, operate radios on both 
code and voice, and may become licensed amateur radio 
operators upon satisfactorily completing their course of 
study. Plans are being formed to set up an amateur 
radio station near the Military Science building. 

Each year the military science department participates 
in the Engineers' Open House celebration. A great deal 
of work and thought is put into the ROTC sponsored 
exhibits and demonstrations of up-to-date weapons and 



methods of warfare. 

Band Re-formed 

The ROTC band was re-formed this year under the 
direction of Captain Lewis A. Copeland. There are 38 
members in this group which plays for official Army 
and Air Force functions. 

Leading the Homecoming Parade, October 25, before 
General Dwight D. Eisenhower, was the Cadet Regi- 
ment headed by its all-ROTC band. This was the first 
time that any Army Chief of Staff had ever honored 
K-State with his presence. Another precedent was set 
on this occasion for it was the first time that General 
Eisenhower had ever reviewed an ROTC unit. 



ROTC BAND— Back row: Charles Scherer, Kenneth Kirkendall, 
William Hundley, Curtis Summers, Leon Beck, Jack Dunn, Jack 
Duffy, Terry Walter, Albert Wesley, Clinton Davies, Daniel Gardner. 
Fourth row: Capt. Lewis Copeland, Dale Allen, John Murphy, Melvin 
Aufdemberge, Eugene Steele, Arthur Schumann, James McLeland, 
Max Tetlow, Dale Harris, James Thielen, S/Sgt. Gene Butterfield, 
Third row: Morris Hostetter, Burt Porterfield, Anthony D'elia, Nor- 



man Collins, Carl Cooley, Pete Hampton, William Berner, Lyndell 
Fitzgerald, Donald Fitzgerald, Albert Morgan. Second row: Winfield 
Pearson, Larry Wensel, Norburt Pierson, Robert Paris, Chester Walker, 
Harvey Arand, Alfred Gigstad, Earl Elliott, Loran Scott, Duane Stutz. 
Front row: Henry Kuhlman, Leland Bell, Curtis Gray, Lewis Stratton, 
Ted Bryant. 




119 




OFFICERS OF THE VETERANS' Cooperative Exchange, a branch of 
the Associated Veterans of World War II are from left to right Dick 
Eaton; George Lyons; Tom Avery, faculty sponsor; Wallace Moyle; 
Oakley Schrimshaw; Earl Coder, president. 



' I 'HE Associated Veterans of World War II was 
established at K-State in 1945. All those who 
served as members of the armed forces in World War 
II and were discharged other than "Without Honor" 
are eligible to affiliate with this organization. The 
group has 97 members. 

It is the purpose of the Associated Veterans to be of 
service to the school and to all veterans. This year the 
activities of the club were directed by David Gorrell, 
president; Joe Mofett, vice-president. Dr. Maurice 
Woolf, also head of the Counseling Bureau, served 
as the faculty sponsor. 

It was the Associated Veterans who established, pro- 
moted, and now supervise the Veterans Co-op which 
is located across from the northwest corner of the 



Vets Are Organized 

campus. It is a store selling groceries and other neces- 
sities on a cooperative basis and paying premiums to 
members. 

The Blue Cross campaign for the benefit of all 
married students on the campus was another project 
of this organization. The Blue Cross can provide hospi- 
talization and doctors fees for any member of the 
family who may become ill. This is done at a very low 
rate. 

The Veterans Administration Guidance Center is 
associated independently of Kansas State College and 
is under the direction and jurisdiction of the Federal 
Government. L. W. Henning, Chief of the Veterans 
Center, has been head of this district since 1945. 

It is the purpose of the Veterans Guidance Center to 
work with all veterans of the 13 counties in the north 
central Kansas district. Advice concerning vocational 
and educational planning and the selection of occupa- 
tional work for all veterans in need of this assistance is 
given in the Center. 

Those connected with the staff are: Lowell W. Hen- 
ning, Chief and Vocational Advisor; Jerry B. Varner, 
Training Specialist; Vergil Mcintosh, Training Special- 
ist; William Burkholder, Contact Representative; and 
Glen Wycoff, Training Facilities Officer. 




MEMBER OF THE VETER- 
ANS' Administration Guid- 
ance Center are back row: 
Glenn Wycoff, Jerry Varner, 
Vergil Mcintosh , William 
Burkholder. Front row: Fran- 
ces Moritz, Lowell W. Hen- 
ning, Jacquelyn Darland. 



120 





Honorary Cadet Colonel for the spring of 1947 was Irva Carver, being 
presented above to Colonel A. G. Hutchinson, head of the Department 
of Military Science. 



Spring Brings Queens 



Queen of Pep, reigning over Hobo Day last spring, was Barbara Baker, 
shown at the dance, (center) at the end of the day's campus clean-up 
and festivities. 



Men pitch in and work to clear the fences away for the new paved 
tennis courts on Hobo Day. The girls did their part by providing food 
and drink and a short break for the laborers. 



121 



Wis 




PROBABLY more than 100,000 boys and girls, men and women, have hurried along my corridors, 
and of them, less than 10 per cent have been "honor" or outstanding students. Being a pretty 
old Hill, I take pride in being able to pick these students from the time they first set foot on me 
as freshmen. Once in a while I make an awful mistake. 

Honorary societies were the first organizations to appear, not only on me, but on Hills even older 
than I. They have carried through nearly a century, providing loving cups and recognition for the 
young folks who show promise of becoming leaders in what commencement speakers think is the "out- 
side world." To me, this is a nether world, from which my inhabitants seldom return. Yet I want 
them to go, especially those who gained honors here, because they are the ones who show the most 
promise of fulfilling my destiny in the "outside world." 

Keys dangling from watch chains, necklaces and bracelets all signify that the wearer is a member 
of one of the higher orders — an honorary. 

These organizations are spread through all of my five schools, from West Ag, over my crest to 
the gym. Most of them are professional and vocational groups, only four represent the whole Col- 
lege. All-school honoraries, some new, some old, some local, some national are Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar 
Blue Key and Prix. 

Nearly all of the employees who step on me, that is to say, faculty, belong to more than one of 
the honorary societies. These are represented by the string of Greek letters which need not bother you 
following their names. In coming to me, they brought with them the tradition of honoring outstand- 
ing students, both in activities and scholarship, and created similar groups among my faculty and stu- 

123 



dent body. Many great men are listed among the ranks of these organizations, some of them tramp- 
ing on me every day, others passing over me at one time or another. 

Entrance into honoraries is gained by hard work in my other organizations, which are not too dif- 
ficult to obtain membership in, by high grades, and by a constant and persistent effort on the part of 
students to make me a real Hill among Hills. 

The professional groups further the work in their fields, perform services for their schools and 
departments, oftentimes sponsor huge events such as St. Pat's Prom, the Homecoming Ball, and recog- 
nition dinners and smokers. They enlist the aid of other clubs in the departments for help in their 
projects and bring about finer relations between students and faculty. 

All-school honoraries, although mainly for the purpose of recognition, conduct surveys, help in 
fund-raising campaigns and perform small but necessary duties for what they consider to be my gen- 
eral welfare. These groups are always trying to do nice things for me. If they make a little money on 
the side, I don't care. Usually they don't. 

Proud parents have often told me that they know their sons or daughters must have learned 
something from College because they were "honored" by an organization. 

Also, the sons and daughters may get a certificate which proves that they have been recognized 
for an achievement of great and ponderous worth. This can be handily tacked in a bedroom, buried 
in a pile of textbooks, or if the prossessor is vain, framed in gold and hung over the family piano with 
the picture of great-grandpa at the Battle of Shiloh. 

Anyway, I never see the certificates — what I see are the students. And I can tell you this — most 
of them deserve the recognition — they've given time and energy to me. This is my chance to give 
something back to them. 




124 




ZnXfUueesiA, CUaade 



Crowning the Engineers' Open House was the annual 
St. Pat's prom. This year, Kansas State Engineers 
chose Martha Miller, Alpha Chi Omega, as St. Patricia 
and Dick Fedell, mechanical engineer, was chosen as 
St. Patrick. Skipper Hawkins and his Varsity Crew 
furnished the music for balloon-laden Nicholas Gym. 
Intermission found the chemical engineers holding 
the winning trophy for the outstanding display of 
open house. 1948 marked the twenty-fourth annual 
Engineers' Open House. 



125 




Honoraries often perform some necessary function 
for the school, as well as being groups of recognition. 
Above, Pi Delta Kappa, honorary speech and dramat- 
ics fraternity members discuss a new problem with 
faculty sponsor, Prof. Earl Hoover. 



Sigma Delta Chi, in addition to its journalistic ac- 
tivities got a wire service for the Texas Mines 
versus K-State football game and brought hot notices 
to students at a sport varsity (top right). 



<Jfa*t&M2/ued, Setae, 



Mortar Board members hold one of their weekly 
meetings in Calvin Lounge (center). A banquet was 
the big social affair given by the Blue Key fraternity 
for its members (bottom). 




126 




BLUE KEY — Top row: John Aiken, Howard Borchardt, Mario 
Dirks, Wilbur Engelland, Don Ford, Richard Medlin, Loyd Petersen, 



Bottom row: William Richards, Ernest Sellers, John Shupe, Richard 
Sizemore, David Weatherby, Leonard Wood. 



Projects Occupy All-School Honoraries 



' I 'HIRTEEN Kansas State men were honored this 
year by being chosen for membership into Blue 
Key, national honor fraternity for outstanding senior 
men. 

Sponsoring the Homecoming Ball is the main pro- 
ject of Blue Key members each year. Because of the 
increased number of students, this year's dance was 
held at both the gym and the Avalon. 

Leading the group this year was John Aiken, presi- 
dent. President Milton S. Eisenhower is their faculty 
sponsor. 



Eight prominent senior women make up the member- 
ship of Mortar Board. luniors are chosen in the spring 
on a basis of scholarship and outstanding leadership 
in campus activities. 

In the fall, Mortar Board members conducted a 
campus opinion poll, aiding the administration. They 
held their annual scholarship dinner in March. 

Nancy Diggle and Elizabeth Ann Drake were presi- 
dents of the group, first and second semester respec- 
tively. 




MORTAR BOARD — Top 
row: Charlotte Dorf, Nancy 
Diggle, Elizabeth Ann Drake. 
Phyllis Evans, Georganne 
Fowler. Bottom row: Virginia 
Grandfield, Carol Jean Heter, 
Ann Huddleston, Marjorie 
Schowengerdt. 



127 




A TEA HONORS those graduate and undergraduate students selected 
for the scholastic honorary, Phi Kappa Phi in the fall semester. This 
year it was held in Calvin Lounge following initiation. 



Phi Kappa Phi 



T)HI KAPPA PHI, national scholastic honorary fra- 
ternity for technical schools, bestowed honors on 46 
Kansas State students the fall semester this year. Mem- 
bers are selected on a basis of high scholarship and 
character, and candidates are elected in both semesters. 

To emphasize scholarship in the thought of college 
students and to stimulate mental achievement by the 
prize of membership are the primary aims of Phi Kappa 
Phi. Membership is open to students of other honor 
societies and fraternities and to both men and women. 

Phi Kappa Phi was established at this College in 
1919. Dr. Mary T. Harman is president of the society. 



MEMBERS SELECTED BY PHI KAPPA PHI IN THE FALL SEMESTER 



School of Arts and Sciences 



Joan Aldous 
William F. Anderson 
Phyllis Barr 
Nancy J. Diggle 



Charlotte Dorf 
Louis E. Gishwiller 
Betty R. Jackson 
Mabel A. Kaump 



Patricia G. McCrary 
Bernice Neely 
Elaine Olmstead 
Milton Puziss 



Harriett F. Taylor 
Charles A. Van Derber, Jr. 
Patricia Collister Warburton 
Delores Wright 



School of Home Economics 



Eula M. Campbell 



Lillian F. Shapiro 



Graduate School 



Benjamin S. Baldwin 
Vincent B. Coombs 



Honor C. Pledger 
Donald B. Roark 



School of Agriculture 



Walter Bieberly 
Brinton Mario Dirks 



Charles D. Nesbit 
Edward D. Riffel 



School of Engineering and Architecture 



John T. Baker 
Dewey T. Bondurant 
Wilbert Buxton 
Robert A. Clark 
Earl W. Couchman 



Kenneth Fultz 
James Hadley 
Jackson Hedgecock 
Frederick Johnston 
Elmer D. Jones 



Fred Kays 
Louis J. McGovern 
Richard P. Medlin 
Loyd E. Peterson 
Harold W. Pierpont 



John H. Schruben 
Frank Schweiger 
John D. Skelton 
Charles J. Slawson 
Gerald M. Smith 



128 















WHO WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES— 
Top row. John Aiken, LeRoy Allman, Nancy Diggle, Charlotte Dorf, 
Don Ford, Charles Engelland, Virginia Grandfield, Mildred Hall, 
Ward Keller. Second row. David Mackintosh, Loyd Peterson, Mar- 



garet Pixley, Bill Richards, Dean Schowengerdt, Marjorie Schowen- 
gerdt, Ernest Sellers, Gabe Sellers, Jr., John Shupe. Bottom row. 
Richard Sizemore, Loreta Stricklin, Dick Warren, David Weatherby, 
Mae Weaver, James Wood, Leonard Wood. 



Students and Faculty Nationally Honored 



'""pWENTY-FIVE Kansas State students were hon- 
ored this year by being included in Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. 
This honor is national in its recognition of prominent 
students in every American university and college. 

Selection of Who's Who members is based on schol- 
arship and participation in extracurricular activities, 
with those honored chosen from the more outstanding 
students in each school. 

Each year, Who's Who is published in book form. 
Its objective is to place the names of outstanding 
American students before the people of the business 
world, and before others who annually recruit graduat- 
ing college and university talent. 

In another, and perhaps more widely known book — 

The Who's Who in America honors this year went 
to: J. E. Ackert, dean emeritus of the Graduate School; 
R. W. Babcock, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences; 
H. L. Baker, head of the education department; Prof. 
Emeritus R. J. Barnett; Prof. L. D. Bushnell; L. E. Call, 
dean emeritus of agriculture. 



Prof. A. L. Clapp; L. E. Conrad, head of the civil 
engineering department; H. W. Davis, head of the 
English department; Prof. Emeritus G. A. Dean; R. R. 
Dykstra, dean of veterinary medicine. 

President Milton S. Eisenhower; Francis D. Farrell, 
President Emeritus; P. L. Gainey, head of the bacteri- 
ology department; Prof. E. L. Holton; Prof. H. P. Hos- 
tetter; Harold Howe, dean of the Graduate School; 
Prof. H. L. Ibsen; M. M. Justin, dean of home eco- 
nomics; H. H. King, head of the chemistry department. 

L. E. Melchers, head of the botany department; Prof. 
Emeritus R. K. Nabours;S. A. Nock, director of admis- 
sion; W. F. Pickett, head of the horticulture depart- 
ment; C. H. Scholer, head of the applied mechanics 
department. 

R. A. Seaton, dean of engineering; R. C. Smith, head 
of the entomology department; R. I. Throckmorton, 
dean of agriculture; H. J. Umberger, dean emeritus of 
extension; Paul Weigel, head of the architecture depart- 
ment; Mrs. B. B. West, head of the institutional man- 
agement department; and J. T. Willard, College his- 
torian. 



129 




PRIX — Back row: Barbara 
Baker, Jerry Gatz, Patsy Da- 
vis. Second row: Abby Mar- 
latt, Carolyn Voran, Carolyn 
Anderson, Mary Ann Burgwin. 
Front row: Mae Weaver, Vir- 
ginia Gingrich, Mickey Pro 
ther, Shirley Pence. 



Groups Aim for Scholarship, Service 



YVTTTH a membership of 10, Prix, the honorary 
organization for outstanding junior women, car- 
ried out another successful year of activities. Each 
year, members of Prix are chosen from the group of 
sophomore women who have achieved a high scholastic 
average, with special attention to their prominence in 
campus activities. 

Prix girls, in their traditional black skirts, white 
sweaters, and red gavels, acted as monitors for the fresh- 
man orientation program in the fall. They helped with 
the aptitude tests, conducted tours of the campus, and 
in general, made the freshmen feel more welcome at 
Kansas State. Another project of Prix was a Silver 
Survey, conducted among the senior class women. The 
project was carried out under the leadership of Prix 
president, Patsy Davis. 



Women chosen for Phi Alpha Mu, scholastic honor- 
ary, must have maintained an average of B or above 
in all their college work, and must rank in the upper 
15 percent of their class. Thirty-one junior and senior 
women in the school of Arts and Sciences made up 
the membership of Phi Alpha Mu this year. 

Each spring members of Phi Alpha Mu giwe their 
annual scholarship tea, honoring sophomore women 
for outstanding grade records. At this time, the Mar- 
garet Russell Scholarship Award of $25 is presented to 
the member with the highest average. 

Phi Alpha Mu was organized at Kansas State in 
1921, and since that time has worked to maintain its 
motto of promoting scholarship, good fellowship and 
interest in college activities. Heading the group this 
year was Phyllis Evans. 



PHI ALPHA MU — Back row: Hope Leigh ton, June Duphorne, Mar- 
garet Seaton, Patricia McCrary, Shirley Deck, Wanda Knight, Doro- 
thy Gifford, Dorothy McGeorge, Delores Wright. Second row: Phyllis 
Barr, Eva Ward, Mary Ann Burgwin, Ruthetta Maxwell, Jo Harriett 



Hofsess, Marjorie Roepke, Helen Wilkie, Beverly Hayes. Front row: 
Arlene Ableson, Phyllis Evans, Nancy Diggle, Charlotte M. Dorf, 
Donna Kahl, Marilyn Moore, Virginia L. Epp, Jo Ann Jeffries, JoEllen 
McNicholas. 




130 




SIGMA TAU — Back row: Roy Baysinger, William Ketterman, Harvey 
Spencer, L. V. White, Jack Harmon, Irvine Gandee, Paul Giovagnoli. 
Third row: Norman Woolgar, Jack Hoefer, Clyde Hinman, Dale 
Olson, James Hadley, Leonard Luehring, Harold Pierpont, Robert 
Heline. Second row: Dick Fedell, Ward Haylett, Lynn Alford, Har- 



/ i 



mond Bear, Richard Swanson, Richard Sizemore, Dale Dronberger, 
Earl Couchman. Front row: Richard Medlin, Irvin Barnett, Louis 
Rotar, Ward Keller, John Shupe, Loyd Peterson, Leonard Wood, Joe 
Hodgson. 



Select Outstanding Engineers 



TJ 1 PSILON chapter of Sigma Tau, National honorary 
fraternity for all branches of engineering, carried 
out another succesful year of activity. 

Forty-six pledges, the largest pledge class ever to be 
elected into Epsilon chapter, faithfully performed all 
required pledge duties and were initiated during the 
first semester. These men were chosen from the upper 
one-third of the junior and senior classes. The selection 
is based on scholarship, practicality and sociability. 

Sigma Tau honors three sophomore engineers with 
the highest scholastic averages for their freshman year. 
These awards of gold, silver and bronze medals to the 
first, second and third ranking students respectively, 
are presented at the annual spring banquet. The ban- 
quet is given for Sigma Tau alumni and for the spring 
pledge class by the active chapter. Loyd Peterson pre- 

STEEL RING — Back row: Jack Rieb, Dale Dronberger, Michael Zelez- 
nak, David Nichols, William Ketterman, Ernest Sellers. Second row: 
Fred Cossman, Dr. Reed Morse, L. M. Jorgenson, Richard Medlin, 



sided over the group this year. 

"Keep the Steel Ring from Rust" is the motto of 
Steel Ring, honorary organization for junior and senior 
men representing all engineering departments. 

Being original instigators of the annual Engineers' 
Open House, members of Steel Ring found themselves 
busy making plans for this occasion. Steel Ring selects 
the judges for Open House, and presents the trophy to 
the engineering department having the most out- 
standing exhibit. A tradition with the organization, is 
the publication of the Intake and Exhaust, a magazine 
dedicated to the faculty and students of Kansas State 
College. 

This year, Steel Ring had a membership of 47. Dick 
Gorman acted as president. These men are chosen on 
the basis of leadership, personality and scholarship. 

Richard Finegan, Richard Sizemore, Winston Schmidt. Front row: Ray- 
mond Schneider, Louis Foltz, Dewey Bondurant, Loyd Peterson, Frank- 
lin Fenton, Paul Jorgenson. 




131 



f*y ^' f\ 



Q Q Q 



V\ 






PI TAU SIGMA — Back row: Henry Babcock, Bruce Madden, Wilbert 
Buxton, Frank Hamlin, John Postlethwaite, Guy Shelley, Jack Harmon, 
George Douglass, Richard Brooks, Frank Richards. Second row: 
Norman Woolgar, Danny Shupp, Charles Goss, Frank Schweiger, 

ETA KAPPA NU — Back row: Gabe Sellers, James Allensworth, Al- 
fred Getty, Irvine Gandee, Glenn Utt, Leon Wick, Kenneth Adrian, 
Cecil McComb, Charles Slawson, Robert E. Harrison. Third row: 
Ernest Selers, Robert R. Wilson, Tracy Nininger, Edwin Warren, 
Robert Lehnen, Kenneth Fultz, Wayne Thomas, Robert Uhl, Jesse 
Skelton, John Cooper, Robert Heline. Second row: David Leslie, 



Jean Burton, Tom Billiard, Jack Rieb, Boyd Brainard, Walter Crum, 
Harold Pierpont, Lloyd Gafford. Front row: Lynn Alford, Dick Fedell, 
Scott Graham, John Shupe, Joe Zollinger, John Anderson, Ward 
Keller, John Lewis, Dick Stockman, Harold McCauley. 

Oliver Steele, John Baker, Sidney Hamilton, Harmond Bear, James 
Hadley, Wayne Mohr, Clarence Rolls, Jack Hoefer, J. H. Brown. Front 
row: Russell Kerchner, Alfred Baden, Ralph Osborn, Otis Gilliland, 
Alvin Chrisman, Howard Bishop, Howard Depew, Richard Steele, 
Arthur Cotts, Roy Baysinger. 



Professional Honoraries Active 



T)I TAU SIGMA members took an active part in the 
mechanical engineers' display at the annual Engi- 
neers' Open House. One of their most popular exhibits 
was a beer bottle organ constructed with steam nozzles 
blowing over beer bottle resonating chambers filled 
with water to different levels. Each semester, Pi Tau 
Sigma edits the Indicator Card, a publication about the 
activities of the mechanical engineering department and 
of Pi Tau Sigma. 

An honorary organization for mechanical engineers, 
it has a membership totaling 60 this year. Members 
are selected on a basis of engineering ability, scholar- 
ship and personality. 

John W. Shupe, president, led the group. 



Forty actives made up the membership of Eta Kappa 
Nu, honorary organization for electrical engineers. 
These men, judged on a basis of scholarship and marked 
interest in the profession, are chosen from the upper 
one-fourth of the junior class and the upper one -third 
of the senior class in electrical engineering. 

The chapter sponsored a float in the Homecoming 
parade and built an exhibit for the annual Engineers' 
Open House. As a service to the school, the organization 
pledged itself to install additional wiring and fixtures 
for the temporary Student Union building. 

First semester president was Charles Slawson, with 
J. D. Skelton, former corresponding secretary, elected 
to succeed him second semester. 



132 



Ag Groups Set High Standards 



'~T~'HE professional agricultural fraternity, Alpha Zeta, 
started this year's activity with a fall smoker for 
those students scholastically eligible for membership 
in the organization. A similar affair was held during 
the spring semester. 

Prior to formal initiation, prospective members of 
Alpha Zeta were seen on the campus wearing blue 
denim and carrying farm implements with them. The 
new members are chosen on their abilities of leader- 
ship and high scholastic standing, being selected from 
the upper two-fifths of their class. 

Alpha Zeta has been on the Kansas State campus 
for 39 years. Leading the group as president this year 
was Floyd E. Rolf. 



Alpha Mu, honorary milling fraternity, has the dis- 
tinction of being the only chapter of the only milling 
fraternity in the world. Founded here in 1934, Alpha 
Mu has continuously worked to promote a closer re- 
lationship between its members and the milling in- 
dustry. 

In the fall, Alpha Mu held its annual smoker for all 
members of the milling department. At this time the 
organization presented a key to the outstanding fresh- 
man in the department. Each spring, a banquet is 
given by the active chapter for Alpha Mu alumni and 
new members. 

Presiding over the monthly meetings, where prob- 
lems of the industry are discussed, Hal Ross was presi- 
dent. Prof. R. O. Pence is the faculty advisor. 



ALPHA ZETA— Back row: Hal Ross, John Tasker, Clair Parcel, Glen 
Allen, Emery Castle, Roger Wilkowske. Third row: Shannon Nickel- 
son, Elmer Blankenhagen, Dick Winger, Marvin Riggs, William 
Richards, James Wood, Floyd Rolf. Second row: John Parsons, Ray 

ALPHA MU — Back row: Hal Ross, Arnold Latschar, William C. 
Glover, Donald C. Abbott, Ben Grogg. Thir row: John F. McCammon, 
William H. Richards, James F. Conn, Boyce W. Dougherty, Don H. 
Vanadgriff, Kenneth M. Fields. Second row: Harold L. Shields, Don 



Doyen, Samuel Claar, Fletcher Riggs, Richard Eaton, Frank Carpenter, 
Harry Mudge, Stan Fansher. Front row: Richard Gleue, George Kraus, 
Alfred Koch, Carl Carlson, Dean Schowengerdt, Charles Nesbit, 
Howard Lindholm, Howard Borchardt. 

E. Fleming, Royce O. Pence, Sr., John A. Shellenberger, Warren F. 
Keller, Frank W. Wischer, Arlin B. Ward. Front row: Stephen J. 
Loska, Ralph M. Wolffing, Royce O. Pence, Jr., Max R. Gould, B. 
Mario Dirks, James V. Otto, Samuel W. Porter, Cuauhtemoc Salazar. 





133 




SIGMA DELTA CHI— Back 
row: Roger Medlin, E. T. 
Keith, Maurice Cotton, Lewis 
Johnson, R. R. Lashbrook. 
Second row: John Tasker, 
Lowell Brandner, C. J. Med- 
lin, LeRoy Allman. Front row: 
Ralph Salisbury, William Bork, 
William Mall, Mike Burns, 
E. B. Macy. 



Recognize Journalistic Achievement 



/^vUTSTANDING men in the field of industrial jour- 
nalism are honored each year by being elected to 
membership in Sigma Delta Chi, honorary and profes- 
sional journalism fraternity. These members are selec- 
ted for scholarship, as well as for their demonstrated 
abilities in the journalism field. 

Sigma Delta Chi members are responsible for the 
wire-reports of games played away from home, which 
are announced at the varsity dances and in local theaters. 
Another project of the organization is publishing the 
annual April Fool's day edition of the Kansas State 
Collegian. The club did the catering this year for the 
Royal Purple Beauty Ball. 

Sigma Delta Chi has been active on this campus 
since 1912, and at the present, has a membership of 19- 
The organization works to encourage and improve 
the standards and ethics of journalism throughout the 
nation. Roger Medlin was president for the year and 



C. J. Medlin served as faculty sponsor. 

Industrious members of Theta Sigma Phi made their 
honorary organization one of the most active groups 
on the campus this year. 

Last fall, 11 Theta Sig members inaugurated their 
year of activity with a fall merry-go-round. On this 
occasion, the members escorted new women in jour- 
nalism to the homes of the journalism faculty for a 
"get-acquainted" evening. Fall semester activities were 
led by Nancy Diggle, with Doris Brewer presiding 
over the group during the spring semester. 

Theta Sig's most outstanding project was the annual 
Matrix Table banquet in March, which featured a prom- 
inent woman journalist as guest speaker. 

Women journalism students are selected for member- 
ship into Theta Sigma Phi on a basis of scholarship, 
responsibility and interest in journalism. 




THETA SIGMA PHI — Back 
row: Mary Mcllvain, Leslie 
Black, June Duphorne, Jean- 
nette Harper. Second row: 
Dorothy McGeorge, Helen 
Hostetter, Marilyn Davis. 
Front row: Doris Brewer, Nan- 
cy Diggle, Mae Weaver, Bar- 
bara Holmes. 



134 




OMICRON NU— Back row: 
Mildred I. Hall, Edna M. 
Gilmore, Edith C. Levedahl, 
Honor C. Pledger, Alma H. 
Giles, Carrol D. Ramsey. Sec- 
ond row: Barbara A. Carttar, 
Eleanor H. Schupbach, Vada- 
line A. Strobel, Carol J. 
Heter, Helen L. Rotty, Vir- 
ginia M. Howard. Front row: 
Vada V. Volkening, Caroline 
Perkins, Marjorie Knosrman 
Schowengerdt, Joy Z. Rein- 
hardt, Beatrice Tuggle, Mar- 
garet Pixley. 



Students Honored by National Clubs 



GETTING a rapid pace in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics this year, were the members of Omicron Nu, 
honorary and professional society for junior and senior 
women in that School. Undergraduates become eligible 
for Omicron Nu by maintaining a grade point average 
of 2.2, while graduate students must have a 2.75 aver- 
age. Leadership and research ability are also taken into 
consideration. 

This year, two teas were given — one to honor new 
freshman girls in home economics, and the other in 
honor of new transfer students. Each year, Omicron 
Nu presents an award of $10 to the freshman girl with 
the highest grades in the School of Home Economics. 
Omicron Nu plays an active part in the Hospitality 
Days program and open house. Another project of 
Omicron Nu is the extending of tutoring service to 
those students who require extra assistance in their aca- 
demic work. 



Omicron Nu president was Mildred Hall, with 
Beatrice Tuggle as secretary. 

Ur Rune, the Kansas State chapter of the American 
College Quill Club, is the only organization on the 
campus devoted to the promotion of creative writing 
among college students. Members of the Quill Club 
strive to set a high literary goal for students interested 
in creative writing. 

New members of the Quill Club are chosen each 
semester from all departments of the College by manu- 
scripts submitted to the membership committee. Each 
spring, Quill Club members combine their literary 
skill and publish a magazine, The Mirror. Many of the 
poems and stories are published in The Parchment, 
national publication of the Quill Club. Joy Reinhardt 
presided as Chancellor this year. 




QUILL CLUB — Back row: 
Edith C. Levedahl, Leslie 
Black, Barbara Roth, Mildred 
McMullen. Second row: Dana 
C. Jennings, Edgar J. Engel- 
ken, Martha J. Adams. Front 
row: Doris Brewer, Howard 
Neighbors, Bill Rossiter, Jay 
Reinhardt. 



135 




ALPHA DELTA THETA— Back row: Beverly Godfrey, Virginia 
Chamberlin, Marjorie Oliver, Suzanne Law, Francis Doreen Boisvert, 
Dororhy Gifford, Eileen Broberg, Harriet Hill, Betty Payne. Third 
row: Arvilla Johnson, Lois Folck, Dorothy Gwinn, Norma Magnus, 
Ilah Burkhead, Dorothy Berry, Mary Downey, Velma Brumm. Second 



tow: Marilee Stockebrand, Mary Frances Zink, Margaret Lancaster, 
Phyllis Barr, Pauline Fredrickson, Phyllis Artman, Dorothy Linn, 
Arlene Ableson, Ruth McCrerey. Front row: Patty Piffer, Mickey 
Prather, Harriett Taylor, Donna Kahl, C. A. Dorf, Charlotte Dorf, 
Rose Shumaker, Frances Brenner, Donna Beth Coon. 



Discussions, Banquets Fill Calendars 



S~\N FEBRUARY 12, members of Alpha Delta 
Theta, honorary organization for medical tech- 
nology students, celebrated its second years as a national 
organization on the Kansas State campus. A banquet 
was held on the occasion, and Dr. Ralph G. Ball, 
Manhattan physician, was speaker. 

Students selected for membership into Alpha Delta 
Theta must have maintained a C average in all courses 
of medical technology. 

Regular business meetings were held twice a month, 
with brief talks and discussions given by those in the 
profession of medicine and allied fields. In October, 
Prof. C. A. Dorf and six active members attended the 
national convention of Alpha Delta Theta in St. Paul, 
Minn. 

K-FRATERNITY— Back row: Albert Sheriff, Jr., Eugene Snyder, 
Charles Lyons, Dale Carr, Bob Berry, Art Hildenbrand, Harold Kiser, 
Carmen Wilcox, Fred Bennett, K. R. Brown, Charley Nighswonger. 
Third row: William Richards, Norville Gish, Michael Zeleznak, 
Richard Fuller, C. J. Thornton, Richard Boone, George Sherman, 
Loren Schroeder, August Bogina, Wayne Coltrain. Second row: Lud 



President of the group was Charlotte Dorf with 
Prof. C. A. Dorf and Dr. J. O. Harris as faculty sponsors. 

Eighty Kansas State athletes who have earned a 
varsity letter made up the membership of the K-Frater- 
nity this year. 

On February 16, active members of the organization 
entertained their local alumni at a banquet. The regular 
K-Fraternity dance was held in March, and to end 
their social activities for the year a picnic was given 
for all the members and their guests. 

Dave Weatherby presided as president this year, with 
Mike Zeleznak and George Sherman assisting with the 
administrative duties. Faculty sponsors were Lud Fiser 
and Fritz Knorr. 

C. Fiser, David Bremner, Clifford Batten, Jack Dean, Grover Nutt, 
Lawrence King, Huck Heath, Harold Bryan, Verne Converse, Howard 
Hamlin, Bob Ives. Front row: Jack Sharp, Royce Pence, Jr., Roland 
Case, James D. Weatherby, Richard J. Harman, Robert M. Palmer, 
Mario Dirks, Forris Frick, Roy Sherrell, Jim Danielson. 




136 



PHI EPSILON KAPPA — 
Back row: Eugene Snyder, 
Charles Watkins, Carmen 
Wilcox, Stanley Crawshaw, 
Fritz Knorr. Second row: 
Howard Hamlin, David Reli- 
han, F. J. Thompson, Maurice 
Thorne, Harold Kiser. Front 
row: John Conley, Conrad 
Moll, James Weatherby, Dean 
Oberhelman, Roy Sherrell. 




Scholarship Is Honorary Group Keynote 



T)HI EPSILON KAPPA is the honorary fraternity for 
men students majoring in physical education. Mem- 
bership in this organization is open to faculty members 
as well as college students. Students selected for mem- 
bership are chosen on a basis of scholarship and char- 
acter. 

Eugene Snyder, president, led the group in many 
activities this year. Phi Epsilon Kappa celebrated its 
annual Founders' Day with a banquet for members and 
alumni, and held several parties in cooperation with 
the women physical education majors. 

Once every year, the organization brings to the cam- 
pus, a prominent speaker from the professional field of 
physical education to speak to all phys ed majors. 
Fritz Knorr and Prof. L. P. Washburn act as faculty 
sponsors for the group. 



High-ranking junior students in the field of chemis- 
try were honored this year by being selected for mem- 
bership in Phi Lambda Upsilon, honorary chemical 
organization. 

Students are chosen from three chemistry fields, 
including chemistry majors, chemical engineers and 
milling chemists. Selection is based chiefly on scholar- 
ship, and those chosen must have maintained a scho- 
lastic average of over two point. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon held its national conclave meet- 
ing last summer at West Point, N. Y., and this chapter 
was represented by the president, Earl Couchman. Ini- 
tiations were held during both the spring and fall 
semesters, and banquets were given after the ceremonies. 

Each year, Phi Lambda Upsilon presents an award of 
chemical handbooks to those freshmen having the 
highest grades in chemistry and chemical engineering. 



PHI LAMBDA UPSILON— Back row: J. L. Hall, H. L. Mitchell, Beers, Harvey Spencer, Robert Schmidt. Front row: M. L. McDowell, 

William Honstead, D. C. Danielson, E. S. Stickley, G. A. McCaskill. Leonard Luehring, Lawrence Adee, Fred Kays, Leonard Wood, Richard 

Second row: Clyde Hinman, William Ketterman, C. A. Dorf, R. J. Medlin, Earl Couchman. 




137 




MU PHI EPSILON — Back 
row: Norene Francis, Eliza- 
beth Wilcox, Juanita Silva, 
Elizabeth Mustard. Second 
row: Geraldine Beam, Inez 
Strutt, Clarice Painter, Mary 
Henson, Jerry Gatz. Front 
row: Eula Taylor, Marion Ter- 
rill, Corine Holm, Patricia 
Moll. 



Foster Talents In Interest Groups 



T^ACH year, Mu Phi Epsilon presents two public 
recitals, with only members participating. The 
presentation of a scholarship in music is another of 
the plans discussed by the group. 

It is a national music sorority in the professional field 
and had 1 1 members this year. 

The organization was busy with activities and plans 
throughout the school year. Norene Francis, president, 
led the group in accomplishing their projects. 

National inspection of the chapter by the province 
governor took place January 13. After the day's activi- 
ties, a reception and musicale were held at the Eisen- 
hower home. Jerry Gatz was elected to the presidency 
for the spring semester. 



Interest and scholarship in radio courses are Radio 
Guild membership requirements. This is an honorary 
organization for radio students. 

As the main project for the year, members of Radio 
Guild worked to fulfill the qualifications for member- 
ship in Alpha Epsilon Rho, national radio fraternity. 

Regular business meetings were held twice a month 
and on these occasions, problems and current news in 
the field of radio were discussed. In December, the 
members of Radio Guild and their guests enjoyed a 
Christmas party given in the Flame Room at the 
Wareham Hotel. 

Jim Heaton was president of Radio Guild and 
Barbara Bross was secretary. 



■ • * . 




RADIO GUILD — Baclt row: 
Patricia Davis, Barbara Kel- 
logg, Barbara Bross, Betty 
Bicknell, Janey Hackney. 
Third row: Anna May Martin, 
Norma Jones, Jean Douglas, 
Beverly P r i b b I e, Virginia 
Howe. Second row: Vernon 
McGuire, Dan Clark, Jerry 
Collins, Gene Joslin, Howard 
Neighbor. Front row: Jeanne 
Hanly, DeVere Nelson, Bill 
Mall, oJ Ann Badley, James 
Heaton, William F. Anderson. 



138 




I 



NEARLY shook the auditorium right off my crest when I felt the prick of a shovel in my side 
slope. But when I investigated the matter, I decided that even a shovel prick can be an honor 
when General "Ike" throws a spadeful of you over his shoulder. 



People had been running around driving stakes in that portion of my anatomy for a couple of 
months before the touch-off blow fell on October 2 5 . Then a huge mechanical monster began taking 
giant-size bites out of my side where "Ike" had first wounded me. I got mad. In fact, I froze up. But 
when spring came and the gentle tread of moccasins replaced the stomp of GI boots, I gradually 
thawed out. 

Immediately taking advantage of my softened condition, bulldozers and steamshovels again 
started to roll toward the scar on my side. Then I found out what all the commotion had been for a 
year or so among the religious organizations. 

My employees were building a chapel — an all -faith Memorial Chapel, a place of quiet worship. 
The nation's favorite general, Dwight D. Eisenhower, had been honoring me and my veteran stu- 
dents and faculty when he turned the first spade for the memorial building. 

Then I began to understand that I wasn't being tortured, I was being beautified. And any coed 
who sits in one of my initialed chairs can tell you there is a difference. 

A harassed engineer dropped a blueprint on my face, and I discovered that the chapel — a lovely 

139 



piece of architecture — will be built of stone dug from one of my brother hills. More, it will be 
erected, for the major part with money donated by friends of the college and the idea. 

I have dozens of clubs with a religious purpose, and the chapel will be a boon to them. I've 
thought it over, and I guess it's O.K. with me if they want to dig a hole for a chapel in my side. Religi- 
ous organizations have been with me a long time. Most of them are sponsored by denominations of 
Manhattan churches and nearly all could find counterpart organizations on other Hills. 

They aren't stuffy, fire and brimstone clubs. Their members like to have a good time as much as 
anyone. But they have reverence and a sense of the spiritual, which, I fear to say, do not belong to all 
the seekers-after-knowledge that daily make cowpaths on my grass. Some of these religious groups 
are supported by as many as 500 members. 

Their aims are generally fellowship and brotherhood, which are good enough for me. Some add 
service to their objectives, and clean, generous living is a purpose of all. They have picnics, hayrack 
rides, periodical meetings. Many of the organizations are Greek-letter groups which hold formal 
pledgings and initiations just as other fraternities and sororities. They all contribute something to me. 

The largest of the clubs are the YMCA and the YWCA, or for those of you who haven't been on 
me very long, the Young Men's and Women's Christian Associations. They carry on extensive projects 
for the benefit of their members and the whole student body, and of course, for me. They often work 
in cooperation, they present skits, sponsor important speakers for all-College assemblies, provide dis- 
cussion groups, vesper services, club publications and banquets and dinners. 

Professors can sit on my steps and say this college generation is going to the dogs, but I personally, 
will never believe it as long as I can hold up unselfish student organizations like the ones I've been 
talking about. 




140 




Crowds gathered for the auction part of the evening 
of the Y-Carnival. Faculty members were sold off the 
for menial tasks and duties at the sorority, fraternity 
and organized houses. Hottest bidding occurred on Dean 
Rodney W. Babcock, who offered his services as a 
houseboy to the ones who could pay the most money. 
Pi Beta Phi topped the ante and the girls were served 
one spring evening by the Dean of Arts and Sciences. 



BidU dun cMiXflt 
At ty-Gan,H4AMjd 



A divorce court "to break up your frustration cycle" 
was another popular exhibit at the Y-Carnival, sponsored 
by the YM and YWCA. Students played bingo for 
prizes, wore paper caps and ate, which provided a true 
carnival atmosphere in the girls gymnasium. 




141 




The Y organizations, in addition to their essentially religious basis, 
see that their members and other students have a good time. Above 
are the YWCA big and little sisters at their annual fall get-together 
and mutual introduction party in the gym. 



yi4J Jtal Patty, Bafam 



Food, curios, jewelry, paintings and other miscellaneous items were 
sold to students at YW bazaar held in Rec Center. Booths were 
planned and kept by members of the interest groups of the organi- 
zation. 



142 




Rabbi Morton Fierman addresses a small discussion group 
during Religious Emphasis Week (top). The week included 
an assembly, discussion groups and programs at the organized 
houses. 



Ifut-tjm ActioUiai. 



The leadership of the two largest campus organizations, 
YWCA and YMCA, were in the capable hands of Mar- 
garet Garrison (center), and Charles Engelland (bottom). 
With a total of almost a thousand members, the groups 
plan projects designed to provide recreation and a religious 
background for all students at the College. 




143 




WILLIAM E. (Bill) WEST, moved his headquarters from Anderson 
Hall to the new Student Union this fall. From here he directs his 
work as Executive Secretary of the YMCA. 



"V7"MCA activity began very early in the school year 
when this organization provided workers to help 
with the recreation program for Freshman Orientation 
Week. The opening week was also the date of the 
traditional Football Kickoff and Watermelon Feed for 
all freshman men, annual events sponsored by the 
organization. 

The "Y" carried out its program in a new home this 
year. Offices were located in the temporary Student 
Union building. Here Wilbur Engelland as president; 



"Y" Groups Cooperate 

Larry McManis as first vice-president; Bob Weatherbie 
as second vice-president; Roger Wilk as third vice- 
president; and Harold Dalbom as recording secretary 
handled the executive matters of the "Y." Dr. Howard 
T. Hill was president of the Board of Directors. 

The general program of Young Men's Christian 
Association featured weekly meetings, radio programs 
over KSAC, and intramural teams. 

With Bill West as executive secretary, the "Y" of- 
fered assistance in solving personal problems. An up- 
to-date set of job information was on hand in the "Y" 
office and a part-time employment bureau was main- 
tained to help students in locating temporary work. 

One of the highlights of the "Y" year was the two- 
day Christian World Forum which was held in March 
and sponsored jointly by the YM and YW. The theme 
of the forum was "The Power of the Church." The 
guest speaker was the Rev. Robert S. Bilheimer of New 
York, who is Executive Secretary of the Inter-Seminary 
Movement. The forum opened with a banquet on 
Monday. On Tuesday Reverend Bilheimer spoke to 
a group on the subject of "Religion in Higher Educa- 
tion." Tuesday evening he addressed an audience com- 
posed of college students and townspeople in the Col- 
lege auditorium. 

In April came the twenty-seventh annual Y- 
Orpheum, which challenged all organized houses to 
display their talent and showmanship. 



YMCA CABINET— Back row: Philip DePuy, J. B. Wohlberg, Gail 
Salisbury, Richard Thuma, Donald Alexander, Ralph Arnold, Marvin 
Riggs, Harold Ray, Harold Walker, Bennie Stewart, Eugene Bruner. 
Second row: Thomas Means, Ray Doyen, M. F. Ahearn, Thurlo Mc- 



Crady, Edgar Bagley, Howard T. Hill, Arthur Peine, W. E. West, 
Robert Weatherbie, Jimmie Dixson. Front row: James dinger, 
Charles Engelland, Donald Jackson, Kay Siron, Harold Dalbom, John 
Sanchez, Lawrence McManis, Roger Wilk, Kenneth Bell, Dick Warren. 




144 



In Active Planning 

T^OUR hundred women enrolled at Kansas State this 
year were members of the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association. Under the supervision of Miss Billie 
E. Parkins, the YW initiated several new activities. 

The first was the organization of a Square Dance club 
with the cooperation of the YM. Every Thursday eve- 
ning, a square dance class was conducted by a faculty 
member. 

Another YM-YW project was the Friday-Niter 
Dance club. A series of six dances with a total admisison 
fee of $1.50, was held in Recreation Center. 

This year saw the introduction, by YW, of special 
leadership groups for freshmen. Under this program, 
all freshmen members formed a commission of their 
own to study the requirements for leadership in recre- 
ation and group singing. This freshman group also 
planned and presented a fashion show in November. 
The fashion review was given at the Manhattan Com- 
munity house, and the town women were guests. 

In the line of special events, the YW, in cooperation 
with the YM, was responsible for the appearance of 
several well-known speakers on the campus during the 
year. In February, Bayard Rustin, outstanding young 
Negro leader spoke in Rec Center on "The Effect of 
Prejudices." 

Brightly decorated tables laden with everything 
from bracelets to baby clothes, and the wonderful 
aroma of food, transformed Recreation Center for the 

YWCA CABINET — Back row: Marjorie Oliver, Georgi Gress, Helen 
Dameron, Betty Rich, Laverna Lenhart, Phyllis Martin, Eugenia 
Beezley, Guyla Love. Third row: Barbara King, Nadine Smith, 
Frances Davitt, Laberta Kugler, Patricia Baker, Lois Cummings, 
Patsy Davis, Jerry Gatz. Second row: Virginia Grandfield, Ruby Jo 




MISS BILLIE PARKINS, Executive Secretary of the YWCA, has seen 
many new projects initiated by the organization since her arrival here 
a year ago. 

Christmas Bazaar. 

President of the Association this year was Margaret 
Garrison. Assisted by Betty Rich as vice-president, 
Nira Scarborough as secretary, and Virginia Grandfield 
as treasurer, she led the group in their constant effort 
to follow the three-fold purpose of YWCA — "We 
unite in the desire to realize full and creative life 
through a growing knowledge of God. We determine 
to have a part in making this life possible for all people." 

Dr. Abby Marlatt was advisory board chairman. 

Morgan, Billie E. Parkins, Norma Lou Myers, Jane McDonald, JoEllen 
McNicholas, Jeanette Doran, Doris Granger. Front row: Marilyn 
Bohnenblust, Mary Gee, Kathleen Gossett, Ruth Gilek, Patricia 
McVey, Ruth Engelland, Margaret Garrison, Patty Wentworth. 




145 




RELIGIOUS FEDERATION— Back row: Rosalie Germann, Mary 
Jane Moore, Joe Weis, Irene Gehrke, B. A. Rogers, Barbara B. King, 
Virginia Grandfield. Second row: Howard Wood, Marion Hammar- 
lund, William M. McDonald, George Robinson, Harold Bartleson, 



Marvin Riggs, William Fiden. Front row: Dean Miller, Howard 
Lindholm, Loreta Stricklin, Loyal Payne, Pat McVey, Ray Booth, 
Irvin Lanier. 



Many Faiths Represented by 



A N ORGANIZATION of campus religious organi- 
zations is the Religious Federation. It is composed 
of two representatives from each student church group, 
two from YWCA, and two from YMCA. These repre- 
sentatives work together to promote cooperative social 
and religious programs among the student groups. 

Marvin Riggs was president of the group. He was 
assisted by Howard Lindholm, vice-president; Irvin 
Lanier, treasurer, and Rosalie Germann, secretary. L. 
F. Payne was the faculty sponsor. 

The Religious Federation sponsored Religious Em- 
pahsis Week from November 16 to 20. The five days 
were devoted to campus religious activities. Dr. Morris 
Wee of Madison, Wis., and Rabbi Norton Fierman of 
Tulsa, Okla., led the special assemblies and discussions. 



Kansas State Christion Fellowship began the year's 
special projects by giving a Temporary Handy Phone 
Directory to all students as they enrolled first semester. 

Later in the year this group sponsored the first show- 
ing in the mid-west of the colored movie, "God Of 
The Atom" and the only showing in the mid-west of 
the colored movie, "God Is My Landlord." 

Gospel teams — composed of a speaker, song leader 
and special music — were sent by the organization to 
surrounding towns. 

"To deepen and strengthen the spiritual life of mem- 
bers by prayer and Bible study" is the stated purpose 
of Kansas State Christian Fellowship. This year's offi- 
cers were Bob Milburn, president; Bernita Skelton, vice- 
president; and Bob Schultz, secretary. 



KANSAS STATE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP— Back row: Donald 
Chambers, Barbara Cotton, Ruth Kennedy, Margaret Cotton, Marjorie 
Loomis, Bernita Skelton, Helen Borck, Helen Milburn, Roberta Keas, 
Janet Ray, Norma Heikes. Third row: Mildred Sims, Marieta Snow- 
barger, Marion Hammarlund, Ralph Burdick, Richard Sackman, Del- 
bert Carper, Stanley Carroll, Mary Simpson, Richard Capp. Second 



row: Ross Sackman, Bill Hayden, Richard Spare, Richard Mossman, 
Wilber Johnson, Jared Barker, Jo Ann Flynn, Virginia Eddy, Eleanor 
Sommer, Bob Milburn. Front row: Verlin Easterling, Willis Melgren, 
Jason Spinnett, Robert Schultz, Duane Barney, Fred Borck, Alfred 
Gigstad, Loran Scott, Byron Whitehouse, Walter Zurfluh. 




146 




CANTERBURY CLUB— Back row: Ruthe Peg Knight, Harriet Wool- 
ley, Martha King, Herbert Singer, Katherine C. Lewis, Helen Rotty. 
Second row: Emma Hyde, John M. Bushnell, Jr., Mae Weaver, Galen 



Wiggans, Ardyce Gage, Shirley Scott. Front row: Robert N. Wilcox, 
Rodger Mitchell, Roy Goss, Robert V. Weaver, Russell Beers, Ray 
Beaver. 



Campus Religious Organizations 



' I f HE Canterbury Club of St. Paul's Episcopal church 
had a year filled with many activities. The mem- 
bership, which totaled 30, prepared and served a pan- 
cake supper to the public on Shrove Tuesday, before 
the beginning of Lent. The money received was given 
to the church as a Lenten offering. 

During the fall semester Canterbury Club was host 
to the Canterbury Clubs of the Episcopal churches in 
Lawrence and Wichita. 

First semester president was Roger Mitchell, while 
Bob Wilcox was chosen to lead the group second semes- 
ter. Other second semester officers were: Ray Beaver, 
vice-president; Shirley Scott, secretary, and Marilyn 
Mills, treasurer. Faculty sponsor was Miss Emma Hyde. 



Two hundred and twenty-five students form the 
membership of the Christian Student Fellowship. The 
purpose of this organization, which is one of the largest 
on the campus, is to reach every student of the Chris- 
tian church and its affiliates with a vital interpretation 
of Christian fundamentals. 

This organization has had a two-fold program during 
the past year. First was the support of an orphan in 
the Denver Christian Home for orphans. The second 
part of the program was the establishment of a student 
center near the campus. 

C.S.F. officers were: Paul Eckstein, president; Irvin 
Lanier, vice-president; Marybelle Kidd, secretary; and 
Ronald Schreiner treasurer. 



CHRISTIAN STUDENT FELLOWSHIP— Back row: Roy Cartee, 
Audrey Sims, Iris Reed, Roberta Keas, Marjorie Faris, Kathryn Robin- 
son, Bonnie Haffington, Marie Elsie Wineinger, Ima Jean Kidd, 
Wilma Thomas, Laverna Lenhart. Fourth row: Lavon Crawford, 
Marybelle Kidd, Genevieve Escritt, Dorothy Linn, Lois Cummings, Jo 
Harriett Hofsess, Jodie Klarguist, Ruth Kelling, Helen Lee Stricklin, 
Mildred Sims. Third row: Ruth Cartee, Nan Middleton, Howard 



Rix, Leroy Atwell, Bob Siler, Walter Pinon, Floyd Leonard, Calvin 
Smith, Evelyn Parks, Edwes Roush. Second row: Howard Rinkel, 
Bruce Garnand, Maurice Warner, James Farrar, Brady Fowler, Jim 
Wilcox, Loyd Garbe, W. A. Honeyman, Ernie Holmes, Forrest Smith. 
Front row: Clif Spangler, Roscoe Allen, Dan Nertz, John Stewart, 
J. B. Fleming, Ronald Schreiner, Loreta Stricklin, Irvin Lanier, Jean 
McCallum, Paul Eckstein. 




147 




CONGREGATIONAL STUDENT FELLOWSHIP — Back row: 
Elizabeth Perkins, Donald Drayer, Vada Volkening, Margaret Klema, 
Virginia Grandfield, Wanda L. Snyder, Carrol Ramsey. Third row: 
Betty Jean Harding, Vadaline Strabel, Louis Bender, Jr., Charles 
Armstrong, Norma Koon, Barbara Drayer, Caroline Perkins. Second 



row: Dean Misegades, William Brown, Rev. Charles Brewster, Ray 
Booth, Paul Mohn, Page Twiss. Front rota: Charles Rewert, John 
J. Lyon, Harold Velasquez, Lloyd Lewis, Richard Burns, Dorothy 
Bettenbrock, Trevor Rees. 



Guide Students in Christian Living 



"TN QUEST of the Best" is the motto of the Con- 
gregational Student Fellowship, an organization 
composed of college students of the Congregational 
church. 

Each Sunday night the members of this group meet 
at the church for supper and a discussion period. Social 
activities were not lacking, as the fall semester brought 
picnics and a Halloween party. In December came a 
Christmas party complete with caroling and a visit from 
Santa Claus. 

Louis Bender led the group as president. Other offi- 
cers were Thaine Larson, vice-president; Harold Velas- 
quez, secretary; Madonna Wooley, assistant secretary; 
and Dorothy Bettenbrock, treasurer. 



BAPTIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP— Back row: Joy Hemphill, Betty 
Lou Heggy, Compton Heggy, Katherine Stewart, Maxine Blanchard, 
Vernon Janssen, Marjorie Swart, Dorene Burnette. Third row: 
Kenneth Corke, George C. Stewart, Ray Blanchard, Marvin Riggs, 
Carolee Byerly, Joyce Stanton, Vivian Rice, Walter Rice, Jr., Donna 



The Baptist Youth Fellowship boasted an increase 
of 30 members this year to make the total 60. 

Growing in personal Christian living, helping others 
to become Christians, practicing Christian citizenship, 
and developing Christian leadership is the four-point 
purpose of this organization. 

A fellowship hour, lunch, and a discussion period 
comprised the programs of the Sunday evening meet- 
ings attended by this group. 

Directing the activities of the organization was Bob 
Hays, president. He was assisted by Eleanor Hardin, 
vice-president; Kay Hasegawa, secretary; and Forrest 
Adams, treasurer. Floyd Sloat and Paul Torrence were 
faculty sponsors. 



Lee Comfort. Second row: Forrest Adams, George A. Robinson, 
Calvin Kruse, Albert Barr, MacNelly Floyd, Eleanor Hardin, John 
Dozier, Edward Moody, Don Riegel. Front row: Harley Comfort, 
Eugene Lewis, Otis Gilliland, Phil Garrison, Harold Stanton, Charles 
Byerly, Bill H. Clark, Elbert Cozine, James Conn. 




148 



KAPPA BETA — Back row: 
Ruth Cartee, Esther Phillips, 
Helen Stricklin, K a t h r y n 
Robinson, Norma Magnus, 
Hope Leighton. Second row: 
Sallie Peterson, Lois Cum- 
ming, Loreta Stricklin, Louise 
Barnes, Jean McCallam, Dor- 
othy Linn. Front row: Kath- 
ryn Fryer, Margaret Lancas- 
ter, Neola Springer, Nan 
Middleton, Wilma Luthi, La- 
von Crawford. 




Church Sororities Provide Training 



' I 'O ESTABLISH and maintain a friendly relation- 
ship among women students of the Christian 
church is the primary objective of Kappa Beta, the 
national Christian church sorority. 

Norma Magnus led the group in its social and 
religious activities to make the work of Kappa Beta a 
real means of Christian influence among women stu- 
dents. Other officers were Loretta Stricklin, vice-presi- 
dent; Neola Springer, treasurer; Dorothy Linn, record- 
ing secretary; and Jean McCallum Peck, corresponding 
secretary. The church sponsor was Mrs. Roy Cartee 
and the faculty sponsor was C. O. Price. 

The 36 members of this organization worked 
throughout the year on special projects concerning the 
church program. Each girl spent time at the student 

KAPPA PHI — Back row: Elizabeth Jane Heckethorn, Carol Hoyt, 
Martha Selby, Phylis Birk, Mary Cook, Norma Evans, Wilma Stover, 
Mary Totten, Dorothy Socolofsky, Carolyn Bishop, Cecil Cary, Marilyn 
Keeshan, Frances Russell, Mildred Lindholm. Fourth row: Alverda 
Magnus, Joann Blackwelder, Doris Granger, Ruth Thomas, Gail 
Butler, Margaret Alderman, Kay Larson, Lyla Franklin, Elaine Sutter, 
Miriam Dunbar, Toni Darby, Marcelyn McCoy, Mary Jane Meili, 
Audrey Schmitt, Ruth Bauersfeld. Third row: Mary Lou Thuma, Jo 



center as hostess and the group worked together on 
seat cushions for student center chairs. 

Training Methodist college women to be leaders in 
the church of tomorrow is the purpose of Kappa Phi, 
national sorority for women of the Methodist church. 

One hundred and thirty-seven members of this organ- 
ization attended meetings twice a month at Wesley 
Hall. A wide field of subjects was discussed at the 
meetings, and on several occasions, the group enter- 
tained well-known guest speakers. 

The officers this year were: Marjorie Schowengerdt, 
president; Mary Liz Totten, vice-president; Dorothy 
Bebermeyer, recording secretary; and Mary Smith, 
corresponding secretary. Mrs. B. A. Rogers was faculty 
sponsor. 

Ellen McNichols, Bernita Stoecker, Josephine Pbdey, Wanice Walker, 
Margaret Reinhardt, Phylis Greenough, Pat Wentworth, Frances Dav- 
itt, Nancy Bryant, Willa Thompson, Charlene Cusic, Dorothy Adell, 
Kathlyn Kennedy, Mrs. B. A. Rogers. Front row: Oma Lou Frey, 
Bonnie Mallory, Katherine Wingert, Delores Collins, Judy Gardner, 
Myrna Adee, Marilyn Moomaw, Bonnie Sobers, Betty Rich, Martha 
Jane Henre, J. Patty Adams, Frances Boisvert, Lorine Fieser, Anne 
Ketterman. 




149 



Lutheran Youth Active in Church 



; I 'HE coldest night in September saw the beginning 
of this year's activities of Gamma Delta, national 
Lutheran fraternity. The occasion was a "Get Ac- 
quainted" wiener roast and song fest. 

The Lutheran group also sponsored a religious semi- 
nar which played host to college students from four 
states — Oklahoma, Nebraska, Missouri, and Kansas. 

At the national convention of Gamma Delta, Ken- 
neth Bender, a representative of this chapter was elected 
national vice-president. 

William H. Rossiter was president of Gamma Delta. 
Other officers were: Kenneth Bender, vice-president; 
Eula Mae Taylor, secretary; and Alfred J. Baden, treas- 
urer. Faculty sponsors were William Baehr and the 
Rev. H. H. Frohn. 



With a total membership of 75 college students, the 
Lutheran Student Association of the First Lutheran 
church, has had — a busy year. 

In February the group was host to Lutheran students 
from nine other colleges in Kansas and Nebraska. The 
occasion was the three-day Midwest Regional Mid- 
winter Training Conference for Lutheran students. 

A hilltop near Manhattan was the scene of the Palm 
Sunday Sunrise Service, which is an annual tradition 
observed by the Lutheran students. One Sunday during 
the year the group entertained Lutheran students from 
Bethany College. Coordinators of the year's activities 
were Robert Heline, president; Georgine Bischoff, vice- 
president; Joan Georg, secretary; Jim Strohm, treasurer. 
Inez Ekdahl and Dr. Verne Sweedlun were sponsors. 



GAMMA DELTA — Back row: Richard Meyer, Delmar Hatesohl, Nor- 
man Wilms, Donald Bender, Harlan Oelke, Lucille Gier, Eula Taylor, 
Mary Moore. Third row: Rev. H. H. Frohn, Robert Meyer, Lawrence 
Bullinger, Bill Rossiter, Oscar Albrecht, Lois Stuewe, Olivia Tiemann, 
Lucille Lenkner. Second row: Victor Bohling, Kenneth Dageforde, 
Alfred Baden, Vernon Bluhm, Wiliam Baehr, Edgar Bienhoff, Ken- 
neth Bender, Melvin Aufdemberge, Ruth Glanzer. Front row: Cecil 
Kluge, Elmer Stueder, John Wagner, Marion Quasebarth, Harvey 
Arand, Clarence Suelter, Orvin Tiemann, Dean Miller. 



LUTHERAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION— Back row: Irene Hen- 
ningson, Irene Gehrke, Margaret A. Johnson, Anna Gotti, Ada Heline, 
Doris Velen, Nada Weddle, Mary Olson. Third row: Robert C. Olsen, 
Ross Schimmels, Joan Georg, Georgine Bischoff, Twila Oltjen, 
La Verne Johnson, Paul Dahlsten. Second row: Byron Albers, Robert 
Heline, William M. McDonald, Elmer Rigel, Wilber Johnson, 
Marion Hammarlund, Braven Carlson, Norman Tornquist. Front row: 
Everett E. Janne, Clinton F. Lindquist, James Strohm, Desmond Stan- 
ton, John Sjo, Inez Ekdahl, Wayne Battels, Warren Albers, Leon 
Lungstrom. 





150 




•■sdj 




L v/ I 



WESLEY FOUNDATION, Panel one— Back row: Mrs. B. A. Rogers, 
Lancaster, Hughs, E. Speer, R. Speer, Hamilton, Eversmeyer. Seventh 
row: Frownfalter, Wilk, Schneider, Stone, Smith, Silson, Deets, Bradley. 
Sixth row: Anderson, Chenhsia, McPhail, Long, Fobes, Martin, Taylor, 
George, Warren, Krause. Fifth row: Jensen, Wood, Chesney, VanPelt, 
Blinn, Lungren, Goyen, Sherling, Boyen, Rishel. Fourth row: Brown, 

WESLEY FOUNDATION, Panel two— Back row: McReynolds, Ro- 
dick, Gaskell, Reiff. Twelfth row: Orr, Flaherty, Thompson, Scott, 
Hinman, Anderson, Evans, Wood, Samuelson, Hackney, Christiansen. 
Eleventh row: Siegele, Ketterman, Cook, Totten, Darby, Stover, Grote, 
Schmitt, Lindholm, Thorn. Tenth row: Barber, Ketterman, D. Neher, 
R. Neher, Ummel, H. Neher, Lingelbach, Pixley, Horton, Fiesser, 
M. Lindholm, J. Lindholm. Ninth row: Alderman, Butler, Anderson, 
McNicholas, Blackwelder, Granger, Van Cleave, Adams, Champlin. 
Eighth row: Phillips, Allman, Larson, Reinhardt, Cade, Dunbar, 
Jaedicke, Blystone, Meili, Blood. Seventh row: McNaughton, Thomas, 



Nickerson, Mamaw, Clarke, Ruhaak, Kennedy, Heckethorn, Hoyt, 
Russell, Bauersfeld, Adell, Mueller, Selby, Birk. Third row: Berrie, 
Sprinkel, Wingert. Hill, Frey, Magnus, C. Cary, D. Cary. Second row: 
Tracy, Jensen, Anderson, Chapman, Thuma, Mallory, McCoy, Du- 
phorne. Front row: Pixley, Lawyer, Cusic, DeWees, Bair, Writh, Van 
Vliet, Walker. 

Bearse, Chenoweth, Paine, Franklin, Keeshan, Harding, Wittenborn. 
Sixth row: Harbert, Wilk, Schowengerdt, Smith, Stoecker, Turner, 
Roembach, Socolofsky, Bishop, Van Skike. Fifth row: Eyestone, H. Star- 
key, M. Starkey, Moeller, Gilbert, DeFord, Wood, Crow. Fourth row: 
Martin, White, West, Schwartzkoph, Reinhardt, Greenough, Went- 
worth, Davitt, Cool, Sutter, Cowell, Moore, Madison. Third row: 
Roepke, Snider, Bebermeyer, Brown, Tilley, Kirkendall. Second row: 
McGinness, Hokombe, Adee, Davis, Rule, Westfall, Meyers, Down- 
ing, Grandfield, Carey, Boisevert. Front row: Gardner, Collins, Sobers, 
Moomaw, Dickey, Mills, Austin, Rich, Henre, Morgan, Jacques. 



Wesley Foundation Provides Fellowship 



' I 'HE publication of a year book, The Wesley Wild- 
cat, was just one of many projects completed by 
the Wesley Foundation this past year. 

This organization was composed of Kansas State 
College men and women who had a Methodist Church 
preference. Its membership during the past year totaled 
350. 

There are meetings each Sunday morning and eve- 
ning of the Wesley Foundation at which the members 



join together for religious inspiration and fellowship. 

Edward McNaughton ably led the organization 
through the year's activities as president. Assisting him 
on the cabinet were John Lindholm, vice-president; 
Vernita Stoecker, secretary, and Merle Siegele, treasurer. 

The weekly Saturday-nighter provided plenty of fun 
for the group, as it was the "home away from home" 
for the Foundation members. Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Rogers 
sponsored Wesley Foundation during this past year. 



151 




METHODIST MEN'S CLUB — Back row: Edward McNaughton, 
Wayne Turner, Ray Thompson, Howard Wood, Frank Hamilton, 
Robert Thorn. Third row: William Ketterman, Wayne Cowell, Loren 
Martin, Lewis Schneider, Raymond George, Raymond Neher, John 



Lindholm. Second row: Kenneth McReynolds, Kenneth Kirkendall, 
John Hughs, John Reiff, Clyde Hinman, Howard Lindholm, Harold 
Eversmeyer. Front row: Keith Brown, Chris White, Merle Siegle, 
Donald Lancaster, Lester Goyen, Herbert Lungren, Max Deets. 



Church Groups Work for Fellowship 



A WELCOMING picnic for freshman men marked 
the beginning of the first semester social activities 
for the Methodist Men's Club. This organization, 
which had a membership totaling 35, had the worth- 
while purpose of promoting good fellowship and social 
relations among the Methodist college students. 

The second and fourth Tuesdays of each month 
were meeting days for the men of the club to get 
together for varied programs. Sometimes they formed 
an audience for a book review. Foreign students spoke 
to the club several times and in March a discussion on 
Palestine was led by two students from that country. 

Problems of the organization of the college church 
students were discussed at a joint meeting of Kappa 
Phi and the Men's Club in March. In the spring the 
two organizations enjoyed food and recreation at a 
picnic near Manhattan. 



It was the aim of the College Fellowship, which 
is composed of students of the United Presbyterian 
church, to have a party a month. While this goal was 
not reached every month, the eighteen members did 
enjoy several hayrack rides in the fall, a Christmas 
gathering, and a party on Valentine's Day. 

In addition to following the purpose of the organi- 
zation, which was to help the young people of the 
church in finding the Christian way of living, the group 
carried out several projects. They contributed to the 
support of the United Presbyterian Negro Mission in 
California, and at Christmas time they helped pack a 
box for a mission Kentucky. 

Rosalie Germann was president, Corinne Taylor 
was vice-president, and Lucille Wendland was secretary- 
treasurer. 




UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 
— Back row: Margaret New- 
comb, Lucille Wendland, Bon- 
nie Dee Taylor, Corinne Tay- 
lor, Rosalie Germann, Ber- 
nice Richter. Second row: 
Mary Wendland, John Schlen- 
der, Earl Phillips, Earl Wend- 
land, Jimmie Curry, Rev. J. 
W. Curry, Mrs. Bernice Curry. 
Front row: George Robinson, 
Paul Thompson, Fred Ger- 
mann, Phillip Wendland, Har- 
old Bartleson, Jack Richter. 



152 




PHI CHI DELTA— Back row: Betty O'Neal, Joline Nelson, Suzanne 
Law, Arvilla Johnson, Nancy Munger, Margery A. Mitchell, Connie 
Pat McGinness, Barbara Jean Baker. Second row: June Graff, June 
Schindler, Joy Reinhardt, Bennita Knox, Barbara Adee, Helen Gill- 



more, Lela Warner, Virginia Shrake. Front row: Patty Piffer, Barbara 
Miller, Jeanne Miller, Shirley Braman, Edwina Frick, Norma Mc- 
Dowell, Jeannette Hargis, Norma L. Myers. 



Presbyterian Students in Busy Year 



T)HI CHI Delta and Westminster Foundation are the 
two student organizations of the First Presbyterian 
church. Phi Chi Delta is composed of the women stu- 
dents, while Westminster Foundation includes both 
men and women. 

The 35 members of Phi Chi Delta carried out a 
program this year filled with business and social func- 
tions. 

In September, this group gave a welcoming picnic 
for freshmen women. Westminster House was the 
scene of the organization's Christmas party. March 
meant formals and the annual formal initiation dinner. 

The March meeting of the group was known as the 
"sharing meeting." It was held at the home of one of 



the patronesses and everyone brought and read their 
favorite poem. 

Betty O'Neal was the Phi Chi Delta president. She 
worked with the other officers, Barbara Baker, vice- 
president; Virginia Furlong, secretary; and Virginia 
Shrake, treasurer in leading the group. 
Mrs. W. U. Guerrant was faculty sponsor. 

Bible study and prayer, understanding the Christian 
faith, worship and service in the church, growth in 
Christian character, and stewardship were some of the 
objectives of Westminster Foundation. 

Officers were James P. Wood, president; Thomas 
Jefferson, vice-president; Ruth Reist, secretary; and 
Mary Rohr, treasurer. The Rev. W. U. Guerrant was 
faculty sponsor. 



WESTMINSTER FOUNDATION— Back row: Donna Brown, Phyllis 
Fine, Jack Schneiker, Donna Doll, Laberta Kugler, Guyla Love, Mary 
Wood. Third row: Helen Hammond, Robert Acre, Jr., Wayne Prich- 
ard, Lue Clayton, Marilyn Bohnenblust, Kathleen Eyman, Helen Gill- 
more, Clarice Hammond. Second row: Philip DePuy, John Hepler, 



Gail Salisbury, Wayne Doll, Bill Neff, Norma McDowell, Thomas 
Jefferson, Rev. W. U. Guerrant, Doris Crandall. Front row: John 
Downie, Jr., James Wood, Kenneth Bell, Richard Clarke, David 
Bartholomew, Wait Sterling, Harold Dalbom, Wendell Lind. 




153 



THETA EPSILON — Back 
row: Edna Briggs, Irma Ready, 
Dorothy Dooley, Mary Smith, 
Marjorie Oliver, Georganna 
Sells, Versa Mansfield. Third 
row: Adelia Buss, Jewell Hill, 
Jean Holmgren, Mildred Reis- 
ner, Dorene Burnette, Mar- 
jorie Ewart, Fannie West. 
Second row: Maxine Blanch- 
ard, Alice Baker, Thelma Sted- 
ham, Pauline Fredrickson, Lois 
Sarver, Dorothy Henson. Front 
row: Katherine Stewart, Elean- 
or Hardin, Kate Clark, Bar- 
bara Bamford, Kathleen Gos- 
sett. 




Prepare for Future Church Leadership 



' I 'O HELP prepare the members for leadership in 
the church of tomorrow and to increase the fellow- 
ship among Baptist women students on the campus was 
the purpose of Theta Epsilon, the Baptist women's 
national sorority. 

Marjorie Ewart led this group as president and was 
assisted by Maxine Blanchard, first vice-president; Dor- 
ene Burnett, second vice-president; and Pauline Fred- 
rickson, treasurer. Miss Sella Harriss was the faculty 
sponsor. 

The twenty-five members had as their overall pro- 
gram "Serving Christ." This theme was carried out 
through the different projects in which the Theta Epsi- 
lon girls participated. 

The two principal projects were making Christmas 
toys for the James Street Mission in Kansas City and 
mending used clothing, which was sent to Europe. 



The roll call of Sigma Eta Chi, the national soror- 
ity for women of the Congregational Church shows 
an increase in membership over last year and now totals 
17. These 17 members have worked together through- 
the year to further the spiritual development of stu- 
dents in harmony with education — which is the purpose 
of Sigma Eta Chi. 

Sigma Eta Chi's president this year has been Vada 
Volkening. Carol Blecha filled the office of secretary, 
and Caroline Perkins served as treasurer. 

One Sunday evening during Lent, Sigma Eta Chi 
sponsored the annual candle-light service known as 
Luchnokaia, at the Congregational Church. Against 
a background of music each member of the congrega- 
tion lighted a candle from the seven candles represent- 
ing the seven great guiding lights of the Christian faith, 
and left the church, each pledging a more consecrated 
life. 



SIGMA ETA CHI — Back 
row: Vada V. Volkening, 
Wanda L. Snyder, Carrol 
Ramsey, Virginia Grandfield. 
Second row: Mrs. L. E. Call, 
Margaret Klema, Caroline 
Perkins, Barbara Drayer, Betty 
Jean Harding. Front row: 
Norma R. Koon, Dorothy A. 
Bettenbrock, Carol Blecha, 
Elizabeth Perkins. 




154 




NEWMAN CLUB — alphabetical list of members: G. Adams, W. Adams, J. 
Altepet, R. Anderson, W. Anderson, J. Andrisevic, F. Aschenbrenner, J. Baden, 
A. Baker, L. Banowetz, E. Bartslas, A. Beat, J Bettinger, J. Bear, W. Bielski, F. 
Billiard, B. Borst, E. Borst, J. Boyle, W. Boyle, J. Brady, J. Bradshaw, L. Bugel. 
P. Burns, B. E. Callahan, B. Callahan, F. Callahan, Prof. J. P. Callahan, J. Car- 
roll, W. E. Clarkson, M. Collister, B. Conway, G. Costello, H. Clark, C. Copt, 
S. Cucalizo, J. Curtis, G. Damiani, A. Davis, W. E. Davis, L. Desilet, J. Deary, 
L. DeMers, C. Dickenson, J. Dickenson, M. M. Downey, O. Dowling, B. Dress, 
A. Dueser, M. Dunn, J. Eggan, E. Eichman, J. Eilers, P. Engelken, W. English. 
W. Eulow, E. Fairbanks, J. Fay, J. .Feight, R. Finegan, B. Finuf, W. Finuf, J. 
Fischer, H. Funke, F. Fritschen, E. Garvis, E. Gast, P. Gates, W. Gaughan, J. 
Glenn, B. Glotzbach, C. Glotzbach, M. Glotzbach, R. Glotzbach, D. Gorman, 
C. Goris, B. Green, C. Green, P. Grentner, M. Griffin, B. Grosdidier, R. Gros- 
didier, J. Gruber, M. J. Guerrant, H. Hacher, N. Hanlin, H. Heise, J. Helfrey, 
R. Hengel, E. Hickert, W. Hollecker, D. Holmes, B. Hawley, P. Hruska, C 
Hund, J. Hunt, M. Immenshuh, T. Ingenthron, C. Imel, P. Irvine, J. Irvine, D. 
Jackson, B. D. Jacobs, B. Jilka, L. E. Jilka, M. Karlin, B. Karls, M. Keegan, J. 
Kilkenny, E. Kletchka, P. Kohlrus, A. Kongs, R. Kramer, J. B. Kring, B. Krause, 
P. Kuckelman, D. Krizman, E. Lanoui, D. Lasnier, R. LeDuc, B. Lehnen, J. 



Laughlin, P. Laughlin, M. A. Leonard, P. Leonard, E. Lidinsky, A. Liebeno, R 
Lang, B. Lorson, M. Lorson, K. Mahoney, B. Markey, N. Martin, T. Marx, D 
McCarthy, E. McNeal, J. Melroy, J. Meyer, L. Meyer, E. Moehlman, R. J. Mor 
gan, G. Muckenthaler, L. Muckenthaler, C. Mulhern, L. Mulhern, R. McClure 
E. Nease, M. B. Needham, M. Nelson, C. Niernberger, Mrs. C. Noonan, J 
Noonan, J. Noone, L. Ondia, P. O'Grady, R. Pearson, A. Paluch, W. Pender 
gart, V. Piesche, H. Pledger, B. L. Pressgrove, J. Pretz, L. C. Reardon, M 
Regan, P. Reznicek, J Rieg, J. Roach, J. Rode, J. Rockers, B. Rottinghaus, L 
Ryan, J. Russell, M. Sack, G. Scanlon, J. Scherer, M. Schlagel, The Rev. R 
Schott, P. Scully, F. Schmidt, J. Schnittker, H. Schrader, J. Schrader, J. Schrader 
J. Schruben, J. Schrum, B. Sedlock, M. Sestric, L. Sharpsteen, B. Shea, P. Shi 
nogle, N. Sidorowicz, T. Skahan, I Siebert, J. Starch, K. Steinkirchner, D. Stock 
man, G. Stork, K. Strathman, G. Strosmider, K. J. Strene, L. Taylor, M. Trinner 
meyer, J. Thielen, L Unrein, B. Valle, M. Vince, E. Viale, E. Voelker, R. Voll 
bracht, L. Waller, B. Watson, V. Weber, A. Weissbeck, D. Weixelmen, J 
Welch, The Rev. E. J. Weisenberg, C. Wempe, D. Wendele, K. Wintersheidt 
J. White, L. Whitehair, R. Whitehair, C. Wolfkamp, R. Ayart, M. Zeleznak 
Mrs. P. Zeleznak, J. Zoeller. 



Newman Club Membership Shows Increase 



A 30 PERCENT increase over last year's member- 
ship was the claim of Newman Club, an organi- 
zation for Catholic students. The club now has a total 
membership of 650. There were 500 members last year. 

On the first Sunday of every month, the Newman 
Club meets at a breakfast held at the Church. Follow- 
ing the breakfast, a meeting and a program are held. 

In cooperation with other college Catholic organi- 
zations in the state, the club sponsored the annual 



symposium. The symposium was a religious play which 
was presented in many towns throughout Kansas. The 
cast was composed of one member from each col- 
lege's Newman Club. 

Serving as president of the Newman Club during 
its past year was Larry Ryan. Kenny Winterscheidt 
capably filled the office of vice-president. Other officers 
were Jean Laughlin, secretary, and Leonard Taylor, 
treasurer. Sponsor of the Newman Club during the past 
year was J. P. Callahan. 



NEWMAN CLUI3 — alphabetical list of members: J. P. Alderman, A. Armstrong, 
Mrs. E. Armstrong, P. Beeby, Mrs. P. Beeby, J. Biggs, R. Cushing, Q. Donnellan, 
R. Hartwell, R. Inskeep, D. Jackson, E. Jansen, V. Jacobs, M. Karlin, A. Kobs, 
R. Karls, B. Keating, P. Kelley, E. Kenny, R. Kirsch, W. Krause, J. Lambert, 
D. Landis, D. Link, R. McFadden, C. McMahon, T. Mees, J. Moran, R. Moritz, 
Mrs. F. Moritz, D. Neubert, B. Neely, J. Olsen, S. E. Overbele, P. Pace, J. 



Pankaskie, G. Park, B. Parizo, V. Pence. M. Perkins, C. Pitcher, L. Pilcher, 

A. Pante, R. A. Prior, C. Prett, T. Quilty, E. Quint, L. Redlineer, B. Riechert. 

B. Richards, W. F. Robohn, J. Roth, A. Sachen, M. Schwartz, W. Schillijons, 
E. Seever, M. Setter, S. Stovall, G. Stresnider, P. Sweeney, A. Triska, D. Van- 
haverbeke, L. Van Muir, V. Vansickel, F. Wagner, Jr. 




155 




COUNTRY Club Hill, College Hill, Fraternity Hill, hills everywhere about me — they're all 
brothers and sisters of mine. Sometimes I feel a little left out. When classes are over and jan- 
itors come, I lie and think of the gay times my students are having on other hills. And even 
though we are closely related, I sometimes envy my brother and sister hills. 

Swishing formals at beautiful dances, gay informal parties, fumbling and clattering kitchen raids 
— even the long study hours. Gee, I'd like to have fun too. 



I shouldn't brood though, and don't often. The hills help me and my students. These are the hills 
that house many of my students. House them, feed them, look after their welfare — and entertain 
them. These are the hills of my social organizations. There are the fraternities, sororities, dormitories, 
and independent organized houses. 

Any student with the inclination can join one of these organizations which are so concerned with 
the life of my students. For the independents, there are Amistad and Amicossembly. For the Greeks, 
the governing bodies are Panhellenic and the Interfraternity Council — and for both, there are the 
houses themselves. They offer much in mutual interest, scholarship promotion, companionship and of 
course — recreation. 

It has always been my own opinion (of course hills have opinions!) that my students learn al- 
most as much while spending their college years on these brother hills as they do on me. It is on these 
related, social hills that they learn to get along with their fellows and apply to advantage all the 

157 



knowledge they gather from me. They tell me, this is the fundamental purpose of the social organi- 
zations. 

I like fraternities and sororities and independent houses. They can laugh at themselves and yet 
remain intensely loyal to themselves. And they flatter me a little. Just look where they are. True, 
most of them are on other hills, but they still stay close to me. They completely surround me. And 
they back me up — just watch some student forget me. These social organizations send the strays right 
back to me — to my library study rooms to brood over their forgetfulness. We get along fine. 

A few of the social groups even prefer me to the other hills. I provide housing for members of 
several dormitories for independent students. There are Van Zile Hall, East and West Stadium 
Dorms, and Moro Courts — commonly called "Splinterville." In addition, I house the nurses, the fire- 
men, the night-working seniors at the vet hospital — and more than 600 student couples and their 
children. ' 

In these homes of the married veterans I have heard the squall of newborn babes, the clank of 
washing machines and the gay back-fence gossip of a residential district. There are more than 500 
children living on me now — and less than a dozen of them are old enough to start school. 

Single men living in my housing are in Moro Courts, West Stadium or the Hospital Annex. 
Single women live in East Stadium or in Van Zile Hall. There is one more dormitory for single 
girls — a remodeled apartment house called Waltheim Hall — and it is only one block to the south 
of me. 

On second thought, I guess I really don't envy my brother hills. Rather, I guess they envy me. 
You see, I am really the center of all activity. 




158 




Holiday seasons mean parties for independents, and with 
every weekend a holiday . . . well . . . Campus Courts mothers 
and children celebrate Christmas with a gathering around the 
huge tree [top). 



The dining room of Van Zile Hall is packed with dancing 
couples during an hour dance (center left). Members of Ami- 
stad, too, dance for an hour following the regular business 
meeting {center right). Girls of Coed Court throw a house 
party for their dates, but make the dates do the entertaining 
{bottom). 



159 




GOVERNING AMISTAD the past year were left to right Back row: 
Gail Morrison, Stanley Meinert, Dale Bohnenblust, Lewis Fairbanks. 
Front row: Jule Thompson, Deloris Collins, Juanita Luthi, Faye Con- 
verse, Arthur Blanchat. 

T) OASTING the largest social organization on the 
campus, Amistad with its 270 members also parti- 
cipates in campus activities. It was first organized in 



Amistad Rules Independents 

1944 in response to a growing need for unified social 
activity among Independents. 

Open to both men and women, the organization 
was formed to provide for the social life and recreation 
for students not living in an organized house or social 
fraternity. It also aims to present to these students 
important school problems in order that they may take 
an active part in the life of the College. 

Amistad's leaders for the year were: president, Art 
Blanchat; vice-president, Dale Bohnenblust; treasurer, 
Faye Converse; social chairman, Gail Morrison; mem- 
bership chairman, Lewis Fairbanks. 

The biggest event of the year for Amistad was the 
Princess Prom, a semi-formal dance which they spon- 
sored. 



aMISTAD — Back row: Laverne Dewee, Bonnie Sobers, Catherine 
Conrad, Juanita Luthi, Mary Frances Weaver, Margaret Atwood, 
Kathryn Robinson, Mary Alice Nelson. Third row: Arthur Blanchat, 
Faye Converse, Margie Pishny, Pat Pottorff, Barbara Holcombe, Ed 
Carleton, Billy Langhofer, Helen Borek, Carolyn Stein, Jean Engler, 

AMISTAD — Back row: Carol Streit, Lucille Gier, Mary Chapman, 
Veronica Weber, Betty Duphorne, Evelyn Erichsen. Third row: Dean 
Streiff, Donald Rader, Norman Rogers, Kenneth Myer, Robert Jac- 
ques, James Holman. Second row: Burl Baker, Shirley Cheatum, Jack 



Second row: Herbert Singer, Jo Ann Blackman, Jule Thompson, Shirley 
Braman, John Bischoff, Herbert Brockey, Walter Pinon, Kenneth 
Venburg, Kenneth Lettrell, Lucy Bugel. Front row: Deane Swanson, 
Loys Guest, Gerald Venburg, Floyd Tiffany, Stanley Meinert, Thomas 
Wilson, Alan Moser, Alan Pittaway, Robert Wilson, V. S. Kirkendall. 

Newell, John Wagner, Earnest Christie, James Wiesendanger, Gail 
Morrison. Front row: Gretchen Stockwell, Keith Venburg, William F. 
Bradley, Dale Bohnenblust, William Phillips, Jack Hedgecock, John 
Lyon, Herbert Traulsen. 





160 



- » i 



m\ f m > !M 




AMICOSSEMBLY OFFICERS— Back row: Betty D. Nordyke, Mary 
Cook, Nelda Barclay. Second row: Dolores M. Knapp, Dalena Currier, 
Donna Gies, Velma M. Weaver, Helen L. Rotty, Barbara E. Kraemer, 



Virginia Olson, Dorothy Barber, Frances Brenner. Front row: Joan 
Jacobs, Laberta Kugler, Mary Smith, Francie Weaver, Ruth Mc- 
Crerey, Darilene Hague, Elinor Bush, Dorothy Beberemeyer. 



Amicossembly Aims at Creating Friendliness 



^T'HE PURPOSE of the Amicossembly is to unite all 
independent women who live in organized houses. 
Creating friendliness among the students and helping 
freshmen women to become better acquainted with 
campus activities are also part of the program in 
Amicossembly. 

This year the president and social chairman of 
1 3 houses made up the Amico Council. Those included 
in Amicossembly are: Arcadia, Chatterbox, Clark's 
Gables, Coed Court, Crippen Inn, Hills' Heights, Keim's 
Kabana, La Fiel, Maison-elle, Moore th' Merrier, Pal- 
O-Mie, Skywood Hall, Tramalai. 

Officers are: Betty Nordyke, president; Mickey Pra- 
ther, vice-president; Darilene Hague, secretary-treasurer. 

Sponsor Social Activities 

Amicossembly sponsored a picnic this fall for all the 
independent women. A mixer was given at the begin- 
ning of the spring semester. The Amicossembly Council 
can boast of its own constitution and by-laws which 
were written in 1944. 

Among the future plans toward which the Amico 
Council is working, is the addition of more organized 
houses into the assembly. Eight girls must live in an 
organized house before it may be accepted into the 
organization. 



Mrs. Robert King is the faculty sponsor for Amico- 
ssembly this year. 

Regular meetings of Amicossembly are held the first 
Wednesday of each month. This assembly gives the 
houses an opportunity to work out their problems to- 
gether and take part in activities at Kansas State as a 
group. 

Amicossembly was organized in response to a grow- 
ing need for unified social activity among Independents. 
It is serving its purpose successfully. 



PRINCESS CAROL WAGGONER of the Princess Prom sponsored 
by Amistad and Amicossembly, is shown dancing with her date fol- 
lowing her coronation. 




161 




VAN ZILE HALL — Top row: Miss Dorothy Hamer, Lucile Adamson, 
Barbara Adee, Martha Adee, Margaret Alderman, Carolyn Anderson, 
Alice Mae Baker, Natalie Anne Baker, Francis Baldwin, Nellie Bau- 
man, Jean Bergner, Dorothy Berry. Fourth row: Phyllis Jean Biery, 
Georgine Bischoff, Dorothy Bochaus, Marilyn Bohnenblust, Thyra 
Bollinger, Mary Brakebill, Lorna Broberg, Deloris Broce, Donna 
Brown, Hannah Brown, Lois Brown, Nancy Bryant, Dorene Burnette, 
Gail Butler. Third row: Helen Calkins, Tamara Chajuss, Betty Jean 
Chelstrom, Eileen Clark, Ethel Cochran, Jane Colby, Mary Collins, 



Deane Dameron, Margie Davies, Diann Davis, Betty Dickinson, Vir- 
ginia Eddy, Mary Edwards. Second row: Jo Anne Elmborg, Ruth 
Engelland, Jane Engle, Marjorie Ewart, Kathleen Eyman, Marjorie 
Faris, Lorine Fieser, Norene Francis, Lyla Franklin, Muriel Helen Frey, 
Oma Lou Frey, Betty Jean Fritzler, Marilyn Froman. Bottom row: 
Julia Gardner, Margaret Garrison, Joan Georg, Beverly Godfrey, 
Ethel Gorgas, Elizabeth Gould, Joanne Gross, Mary Helen Gunning, 
Janey Hackney, Grace Hall, Patricia Harger, Pearl Harrison, Jean 
Helfrey. 



Van Zile Hall 



'"T'WENTY-TWO year old Van Zile Hall, named 

for Dean Emeritus Mary P. Van Zile, is the only 

permanent women's domitory on the campus. Opened 

in 1926, it has housed approximately 3,000 women 



Van Zile Hall, largest permanent- dormitory on the Campus, 
houses 170 coeds. 




since that time. Built to accomodate 130 women, it 
has operated with 170 during the past two years. 

The dining room at Van Zile is under the direction 
of the Department of Institutional Management with 
a dietician in charge. 

Miss Dorothy Hamer, director of women's housing 
at Kansas State, is housemother for Van Zile. Jean 
Helfrey was president this year. 

Represented by Glendeen Link and Dorothy Stover, 
Van Zile won the doubles in tennis. This hall won first 
place in the swimming meet and participated in posture, 
volleyball, basketball, and table tennis contests. 

"Gypsy Caravan" was the theme of the annual fall 
formal held at the dorm on November 21. It was at- 
tended by about 200 couples. 

Outstanding students include members of Student 
Council, Kappa Phi, Prix, Kansas State Players, the 
senior class secretary and the president of the YWCA. 



162 




VAN ZILE HALL — Top row: Peggy Markham, Bonna Maxfield, 
Reine Mehl, Mary Jane Meili, Mary Meyer, Barbara Miller, Janice 
Miller, Marrha Jane Moats, Iolene Morrison, Marilyn Jo Mugler, 
Carolyn Myers, Sara Navarre, Talma Newton. Fourth row: Nadine 
Noyes, Billie Oldham, Mary Olson, Twila Oltjen, Naomi Page, Vir- 
ginia Parr, Esther Phillips, Margaret Phillips, Arlene Pierce, Ilene 
Pierce, Nina Raines, Marilyn Pat Redmond, Genevieve Reed. Third 
row: Alys Reeder, Donaleigh Rensch, Barbara Roth, Edwes Roush, 
Evelyn Rumford, Margaret Russel, Frances Russell, Grace Samuelson, 



Lois Sarver, June Schindler, Marian Sedlacek, Georganna Sells, Mar- 
jorie Shaw. Second roiv: Leanna Siler, Marilyn Joyce Smith, Helen 
Spears, Carol Sprinkel, Ruth Steiner, Celia Stickler, Norma Stocke- 
brand, Sara Stockwell, Dorothy Stover, Elaine Sutter, Mary Ann 
Swenson, Donna Swezey, Marjorie Thiessen. Bottom row: Willa 
Thompson, Olivia Tiemann, Maureen Ummel, Shirley Van Gilder, 
Phyllis Van Vliet, Carolyn Voran, Vada Walsten, Kathy Mary Wat- 
kins, Nada Weddle, Erma Whitmore, Miriam Wilke, Katherine Win- 
gert, Jean Worley. 



VAN ZILE HALL— Top row: Nancy Heliums, Mary A. Hickok, 
Rosalie Higgins, Donna Hill, Jewel Hill, Margaret Hix, Mary Hix, 
Mary Hope, Doris Hopkins, Carol Hoyt, Marian Hurst, Sara Imel. 
Third row: Ada Mae Johnston, Mildred Johnston, Lois Jones, Marilyn 
Jones, Donna Kahl, Roberta Keas, Lola Jane Keech, Joan Keeten, 
Jane Keith, Jean Kempton, Bennita Knox, LaVada Krug. Second row: 



Charlotte Lambert, Kathryn Larson, Pearl Lilliequist, Claribel Lind- 
holm, Glendeen Link, Dorothy Linn, Marjorie Jo Loomis, Ruthann 
Loomis, Beverly Loy, Mary MacCaskill, Glenys McDill, Constance 
McGinness. Bottom row: Virginia McGuire, Mary Mcllvain, Kather- 
ine McLean, Bonnie Mallory. 




163 




Waltheim Hall, 1436 Laramie, houses 78 Kansas State coeds. 



Waltheim Hall 

Q WINGING into its second year as a womens resi- 
dence hall, Waltheim operated with a capacity of 
78 women, plus a food director and social director. 
Waltheim has as its housemother, Mrs. Blanche Twiss 
and as president Bettye Jo Dick. 

Many activities and intramurals were participated in 
by the women of Waltheim Hall. Shirley Bynum was 
an attendant to the Homecoming queen. Jo Best and 
Nina Peck were two of the three attendants to the 
Royal Purple beauty queen. First prize in the Home- 
coming parade was won by the float of Waltheim and 
East Stadium. 



WALTHEIM HALL— Top row: Mrs. George R. Twiss, Margaret L. 
Austin, Mary Lou Bair, Barbara L. Barker, Mary E. Battin, Olga W. 
Bays, Mary Ann Bebermeyer, Eugenia R. Beezley, Josephine M. Best, 
Jo Ann Blackman, Phyllis J. Blecha, Kathryn J. Branan. Fifth row: 
Doris R. Bergert, Berdetta Burkhead, Ilah Burkhead, Virginia L. 
Chamberlin, Sue E. Clayton, June Cline, Myrna L. Cork, Donna D. 
Cronk, Maxine J. Cronk, Jane C. Cuer, Charlene Cusic, Elizabeth 
David. Fourth row: Willa F. Davies, LaVerne E. Dewess, Bettye Jo 
Dick, Claribel Dole, Joyce V. Ecord, Jane M. Foster, Kathleen Gee, 
Mary V. Gee, Anita Grant, Dorothy E. Hamilton, Clarice E. Ham- 
mond, Helen L. Hammond. Third row: Alice I. Harder, Kathryn D. 



Hatcher, Jeanne Hollecker, Barbara L. Holmes, Kathlyn J. Kennedy, 
Nadine Kirby, Lorraine Lacey, Melba M. Langer, Lucille Lenkner, 
Guyla E. Love, Jane A. McDonald, Elsie E. McGrew. Second row: 
Frances Moate, Mary J. Moore, Pauline Nordstrom, Nina M. Peck, 
Pauline Piersee, Iris M. Rahn, Irma Lee Ready, Norma J. Ross, 
Phyllis M. Schardein, Mary Schlagel, Marian R. Seaman, Barbara J. 
Servis. Bottom row: Joanne Steeples, Shirley S. Stiles, Gertrude A. 
Stork, Kitty J. Stratham, Helen A. Todd, Virginia I. Torkelson, 
Marian Waugh, Wilma Weyrich, Phyllis J. Wheatley, Norma K. 
White, Peggy J. Wilcox, Rosemary Wright, June A. Zibell. 




164 



A mid-winter snow finds stu- 
dents prepared and uninterested 
as they walk home to lunch across 
gleaming acres (left). The library 
and surrounding pines are freshly 
decorated by the hand of Old 
Man Winter (below). 




The kids of Campus Courts (left) 
got a thrill from the first snow, 
and came home covered with en- 
thusiasm and melting ice. 



165 




ARCADIA— Back row: Dor- 
othy Barber, Mrs. Friel, Mary 
Mellenbruch. Second row: 
Marjorie N a c e , Marjorie 
Schreiber. Front row: Betty 
Nordyke, Esther Gibson, Da- 
lena Currier. 



Independent Women Contribute to 



OCATED at 1222 Bluemont, Arcadia has been an 
organized women's independent house for five 
years. Mrs. Grace Friel is housemother and Dalena 
Currier served as president for the group this year. 

The nine women of Arcadia are active in many 
organizations. The group is a member of Amico- 
ssembly this year. Dorothy Barber is a member of the 
College band, and other members are in the Freshman 
Home Economics Club. 

Arcadia had a scavenger hunt at the house on Hal- 
lowe'en for all members and their dates. They also 
had a Christmas party, after which they exchanged 
gifts and went caroling. 

Chatterbox, located at 526 North 14th, is the home 



of seven Kansas State coeds. They have been an organ- 
ized independent women's house for six years. Frances 
Brenner was president this year. 

Each of the members of Chatterbox was honored 
with a birthday party and Mrs. Spealman, housemother 
of the group, was entertained at Thompson Tea Room 
in honor of her birthday. The girls had their annual 
Christmas dinner and gift exchange before going to 
their individual homes for the vacation. They had a 
line party in th spring for the women and their dates, 
after which they held open house at the Chatterbox. 

Chatterbox members were active in many organiza- 
tions, such as Alpha Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Omicron Nu, and the Kansas State Players. 




CHATTERBOX — Back row: 
Georgia Rose Scholl, Mrs. 
Alice Spealman, Doris Braum. 
Second row: Katherine Lewis, 
Helen Rotty, Doris Meine. 
Front row: Dolores Riley, 
Mary Rohr, Frances Brenner. 



106 



CLARK'S GABLES — Back 
row: Laverna Lenhart, Helen 
Cochran, Mary Waite. Second 
row: Dorothy McGeorge, Mrs. 
Edith Clark, Laberta Kugler, 
Thelma Stadel. Front row: 
Marjorie Bunge, Rosetta Stein- 
hoff, Bernita Skelton. 




■■ 



Campus and House Activities 



YVTITH Laberta Kugler as their president and Mrs. 
Edith Clark as housemother, the ten girls who 
call Clark's Gables their home, have had a year filled 
with activities. 

Members are active in the Collegiate 4-H Club, 
YWCA cabinet, Christian Student Fellowship, and 
the Home Economics Club. They have a student repre- 
sentative in UNESCO and are active in Theta Sigma 
Phi, Phi Alpha Mu, Kappa Phi and have been recog- 
nized by freshman Phi Kappa Phi. 

The big event of the social year was a Christmas 
dinner and party at the house, which was given for 
the girls by Mrs. Clark. The coeds took an active part 
in the Homecoming celebration by entering a float in 
the parade competition. 



Highlight of the social season at Coed Court was 
the traditional candlelight breakfast and gift exchange 
the Sunday before Christmas vacation. Following the 
breakfast, the girls, accompanied by their housemother 
Mrs. Pearl Power, attended church as a group. 

Other social functions of the house included a Christ- 
mas party at the house on December 13, for the girls 
and their dates. Thanksgiving was celebrated with a 
dinner, and Hallowe'en with a party. 

The home of 11 Kansas State women, Coed Court 
was presided over by Myrna Jean Adee. Outstanding 
among the women was Virginia Olson, who was hailed 
as Ag Barnwarmer Queen in October. Other members 
are active in 4-H and were recognized by freshman 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



COED COURT — Back row: 
Yvonne Swenson, Mary Jo 
Guerrant, Enid Keiswetter, 
Louise Paul. Second row: Mrs. 
Pearl V. Power, Jeanne 
Roach, Lucile Gilkison, Joan 
Jacobs. Front row: Myrna 
Adee, Gail Groberg, Averil 
Hawes, Virginia Olson. 




167 




CRIPPEN-INN — Back row: 
Mary Frances Weaver, Mar- 
garet Atwood, Jane Stine- 
baugh. Second row: Mrs. V. 
S. Crippen, Marguerite Jolley. 
Front row: Nancy L. Dewey, 
Nelda E. Barclay, Pat Pottorff . 



Holidays and Birthdays Festive 



44 



T) ELLES and Beaux" was the theme for a semi- 
formal Christmas party held at Crippen Inn for 
the girls and their dates. Other social functions this 
year included a weiner roast early in October, a Hal- 
lowe'en party at the house, an annual Christmas dinner 
and grab-bag and several after-hour parties. 

Small but cozy, Crippen Inn is the some of seven 
Kansas State coeds and is managed by Mrs. V. S. Crip- 
pen. Nancy Dewey, who was elected president for the 
first semester, was married at Christmas and Nelda 
Barclay took over leadership of the organization. 

Members of Crippen Inn are active in Orchesis, K- 
State Players and the Club Cervantes. 

Since 1942, when Mrs. W. H. Hills converted her 



house at 1423 Fairchild into rooms for Kansas State 
women, 2 1 coeds have annually called this their home. 

This year, with Mary Smith as their president, the 
members of Hills Heights were active in Omicron Nu, 
Who's Who, A Cappella Choir and had a member as 
secretary of the junior class. 

The coeds of Hills Heights entertained their dates 
on a hayrack ride in October and at a formal spring 
party. They celebrated Christmas with a party and 
gift exchange for the girls at the house. 

One of the larger of the women's independent organ- 
ized houses, some of the members participated in wo- 
men's sports through independently organized intra- 
mural teams. 




HILL HEIGHTS— Back row: 
Mrs. W. H. Hills, Marjorie 
Goeken, Famie Finnigin, 
Betty Pressgrove, Patricia 
Adams. Third row: Iris Reed, 
Sue Baertch, Frances Rule, 
Mary Smith, Bernita Stoeker. 
Second row: Doris Lehman, 
Bernice Lehman, Marion Law- 
yer, Lela Warner, Joyce Han- 
sen. Front row: Josephine Pix- 
ley, Marie Amerine, Mary 
Cook, Mary Lorson, Margaret 
Pixley, Miriam Dunbar. 



168 







KEIM'S KABANA — Back row: Connie Rader, Theresa Navinskey, 
Ellen Johnson, Martha Westfall, Margaret Jean Lagasse, Donna Irwin, 
Neva Jean Seiler, LaVonna Stewart. Second row: Elizabeth Hunt, 
Marjorie Roepke, Dorothy Henson, Mrs. L. Keim, Jeanie Patterson, 



Anna M. Callaghan, Verla L. Meyers, Delores Knoche. Front row: 
Merline Nutter, Glenna Baker, Donna Gies, Carol Craft, Lois Kraner, 
Georganne Fowler, Nancy Lamborn, Betty Mountain. 



Occasions for Women's Groups 



/^VPERATING with a capacity of 23 coeds, Keim's 
Kabana is in its fifth year as an independent 
women's organized house. Before the war, the same 
house was a rooming house for men students. 

Glenna Mae Baker is president this year and Mrs. L. 
R. Keim is housemother for the group. Among the 
outstanding students of Keim's Kabana are Georganne 
Fowler, treasurer of Mortar Board, and Marjorie Roep- 
ke, a member of Phi Alpha Mu. 

The highlight of the social season at Keim's Kabana 
was a Christmas party and gift exchange held at the 
house. Earlier in the fall the women and their dates 
had a picnic at Sunset Park. 



Organized in 1941 under the direction of Mrs. E. E. 
Rogers, La Fiel is the home of 24 Kansas State coeds. 
President this year is Dolores Knapp. 

Highlight of the social season at La Fiel was the 
annual Christmas formal, held in December at the 
Country Club. Birthdays of members were celebrated 
by gatherings after hours. Springtime brought picnics 
and other entertainments. 

The women of La Fiel are active in many campus 
organizations. Among them are the Purple Pepsters, 
the Service Club and the Eastern Star Club. 

Other social events included a hayrack ride for mem- 
bers and their dates early in October. 



LA FIEL — Back row: Mrs. E. E. Rogers, Gwendolyn Stratton, Donna 
Kraemer, Janice Hus. Third row: Patricia Wilcox, Maytha L. Selby, 
Carol Mudge, Naomi Fralick, Dolores Knapp, Delia Ann Fox. Second 
row: Helen Warner, Virginia Eis, Barbara Kraemer, Ruth Richards, 



Elnora M. Arensman, Laverne Tate, Anne English. Front row: Phyllis 
Birk, Clarice M. Cooper, Arlene Payne, Erma Dyck, Florene Berg, 
Doris Wilkerson, Jean Rostocil, Beth Deardorff. 




169 




MAISON-ELLE — Back row: 
Mattie Cassity, Joan Harr, Vel- 
ma Weaver, Evelyn Bowman, 
Marilyn Moomaw. Second row: 
Dorothy Bebermeyer, Mildred 
Sims, Mary Lou Thuma, Lorna 
Gore, Kathryn Robinson. Front 
row: Dorothy Wells, Jean Mc- 
Callum, Lavon Crawford, Janis 
Barstow, Jean Meade. 



Balanced Social and Scholastic 



TUTOLIDAYS received attention in the proper spirit 
at Maison-elle. Hallowe'en was observed by a 
party at the house, which was attended by the girls and 
their dates. A formal Christmas dinner was held for 
the girls at Maison-elle, which was followed by a gift 
exchange. Hearts and more hearts marked the theme 
in a Valentine house-party in the spring. 

Residents of Maison-elle, located at 1706 Laramie, 
were active in intramurals through independently or- 
ganized teams. 

The 14 girls living at Maison-elle are also members 
of such organizations as the Cosmopolitan Club, various 
home ec clubs, the College band and the 4-H club. 

Dorothy Bebermeyer served as president of the or- 
ganization and Mrs. Mattie Cassity as housemother. 



Since 1943, many Kansas State women have called 
Moore th' Merrier their home away from home. This 
year, 14 more coeds will do the same. Guiding these 
girls as housemother is Mrs. T. H. Moore and the presi- 
dent for the year is Ruth McCrerey. 

On the social side, the women entertained their 
dates with a bowling party in December. Prizes were 
awarded for both high and low scores. Christmas songs 
and mistletoe created an atmosphere of gaiety. Other 
social events included the annual Hallowe'en party, the 
Thanksgiving feast and a Christmas dinner and party. 
Moore th' Merrier is located near Aggieville at 1404 
Fairchild. Members were active in intramurals and 
other all-school activities, including home ec clubs, 
YWCA and 4-H. 




MOORE TH' MERRIER — 

Back row: Mrs. T. H. Moore, 
Harriet Hill, Dorothy Ship- 
ley, Pat Wilkinson, Mary 
Wood. Second row: Florence 
Dubbs, Betty Harding, Mar- 
garet Klema, Janey Thomas, 
Norma Heikes. Front row: 
Virginia Pinkston, Phelena 
Robinson, Orris Somers, 
Thelma Williams, Ruth Mc- 
Crerey. 



170 



PAL O'MIE— Back row: Mrs. 
Lillian B. Fuller, Wanda 
Snyder, Carrol Ramsey, Vona 
Payne. Second row: Phyllis 
Barr, Neola Springer, Vada 
Volkening, Virginia Howard. 
Front roiv: Margaret Lan- 
caster, Mary Nelson, Anne 
Breckenridge, Mickey Prather. 




Life is Aim of Organized Houses 



A YEAR filled with social events and scholastic 
u achievement is claimed by the women of Pal 
O'Mie. Thanksgiving was celebrated by a dinner at 
the house, served on the Sunday before the holiday. A 
formal party was held for the coeds and their dates 
during the Yuletide season. The annual Christmas 
breakfast and gift exchange was held the Sunday before 
the holidays. 

House meetings at Pal O'Mie are presided over by 
Neola Springer, president. Mrs. Lillian Fuller is house- 
mother for the 11 girl members. 

Among the other organizations in which Pal O'Mie 
girls are active, are Phi Alpha Mu, Alpha Delta Theta, 
Omicron Nu, Sigma Eta Chi and Prix. Several have 
been recognized by freshman Phi Kappa Phi. 



Skywood Hall is the home of 1 1 Kansas State women 
under the supervision of Mrs. Neil Swanson, house- 
mother. Darilene Hague is president of the house, 
which is located at 1719 Laramie. 

Social events at Skywood Hall were started this 
year with a Hallowe'en party which was attended by 
all members and their dates. The girls celebrated the 
holiday season with an evening dance at the Hall. 
Now a tradition for Skywood girls, all graduating 
seniors were honored with a breakfast at the Wareham 
Hotel. 

Skywood Hall members were active in both the 
home economics club and the Kansas State College 
Marching Band. One of the members was a Drum 
Majorette for the band. 



SKYWOOD HALL — Back 
row: Mrs. Neil Swanson, Dari- 
lene Hague, Helen Cazier, 
Donis Clary. Second row: 
Louise Barnes, Doris Cline, 
Ruth Tichenor, Lola Bush. 
front row: Laura Shelor, Mary 
Griffin, Esther Page, Jacque- 
line Wear. 




171 




TRAMALAI — Back row: 
Wilma Porterf ield, Anita 
Hagans, Alberta Hensel, Mil- 
dred Crow, Gloria Hall, Ar- 
dith Durnil. Second row: Jo 
Folkers, Bea Blaha, Mrs. T. H. 
Cousins, Dottie Tolson, Dor- 
een Yeoman. Front row: Doris 
Myers, Phyllis Hall, Lois Bald- 
win, Maurine Johnson, Donna 
Haag, Marilyn Buchanan. 



Promote Welfare of Members 



T) EFORE the war, Tramalai was an organized room- 
ing house for men. It was converted to house 
women when temporary dormitories were built for the 
men and the shortage of women's housing became 
acute. 

Tramalai, located at 1418 Fairchild, was the College 
home of 16 women last year. Lois Baldwin served as 
president of the group and Mrs. T. H. Cousins was 
the housemother. 

Highlighting the fall social season for Tramalai 
residents was a picnic at Sunset Park, which was at- 
tended by all members and their dates. Christmas 
dinner was a memorable occasion, followed by a gift 
swapping under the tree. 

Tramalai members belong to several campus organi- 
zations, among them the Collegiate Chapter of UNES- 
CO and the Home Ec Social Club. 

HOUSE OF WILLIAMS— Back row: Charles Armstrong, Alan Wind- 
horst, Keith Wingerd, Claude Lindsey, Jr., Robert Howley, Clyde 
Dalrymple. Second row: Thaine Larson, Harold Durst, Hurshal 



Operating with a newly organized alumni associ- 
ation, the House of Williams has become the only 
organized independent men's house at Kansas State. 

Organized to promote scholastic, social and athletic 
activities, the House of Williams stresses the promotion 
of each individual rather than the group as a whole. 

Members of the house are prominent in Sigma Tau, 
the College band, 4-H and intramurals. Members par- 
ticipated in intramural basketball, volleyball, football, 
table tennis, softball, track and horseshoes. 

The activities of the House of Williams included 
numerous social functions throughout the year. One 
of the events was an open house for the alumni at 
Homecoming. 

Mrs. Katherine Williams is housemother and Roger 
Hecht served as president. 

Boyd, Vincent Pieschl, Benn Cowan, Bernard Keating. Front row: 
Harold Snyder, Marvin Snyder, Roger Hecht, Kenneth Suiter, Ray- 
mond Keller, Hugh Foster. 




172 




Greeks play at costume parties, formals, picnics, buffet 
suppers, hayrack rides — put on the dog at teas for house- 
mothers and faculty. Dates at a Western house party are enter- 
tained by skit (top). 



4*at ^nolicd. lively 



A tea at Waltheim Hall for freshman girls was attended by 
all sorority pledges (center left). Intermission is celebrated at a 
fraternity formal by a coke (center right). A housemother's and 
faculty tea is marked by dignity and grace (lower left). 



173 



f 






"*^ 








P*r ^ "•-£-- "I 






* m 



. a 



#«^ ^/ee^ 



An early rush week brought with 
it the hottest days of the year. (Upper 
right) arriving at Van Zile, home of 
rushees. (Upper left) registration and 
that first look at sorority representatives. 
(Center) wearing black and the new 
look, rushees enter the Kappa Delt 
house on the first day of Panhellenic 
teas. (Lower left) later that night came 
the rehashing — "Which one would it 
be?" 

174 




cJfot But JlaflfLIf 



Smile till it hurts and then wait 
and wait. (Upper left) Pi Phi Bev 
Pribble entertains rushees and chap- 
ter members alike. {Upper right) 
Alpha Chi Omega hoofers enjoyed 
the skit as much as the audience. 
{Center) anxious minutes seem like 
hours with sorority actives waiting 
for bid lists in front of Van Zile. 
(Lower right) new Kappa pledges 
give with a grin as they bring bag 
and baggage "home." 



■"^" 



fyn&ti Spread Atet 



K-State fraternities spread the net for new 
members a week after the sororities. Shown 
applying the pledge pressure are (upper left) 
the Tekes with their national publication, 
(center left) bridge at the Beta's, (center right) 
the Pi K Eyes, we mean A's, and (bottom) a 
Sig Ep song session. 





<F'- ; 



|P:- 



It Jt 






u 









■ 



;vvj 




SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES TO WOMEN'S PANHELLENIC— 
Top row: Betty Bicknell, Chi Omega; Phyllis Hadley, Alpha Xi Delta; 
Maxine Keesling, Alpha Chi Omega; Deloris Montague, Alpha Delta 



Pi; Matilyn Moore, Pi Beta Phi. Bottom row: Ruth Muirhead, Kappa 
Kappa Gamma; Mary Elizabeth Mustard, Delta Delta Delta; Marion 
Terrill, Clovia; Mary Ann Weaver, Kappa Delta. 



Panhel Sponsors New Workshop Day 



TVTOMEN'S Panhellenic at Kansas State College 
launched a new program this year. They engi- 
neered many projects, assisted the administration, re- 
vised rushing rules, both for the summertime and rush 
week and held a workshop day. 

This workshop was sponsored by Panhellenic for all 
the sororities on the campus. Mrs. Ruth Schmelkin, 
Panhellenic adviser from the University of Nebraska 
at Lincoln, was guest speaker and supervisor for the 
workshop groups. Members of City Panhellenic, the 
group for town women belonging to Greek organiza- 
tions, acted as moderators. 

The afternoon was started with six officers from the 
sororities gathering together in the Lucinda Harris 
Memorial Temple to discuss their mutual problems. 
The officers which represented the groups were the 
president, house manager, rush captain, pledge trainer, 
scholarship chairman and social chairman. Later in the 
afternoon, after the workshops had met, all members 
of the sororities congregated in the auditorium to listen 
to a summary of the values of the workshops. At this 



time, Mrs. Schmelkin talked to the women concerning 
new trends in fraternity programs, the Panhellenic 
spirit, and what she thought had been gained in the 
workshops. 

Women's Panhellenic is composed of a junior and 
senior representative from each sorority. It is their 
constant effort to strengthen the Panhellenic feeling 
among all Greek organizations, as well as among fra- 
ternity members and non-members. These women act 
as the governing body of all sororities. 

Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic sponsor 
Interfraternity Sing, a song contest held each spring 
with all sororities and fraternities competing for top 
honors. Winners of the trophies in 1947 were Kappa 
Kappa Gamma and Beta Theta Pi. 

One of the projects undertaken by the group was 
the support of a child in one of the countries of 
Europe. 

Mary Alice Wolf, Delta Delta Delta, was president 
of the group for the past year, and Miss Dorothy Hamer, 
Assistant Dean of Women acted as Panhellenic adviser. 



177 




ALPHA CHI OMEGA SORORITY— Top row: Mrs. Cleo Hardy, 
Janice Addington, Rosemary Barr, Janis Barstow, Janice Bayles, Fran- 
ces Callahan, Juanita Cooper, Lesley Denison, Virginia Dibbens. 
Third row: Patricia Dishner, Joanne Gamlowski, Shirley Gibbs, Rose- 
mary Grosdidier, Patricia Hale, Norma Joy Hartman, Irene Henning- 



son, Maxine Keesling, Wanda Knight. Second row: Lillian Lacy, 
Marjorie Landeau, Edith Levedahl, Sally Martin, Margaret MacGregor, 
Jane McDonald, Martha Miller, Louise Miller, Marilyn Mills. Bottom 
row: Eileen Ralston, Yvonne Swenson, Eva Ward, Betty Lou Williams, 
Joanne Wolgast, Delores Wright, Beth Wyse. 



Alpha Chi Omega 



Founded in 1885 at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana 

Seventy-one chapters 
President: Wanda Knight 

THE ALPHA CHI house is at 615 North Delaware. 



Gamma Zeta Chapter established 1947 





The Alpha Chi's: 

Made a good start with a beautiful new house . . . 

Have enough pledges to send actives to library . . . 

Prefer Seven-Up . . . 

Are active with members in Phi Alpha Mu, Kansas 
State Players and Purple Pepsters . . . 

Sing "I'll Dance at Your Wedding" as their theme song . 

Keep the Sig Ep's from making their grades . . . 

Danced at a formal Christmas party at the house . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— riding pogo sticks to school. 



178 




ALPHA DELTA PI — Top row: Mrs. Ransom Stephens, Phyllis Art- 
man, Beverly Babb, Martha Barlow, Alice Becker, Nancy Berry, Helen 
Brotherson, Gloria Buckles, Mary A. Burgwin, Phyllis Burns, Marilyn 
Bush. Fourth row: Barbara Carttar, Donna Chance, Maxine Childers, 
Sara Crouch, Donna Davenport, Sharon Eyestone, Phyllis Fine, Doro- 
thy Gifford, Lorraine Halbower, Alice Hammeke. Third row: Laura- 
nell Hawkinson, Helen Howell, Marjorie Imler, Jo Ann Jeffries, 



Georgeanne Jenkins, Margaret Jett, Rebecca Lamoreaux, Marilyn 
Larrick, Betty Malone, Ruthetta Maxwell. Second row: Jeanne Miller, 
Marjorie Mitchell, Deloris Montague, Lois Morgan, Gloria Nanninga, 
Jean Neal, Ilavere Oldfield, Jean Pratt, Joyce Pratt, Cyrilka Rose- 
berry, Beverly Rubick. Bottom row: Sigrid Schjerven, Audrey Schmitt, 
Ellen Smith, Shirley Smith, Suzanne Swarner, Esther Van Buskirk, 
Patricia White, Rebecca Wilkinson, Joan Yearwood. 



Alpha Delta Pi 




Founded 1851 at Macon, Georgia 



The A D Pi's: 

Had Ag Barnwarmer Princess . . . 

Were some of the lucky few to get into Y-Orpheum . . . 

Wanted first, would have settled for second, but 

got third in scholarship . . . 

Should build an extension on their side porch . . . 

Wish they had a BB gun to break the Phi Delt 

binoculars . . . 

Had a hayrack ride on Hallowe'en . . . Hey Hey! . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— Insisting on going dutch 

on dates. 

179. 



Alpha Eta chapter established 1915 
Sixty-nine chapters 
President: Mary Ann Burgwin 

THE ALPHA DELTA PI chapter is located at 518 Sunset. 





ALPHA XI DELTA— Top row: Mrs. A. W. Langstrom, Martha 
Adams, Dorothy Adell, Madeline Asher, Ruth Bauersfeld, Joann 
Blackwelder, Helen Boatright, Dorothy Cossell, Ruth Dailey, Mona 
Dishman. Fourth row: Charlotte Dorf, Jacqueline Fayette, Lois Folck, 
Kathryn Fryer, Virginia Furlong, Edna GiJmore, JoAnn Goss, Doris 
Granger, Vera Green, Joan Griffith. Third row: Phyllis Hadley, 
Frances Hardy, Rilla Harris, Martha Henre, Joanne Kastrup, Karen 



Kennedy, Virginia Kornemann, Norma Lumpkin, Darlene Lygrisse, 
Jo Ellen McNicholas. Second row: Patricia McVey, Arlene Mastin, 
Thelma Moore, Ann Neff, Harriette Otwell, Louise Palmer, Caroline 
Perkins, Elizabeth Perkins, Mary Roach, Dorothy Selfridge. Bottom 
row: Virginia Shrake, Thelma Stous, Jo Anne Stroup, Mary Lou Tutt, 
Jean Vogt, Beatryse Vyff, Barbara Williamson, Gloria Witt, Norva 
Wolfe. 



Alpha Xi Delta 



Founded in 1893 at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois 

Fifty-nine chapters 

President First Semester: Arlene Mastin 

Second Semester: Phyllis Hadley 



Alpha Kappa Chapter established in 1922 




ALPHA XI DELTA women live at 601 N. Delaware 




The Alpha Xi's: 

Used "Christmas Toyland" as the theme for their 
winter formal . . . 

Deny that a rose by any other name would smell so 
sweet . . . 

Think they are women of the world because of their 
vital interest in UNESCO . . . 

Were proud of having an active that attended the 
Youth Festival at Prague, Czechoslovakia . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— Turning out in mass 
for the love and marriage series. 

180 




CHI OMEGA SORORITY— Top row: Mrs. P. J. Groody, June Alefs, 
Joan Amstutz, Patricia Beck, Joan Beggs, Barbara Berger, Betty Bick- 
nell, Marilyn Bryan, Shirley Bynum, Joyce Darling. Fourth row: 
Jeannette Doran, Joan Dykeman, Joanne Egan, Virginia Epp, Phyllis 
Evans, Martha Frye, Ruth Gilek, Kathleen Gossett, Mildred Hall, 
Jeanne Hanly. Third row: Mary Henson, Jean Howell, Mary Jenkins, 
Norma Jones, Barbara King, Lyal Laughinghouse, Sue Ann Long, 



Katherine Lowell, Carolyn McNabney, Orpha Masters. Second roiv: 
Cynthia Morrish, Jane Norris, Marjorie Oliver, Terrill Orr, Lucy 
Reardon, Mary Riley, Natalie Schmitz, Jean Smith, Shirley Smith. 
Bottom row: Mary Staley, Leigh Straight, Shirley Taff, Rebecca Tice, 
Milruth Unruh, Donna Weixelman, Beryl Wesche, Ruth Westvold, 
Jan Willard, Peggy Willis. 




Chi Omega 



Founded 1895 at Fayetleville, Arkansas Kappa Alpha Chapter established 1915 

One hundred chapters 

President First Semester: Mildred Hall 

Second Semester: Jane Willard 



The Chi O's: 

Point with pride to their own ideas of beautiful 
women . . . 

Have representatives on Mortar Board, Student Council, 
Who's Who . . . 

Have clean minds because they change them so 
often . . . 

Finally have permission from Mother to smoke . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— never taking blind dates 
— they're all engaged or going steady. 

181 



THE CHI OMEGA chapter house is located at 1808 Laramie. 

■ 





Founded at Kansas State College in 1931 



Clovia 



Two chapters 
President: Virginia Grandfield 




Alpha Chapter established in 1931 




THE CLOVIA CHAPTER HOUSE is located at 303 North Sixteenth 



The Clovias: 

Sing "I'm Looking Over a 4-H Clover" as their theme 

song . . . 

Hold honors in basketball, folk and tap dancing 

intramurals . . . 

Carried out a "Crystal Ball' theme in their annual 

winter formal . . . 

Have active members in Omicron Nu and Mortar 

Board . . . 

Must pass both Acacia's and TKE's on their wa to and 

from school . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— sowing orange blossoms 

instead of oats. 



CLOVIA — Top row: Mrs. George Farmer, Lois Billington, Betty 
Boutwell, Betty Butler, Betty Byerly, Mary Byler, Kathleen Carey, 
Janice Carnahan, Kate Clark. Third row: Sarah Cook, Helen Cool, 
Willis Cross, Ruby Dickey, Virginia Grandfield, Enas Hansen, Edna 
Hartman, Carol Herrick, Marcia Ingenthron. Second row: Ruth Kel- 



ling, Norma Koon, Barbara McCoid, Elizabeth Mayall, Vesta Miller, 
Willa Mills, Clara Montgomery, Louise Mosier, Marguerite Nebergall. 
Bottom row: Mary Noble, Virginia Sedgwick, Helen Stricklin, Loreta 
Stricklin, Marion Terrill, Betty Warren, Jeanne Warren. 




182 




DELTA DELTA DELTA— Top row: Mrs. Edward Shafer, Joan Arga- 
bright, Rolla Blood, Marilyn Boice, Barbara Bross, Barbara Clark, 
Mary Collister, Margery Dunne, Marjorie Elliott, Edwina Frick. Fourth 
row: Barbara Garver, Jerry Gatz, Betty Gish, Phyllis Greenough, 
Georgi Gress, Jean Hagans, Edna Hammond, Nancy Hanlon, Carolyn 
Hinds, Corrine Holm. Third row: Arvilla Johnson, Betty Krehbiel, 
Marilyn Larson, Jeanne Laughlin, Patricia Laughlin, Jayne Lawson, 



Shirley Lea, Monita McNeill, Doris Marshall, Nannette Martin. Second 
row: Phyllis Martin, Patricia Moll, Mary Mustard, Nancy Neely, Patty 
Nichols, Dorothy Paramore, Judith Peck, Sallie Peterson, Margaret 
Reinhardt, Betty Rich. Bottom row: Margaret Ricklefs, Jacquelin 
Rogers, Marian Skaggs, Jocelyn Swartz, Billie Tobias, Ann Ulricksen, 
Marlys Wain, Molly Weathers, Patricia Wentworth, Mary Wolf. 




Delta Delta Delta 



Founded 1888 at Boston University 



Ninety chapters 

President First Semester: Betty Rich 

Second Semester: Mary Alice Wolf 



Theta Iota Chapter established 1915 



The Tri Delt's: 

Would rather dance than talk . . . 

Try to use three, not four, Delta's when answering 

the telephone . . . 

Boast of several outstanding activity leaders . . . 

Have "My Adobe Hacienda" as a theme song . . . 

Marvel at their blond and beautiful attendant to 

the Royal Purple Beauty Queen . . . 

Were in a "Little Bit of Heaven" at their formal . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— devoting every weekend 

to study. 



THE TRI DELT Chapter House is located at 1934 Laramie. 




183 





KAPPA DELTA- — Top row: Mrs. Frederick Consigny, Arlene Abelson, 
Barbara J. Baker, Patricia Baker, Joan A. Bennett, Jeanne Bradshaw, 
Dolores Campbell, Betty Coady, Antoinette Darby. Third row: Alice 
Dawson, Anne Dean, Jean Douglas, Dorothy Eggerman, Norma J. 
Evans, Katherine Gatz, Joan Henry, Carol Ilsley, Emma Jones, Betty 



Kelly, Barbara Kinsey. Second row: Marceline A. Klein, Barbara 
Lewis, Anita Lyness, Darlene Meisner, Margery Mitchell, Ruby Mor- 
gan, Helen Morton, LaVerne Robert, Mary H. Rood, Virginia Schmidt. 
Bottom row: Mary Totten, Norma Van Dorn, Mary A. Weaver, 
Maxine Wells. 



Kappa Delta 



Founded 1897 at Virginia State Normal. Farmville, Va. 



Sigma Gamma Chapter established 1920 



Seventy-two chapters 

President First Semester: Virginia Schmidt 

Second Semester: Arlene Ableson 




THE KAPPA DELTA chapter house is located at 1716 Fairchild 




The Kappa Delts: 

Celebrated their fiftieth anniversary with tea and 

dinner at the Country Club . . . 

Are out of range of fraternity field glasses 

by their location . . . 

Won the Progressive Award for the most improved 

Kappa Delta chaper . . . 

Participated in intramurals . . . 

Have members active in Home Economics Club, 

Freshmen Counseling, and A Cappella Choir . . . 

Got into the act by pledging the winner of the 

Princess Prom . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— putting all their rings on 

the right hand before going on a date. 



184 



The Kappa's: 

Are still trying to win the scholarship — never say 

die . . . 

Will consider themselves lucky to have three or 

four back for rush week . . . 

Turn out porch lights five minutes early . . . 

Are represented with members as cheer leaders, Mortar 

Board and editor of Royal Purple . . . 

Were crushed because they didn't get in Y-Orpheum . . . 
PLAY HARD TO GET BY— never answering the 
phone . . . 




THE KAPPA'S are in residence at 517 North Delaware. 




Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Founded 1870 at Monmouth, Illinois 



Gamma Alpha Chapter established 1916 



Eighty-one chapters 

President First Semester: Virginia Gingrich 

Second Semester: Phyllis Lou Johnson 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA SORORITY— Top row: Mrs. Eura Hard- 
ing, Barbara Baker, Prudence Bennett, Frances Bradley, Mary Bradley, 
Kathryn Brainard, Olive Brainard, Virginia Bryan, Mary Cather, Doris 
Collins, Mary Frances Cooney, Betty Crawford. Fourth row: Patricia 
Davis, Elizabeth Drake, Marilyn Evans, Amy Lou Fearl, Jane Fenton, 
Mary Lou Ford, Nancy Frey, Constance Frizzell, Mary Gerlach, Vir- 
ginia Gingrich, Susie Green, Gwen Grove. Third row: Jane Halbower, 
Mary Lou Harwood, Carol Jean Heter, Shirley Hill, Jo Harriet Hofsess, 



Nancy Hunt, Mary Frances Jennings, Frances Jewett, Georgia Johnson, 
Phyllis Lou Johnson, Gwyn Kimbell, Emelie Kirk. Second row: Mary 
Ann Leonard, Susan Lovell, Ardeth Maupin, Eleanor Morgan, Ruth 
Muirhead, Patricia Nelson, Betty Peckham, Majol Pollom, Mary Regan, 
Lucy Robinson. Bottom row: Jean Rugan, Nira Scarborough, Nanette 
Soper, Ann Thackrey, Beatrice Tuggle, Barbara Vest, Patty Sue War- 
nick, Carolyn Weiss, Mary Ellen Whitney, Nancy Wilcox. 




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185 



Pi Beta Phi 



Founded 1867 at Monmouth, Illinois 



Ninet-two chapters 

President: First Semester: Ann Huddleston 

Second Semester: Nadine Smith 



Kansas Beta Chapter established 1915 





THE PI BETA PHI chapter house is located at 505 Denison. 

PI BETA PHI SORORITY— Top row: Mrs. R. W. Torrey, Patricia 
Adams, Constance Armitage, JoAnn Badley, Shirley Barham, Carol 
Bates, Martha Beckman, Carol Blecha, Doris Brewer, Joanne Brewer, 
Carol Campbell, Irva Carver. Fifth row. Cecile Cary, Leta Christie, 
Nancy Diggle, Mildred Duwe, Barbara Flora, Joan Frank, Pauline 
Fredrickson, Carolyn Glover, June Graff, Peggy Grentner, Mary Jo 
Griffith, Barbara Hamilton. Fourth row: Lillian Hansen, Jeannette 
Hargis, Beverly Hayes, Betty Hinkhouse, Jean Holmgren, Elaine 



The Pi Phi's: 

Keep that scholarship cup shiny . . . 

Picked the logical, luscious girl for Homecoming 

Queen . . . 

Know their legacies will keep them strong . . . 

Love to wear sleek hair-do's . . . 

Feel very philanthropic about their settlement 

school project . . . 

PLAY HARD TO GET BY— Never having more than 

two dates in one evening. 



Howenstine, Ann Huddleston, Norma Huddleston, Barbara Kellogg, 
Barbara King, Shirley King, Sue Law. Third row: Patricia McCrary, 
Ann McMillen, Catherine Merrill, Marilyn Moore, Nancy Munger, 
Joan Myers, Norma Lou Myers, Mary Neeley, Joline Nelson, Joan 
Newcomer, Shirley Nichols, Betty O'Neal. Second row: Joanne Orr, 
Shirley Pence, Mona Peterson, Maryellen Phililps, Patty Piffer, Evelyn 
Platner, Beverly Pribble, Anne Russell, Nancy Schoonover, Mary 
Schovee, Nadine Smith, June Sorenson. Bottom row: Thelma Sted- 
ham, Betsy Steinstra, Helen Wilkie, Betty Wilson, Gwen Wilson, Joan 
Woodward, Mary Zink. 




186 






Kfatfr* 





INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL— Top row: Earl Beaver, Acacia; 
Alan Berndt, Alpha Tau Omega; Arthur Cotts, Kappa Sigma; James 
Davis, Delta Tau Delta; Casey Edell, Tau Kappa Epsilon; Gerald 
Gutzman, Lambda Chi Alpha; Robert Heckler, Sigma Nu; Joe Hodg- 
son, Theta Xi; Claude Howard, Phi Delta Theta; Donald E. Jackson, 



Kappa Alpha Psi. Bottom row: Paul Jorgenson, Sigma Phi Epsilon; 
Rex Kruse, Delta Sigma Phi; Edward McGinness, Farmhouse; Louis 
Otto, Beta Theta Pi; Robert Reed, Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Dan 
Russell, Alpha Gamma Rho; Merrill Toburen, Alpha Kappa Lambda; 
Charles Wempe, Phi Kappa; Ken Winterscheidt, Pi Kappa Alpha. 



Frat Councils Add New Members 



/^\NE of the first acts of the Interfraternity Council 
was to ban the giving of corsages by fraternity 
men. The long-discussed problem of hour dances and 
their relative success was again taken into consideration, 
and the system was re-organized. 

Delta Sigma Phi was admitted into full membership, 
with Kappa Alpha Psi an honorary member, and 
Lambda Chi Alpha retaining probationary membership. 
The Council met twice monthly alternating among 



the fraternity houses. Each group sent one represen- 
tative. Claude Howard, Phi Delta Theta, head the 
organization, and Dr. V. D. Foltz was faculty sponsor. 
Project of the Interfraternity Pledge Council the 
past year was the IPC Ball, held February 6 at the 
Avalon. The purpose of the IPC is to cement friendli- 
ness among the fraternity and sorority pledges. Jim Mc- 
Causland, Delta Tau Delta, acted as president this year 
and Miss Golda Crawford was faculty sponsor. 



INTERFRATERNITY PLEDGE COUNCIL— Top row: Joe Adams, 
Alpha Kappa Lambda; Connie Armitage, Pi Beta Phi; Rosemary Barr, 
Alpha Chi Omega; Orion Beaver, Acacia; Rodney Breneman, Phi 
Delta Theta; Glenn Channell, Beta Theta Pi; Samuel Claar, Alpha 
Gamma Rho; Robert Daly, Tau Kappa Epsilon; Anne Dean, Kappa 
Delta; Wilbur Gaughan, Phi Kappa. Second row: Vera Green, Alpha 
Xi Delta; Robert Hatcher, Pi Kappa Alpha; Harry Hixon, Sigma 



Alpha Epsilon; Robert Knight, Sigma Nu; Daavid Livers, Theta Xi; 
James McCausland, Delta Tau Delta; Marguerite Nebergall, Clovia; 
George Nelson, Sigma Phi Epsilon; Patricia Nelson, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; Terrell Orr, Chi Omega. Bottom row: William Parker, 
Farmhouse; Jack Ranck, Delta Sigma Phi; Loren Riley, Kappa Sigma; 
Ronald Stinson, Alpha Tau Omega; Ann Ulricksen, Delta Delta Delta; 
Joan Yearwood, Alpha Delta Pi. 




187 








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ACACIA FRATERNITY— Top ro^: Mrs. Ella Lyles, Ralph Adams, 
Dean Akins, Rex Archer, Gerald Auerbach, Earl Beaver, Orion 
Beaver, Fred Borck, James Brady, Donald Brown, Milton Clemens. 
Fourth roiv: Rex Clemens, William Crouch, Edwin Denman, John 
Ellison, Glen Frakes, Leslie Golden, Robert Grandle, Charles Hall, 
John Hart, Lyle Hart, William Hart. Third row: Wesley Holmes, 
Robert Homier, Gilbert Jeffery, Kresten Jensen, Allen Jett, John 



Jordan, Keemit Kors, Robert Kysar, Dean Lovendahl, Frank Mac- 
Creary, Kyle Moran. Second roiv: Joe Nathan, William Neal, Willard 
Obley, Frank Peycke, David Prickett, George Robinson, Wayne 
Sanders, Wendell Simonton, Donald Stamback, John Stohr, William 
Sturdevant. Bottom row: Ervin Syfert, Clifford Ukele, Kenneth Wal- 
den, Everett Waudby, Henry Wilson, Howard Wood, Leonard Wood, 
John Wright, David Wylie. 



Acacia 



Founded 1904 at the University of Michigan 



Kansas State Chapter established 1913 



Twenty-seven chapters 

President First Semester: Charles Hall 

Second Semester: Bill Sturdevant 




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THE ACACIA'S live at 340 North Sixteenth. 




The Acacia's: 

Have the Governor and several of the faculty as honorary members . . 

Were crestfallen because only nine of 20 pledges made their grades . . 

Are proud to have members in Steel Ring, Sigma Tau, and on 

the Student Council . . . 

Beat the Delts in football by the impossible score of 5 to . . . 

Specialize in waiting for Clovia's to slink past . . . 

Are eagerly anticipating a new house for their grandchildren . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — forgetting that all parties, even Indian ones, 
end at midnight. 

188 




Alpha Gamma Rho 



Founded in 1908 at Indianapolis, Indiana 



Alpha Zeta ohapler established in 1926 



Thirty-five chapters 
President: Dennis Goetsch 



The AGR's: 

Are the only men who boast a car per-capita . . . 
Still wonder how they won the first award for 
Homecoming decoraions . . . 

Placed a man for F.M.O.C. . . . 

Are about to form their own political party . . . 

Have the distinction of being the only ones who have 
a vegetable garden instead of grass for a lawn . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — practicing hog-calling in sorority 
living rooms. 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO FRATERNITY— Top row: Mrs. Olive Kip- 
fer, Harold Black, William Bracken, Don Brown, Robert Brown, 
Harry Brownlee, Harold Callahan, Richard Chase, Samuel Claar, 
James Collier, John Crofoot. Fourth row: Bobby Crowley, Joseph 
Curry, Paul Doby, Boyce Dougherty, Ray Doyen, Edwin Draney, 
William Edwards, Thomas Evans, Marvin Fansher, Donald Flentie, 
Douglas George. Third row: Dennis Goetsch, John Good, Dean 
Haddock, Glen Harbert, Samuel Harris, Wilbur Hess, Herbert Hos- 




THE AGR CHAPTER HOUSE is located at 421 North Sixteenth. 



kins, Edwin Kay, Donald Keast, Glenn Keast, Wayne Keast. Second 
roiv: James Kirkeminde, Virgil Lair, Donald Lawrence, Glenn Mc- 
Cormick, Philip McDonald, Billy Mitchelson, Harold Price, Hal 
Ramsbottom, Glenn Rea, Ned Rokey. Bottom row: Dan Russell, 
Jack Savage, David Schirmer, Duane Schirmer, Kenneth Scott, Lyle 
Snider, Wallace Terrill, Ralph Utermoehlen, Robert Warren, Roscoe 
Willoughby, Richard Winger, James Wood. 










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189 




ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDAS live at 413 N. 17th 



The A.K.L.'s: 

Achieved fame with their barber shop quartet . . . 

Placed second man in the FMOC race because he has 
such a common name . . . 

Celebrated Christmas with a dinner at the Wareham, 
followed by a dance at the house . . . 

Think every day is Friday and govern themselves 
accordingly . . . 

Welcomed the coming of spring with a formal dance . . . 
Specialize in intramurals . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — quoting old Spanish books. 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 



Founded in 1914 at the University of California 

Ten chapters 
President: Warren Toburen 



Iota Chapter established in 1930 




ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA FRATERNITY— Top row: Mrs. Helen 
McCarrol, Henry Adams, Rodney Beaver, Jerry Brooks, Willis Buehler, 
Frederick Butcher, Leland Clark, Herbert Combs, Harold Eagleton, 
John Elam. Third row. Norman Ernst, Alan Fryer, William Goodbar, 
James Hendricks, John Kohn, Dean Kordes, Wayne Lander, Stanley 
Lindgren, John McBride, Ralph McCurdy. Second row. Joseph 



Maloney, Dale Meyers, Duane Miller, Robert Miller, Frank Moots, 
Jack Moody, Clyde Parsons, Herman Patterson, George Smith, Hubert 
Smith. Bottom row: David Smoot, Donald Stafford, Robert Stark; 
Fred Tate, Merril Toburen, Warren Toburen, Page Twiss, Edward 
Vargon, Robert Wissing, Kay Wortman, Robert Yarnell. 




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ALPHA TAU OMEGA — Top rowv Mrs. Fred Coulson, George Adams, Kiser, Harold Kiser, Henry Kite, Alphia Knapp. Second row: Richard 

Jr., Herbert Asher, Kenneth Bell, Robert Bensing, Alan Berndt, Robert Krizman, Carl Lemon, David Lewis, Harold Lukens, Arthur March, 

Berndt, Virgil Bodine, Don Borthwick, Jack Brown. Fourth row: Vernon Minor, John Money, Glen Scanlan, Charles Sherlock, Kent 

Eugene Bruner, Paul Degenhardt, Charles Denison, Harold Duby, Slyhoff. Bottom row: John Stanley, Don Uppendahl, James Wildman, 

Charles Engelland, Ralph Fredrickson, Ralph Fuhrken, Francis Gwin, Alton Wilson, Royal Wilson, Stanford Wise, J. B. Wohlberg, Ray 

Paul Gwin, Roy Gwin. Third row: Clarence Heath, George Holloway, Yelley. 
George Jones, Keith Kehmeier, Paul Kelly, Lawrence King, Corliss 

Alpha Tau Omega 

Founded 1865 at Richmond, Virginia Delia Theta Chapter established 1920 

One hundred and one Chapters 
President: J. B. Wohlberg 




1730 CLAFLIN ROAD is the new home of ATO. 



The ATO's: 

Have members prominent in Blue Key, Pi Tau Sigma 

and Y.M.C.A. . . . 

Wish rural routes had modern conveniences . . . 

Try to sleep listening to more than 500 children in 

the veteran's housing across the road . . . 

Can't seem to figure out who's car belongs to who . . . 

Never heard of assemblies . . . 

Gave a superb White Tea Rose Formal . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Tipping their halo's to every 

girl they meet. 







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BETA THETA PI— Top row: Mrs. Velma Whipple, Willis Adams, 
Terry Ayers, Duane Babcock, William Baetz, George Bascom, Robert 
Batt, Clifford Batten, Jack Bell, Louis Bender, Jr., Robert Bisagno, 
William Bond, Joseph Brady, William Brownlee, Stanley Burchfiel. 
Fifth row: John Busenbark, Don Buster, William Cannon, Glenn 
Channell, Harris Clark, Joseph Cleavinger, Alan Cobb, Richard Col- 
ins, Robert Cowdery, Robert Dahl, Louis DeBord, Jack Dunne, 
William Eidson, Wayne Engelhardt, Franklin Fenton. Fourth row: 
Russell Frey, Richard Fuller, John Gatz, Willard Geiger, Howard 
Gillespie, Norville Gish, Charles Green, Elton Green, Blair Hackney, 
Charles Halbower, Dale Harkins, Richard Harman, Stuart Hartman, 



Richard Harrwell, Jr. Third row: Kimber Heddens, Joe Henderson, 
Joe Henderson, Gordon Herr, Vernon Hoover, Allan Keeth, James 
Kilkenny, Ross Laybourn, Ronald Linscheid, Gene Lovett, Harry 
McGrath, Paul Marshall, Stanley Mellor, Charles Miller, Albert Mor- 
gan, Edward Morgan. Second row: Glenn Munger, Michael Myers, 
John Oswald, Louis Otto, Manford Peck, III, Royce Pence, Richard 
Petro, Robert Petro, Fred Pierce, Wendell Pollock, Ernest Ptacek, 
William Richards, Ralph Ricklefs, William Santoro, Winston Schmidt. 
Bottom roiv: Mert Schwensen, Donald Setter, George Sherman, Rahn 
Smiley, Donald Tarver, Richard Templeton, Dan Upson, Glenn Utt, 
Charles Walker, Trevor Watson, Clyde Wilson. 



Beta Theta Pi 



Founded in 1839 at Miami University Gamma Epsilon Chapter, established in 1914 

Ninety-two Chapters 

President: First Semester: Winston A. Schmidt 

Second Semester: Charles Green 




THE BETA'S live at 500 Sunset 




The Beta's: 

Came out minus the pig at the "Beta Pig" . . . 
Know that no one can hold a candle to their sere- 
nades . . . 

Won Interfraternity Sing, and the Marching Song 
gets prettier every year . . . 

Have members in Blue Key, K. Fraternity and numer- 
ous other organizations . . . 

Are proud of their high point man on the K-State 
Basketball team . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — extensive pledge training. 

192 





Delta Tau Delta 



Founded at Bethany College, West Virginia 

Seventy-six Chapters 

President First Semester: Jack Rieb 

Second Semester: James Davis 



Gamma Chi Chapter established 1919 



The Belt's: 

Took first place in golf intramurals . . . 

Hold honors with actives as treasurer of Student 

Council, Vice president of Steel Ring and Sigma 

Tau . . . 

Had too many engineers with their fingers 

in the pie for their Homecoming decorations . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Hunting for girls that have never 

had a date with another Delt. 



DELTA TAU DELTA— Top row: Mrs. Brickhouse Wilson, Donald 
Allen, Keith Askins, Leonard Banowetz, Fred Barrett, Derrill Bartley, 
James Beckett, Leland Bell, Robert Bell, Loren Blaser, Boyd Boner, 
Bill Bradley. Fifth row: Robert Bradley, Charles Braunagel, John 
Browne, Don Cossman, Fred Cossman, Horace Crow, James Davis, 
Donald Dickerson, George Douglass, Fredrick Ernst, Robert Feldner, 
Richard Finegan. Fourth row: Robert Fletcher, Jacob Fortenberry, Carl 
Grieshaber, William Grittman, Peter Hampton, Jay Honeywell, Rich- 
ard Johnson, David Kays, David Keith, Ward Keller, Robert Long, 
James Loyd. Third row: James McCausland, Carroll McNay, Amos 
McVeigh, Willis Mack, Richard Martin, Don Matlack, Harry Merri- 




THE DELTA TAU DELTA house is located at 1224 Fremont. 

man, Richard Merriman, Harold Milner, Kenneth Morrison, Richard 
Morse, Robert Oberhelman. Second row: Roy Oswald, J. M. Rexroad, 
Jack Rieb, Sidney Rieb, John Rieg, Richard Schmitz, Ernest Sellers, 
Kenneth Sellers, Richard Sheets, Raymond Smith, Robert Streeter, 
Charles Vaughan. Bottom row: David Ward, Bernard Williams, David 
Wilson, Ramon Wood, Jack Woodard, Joe Young. 






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193 




DELTA SIGMA PHI— Top row: Gerald Abbott, Charles Averill, Ross 
Blair, Homer Baker, Gailand Bartltt, Hayes Beck, William Bisbee, 
Bowen Brady, Richard Caffrey, George Godfrey. Third row: George 
Hoferer, Phillip Hurd, Arlie Jackson, Paul S. Johnson, Robert Keener, 
Glenn Keeton, Carl Keller, Loren Kolste, Rex Kruse, Don Look. 



Second row: Howard McCune, Melville Marnix, Paul Mohn, Carl 
Morgan, Forrest Musson, Jack Pohlman, Joe Pohlman, Russell Porter- 
field, Jack Ranck, Robert Redmond. Bottom row: Warren Rexroad, 
Jimmie Robb, Donald Sheats, Lester Shriver, John Thatcher, Mason 
Tucker, Kenneth Walker, Lafe Williams, Russell Youmans. 



Delta Sigma Phi 



Founded 1899 at City College of New York 



Alpha Upsilon chapter founded 1924 



Forty-three chapters 

President First Semester: Russell Porterfield 

Second Semester: Joe Pohlman 




THE DELTA SIGMA PHI house is located at 1648 Fairchild 




The Delta Sigs: 

Hurried reactivation to be ready for the fall semester . . . 
Advertised for new members through the classified 
section of the Collegian . . . 

Participated in varied intramural athletics . . . 

Have members active in A Capella Choir, Agricultural 

Economics Club, and Collegiate 4-H . . . 

Have neon sign, the biggest on the hill, in front of 

their house . . . rushees please note . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Having a multitude of windows- 

and no shades. 



194 




Farm House 



Founded in 1905 at University of Missouri 



Kansas Chapter established 1921 



Eight Chapters 

President First Semester: Howard W. Borcharilt 

Second Semester: Stan Fansher 



Farm House: 

Has members active in Alpha Zeta, Blue Key and 

4-H . . . 

Holds the distinction of being the only fraternity house 

without a lawn . . . 

Keep themselves warm with the midnight oil they 

burn . . . 

Think the scholarship cup is the only one they need . . . 

Are family men always setting aside days for having 

mothers and sisters to dinner . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — the famous Farm House hayrack 

rides. 

FARM HOUSE — Top row-' Mrs. E. L. Taylor, John Aiken, Harry Ains- 
lie, Byron Albers, Bennie Bird, Howard Borchardt, Quentin Carnahan, 
Norman Collins, Melvin Cotner, Lester Crandall. Fourth row: Harold 
Dalbom, Max Deets, James Esslinger, Stanley Fansher, Dale Gillan, 
Charles Glenn, Jack Graham, Donald Hopkins, Clifford Houghton, 
Merle Howes. Third row: George Krause, Donald Larsen, Howard 
Lindholm, Edward McGinness, Robert Mason, Thomas Means, Harry 




FARM HOUSE men live at 1409 Fairchild. 

Mudge, Jr., Frank Overley, Clair Parcel, Bill Parker. Second row: 
Harold Ramsey, Charles Reese, Dean Reese, Billie Reid, Duane 
Riffel, Floyd Rolf, Philip Sanders, Dean Schowengerdt, Garrett Seaton, 
William Smies. Bottom row: Robert Stoltenberg, Eugene Swenson, 
Richard Thuma, Floyd Ward, Robert Ward, Dale Watson, Roger 
Wilk, Roger Wilkowske, Lloyd Wiseman. 








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195 



Kappa Alpha Psi 



Founded in 1911 at University of Indiana 



Beta Psi Chapter established in 1947 



Sixty-four chapters 



President: Samuel A. Jolly 



The K.A.P.'s: 

Are the first colored fraternity on the Campus . . . 
Played Santa to Douglas School children here . . . 
Turned out en mass at frequent K.A.P. dances staged 
in the Douglas Community Center . . . 



Have members active in Phi Lambda Upsilon, 
A. I. Ch. E., Cosmopolitan Club and Halo Club . 
Sport mustaches — almost to a man . . . 
Were active in intramurals . . . 
MAKE LOVE BY — Dressing immaculately. 



KAPPA ALPHA PSI— Top row: D. J. Albritten, James Alex- 
ander, Leslie Billingsley, James Crockett, Leonard Goodloe, Curtiss 
Gray, Ira Hutchison, Andrew Jackson. Third row: Donald Jack- 
son, Nathan Johnson, Vernell Johnson, Samuel Jolly, Wallace 
Kidd, Frank Levell, Charles Lewis, U. G. Mathews. Second row: 



James Motin, Jackie Papin, Alfonso Reynolds, Charles Sampson, 
Fred Smith, Jesse Spearman, Robert Thompson, John Turner. 
Bottom row: Robert Turner, Hartzell Whyte, James Williams, 
Scott Wilson. 




196 





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KAPPA SIGMA— Top row: Mrs. Verne Sibley, Charles Abbey, Dar- 
win Asper, Robert Baier, Pratt Barndollar, Bill Barnes, Edwin Bideau, 
John Boles, Gordon Brown, Richard Burns, Forest Campbell, William 
Carinder, John Chitwood, Roswell Cofran. Fifth row: Sherwood Col- 
lins, John Cooper, Raymond Costello, Arthur Cotts, John Crump, 
Vernon Dalton, Charles Daneke, David Davenport, John Davenport, 
Elmer Davis, Roy Davis, Jack Dean, Jack Dunn, Wiliam Easton, Jr. 
Fourth row: Wendell Eggerman, Calvin Elder, William Faith, Elmer 
Fatzer, Kenneth Fatzer, Max Feaster, Bobby Fiser, John Hall, Robert 
Heline, Robert Hertel, Richard Holmes, William Kerby, Jack Kin- 
cheloe, F. J. Knappenberger. Third row: Wallace Lane, James Lewis, 



Paul Lyman, Dick McDonald, Edward McGill, Deems Marshall, Paul 
Martens, H. I. May, Jr., Raymond Millard, Donald Moehring, Ralph 
Moll, Dayton Molzen, Stanton Moncrief, Charles Moore. Second row: 
Bobby Newton, Paul Noynaert, Talton Pace, Charles Potucek, Jr., 
Donald Ransom, Robert Ratts, Loren Riley, Keith Rudy, William 
Schenk, Jr., Donald Scott, Robert Siefkin, Michael Slattery, Cole Smith, 
Robert Snyder. Bottom row: Godfrey Spencer, Raymond Steinbacher, 
Kenneth Steinkirchner, Richard Stockman, Max Stone, Max Tooley, 
Robert Uhl, George Volkel, Ralph Vollbracht, Roy Walker, Matthew 
Walters, James Washburn, Bill Watson. 




Kappa Sigma 



Founded in 1869 at University of Virginia 



Gamma Chi Chapter established in 1919 



One Hundred and Thirteen Chapters 
President: Arthur C. Cotts 



The Kappa Sig's: 

Are still trying to recover from the Red Dog Inn 
Party . . . 

Have a house which makes advances to the rear . . . 

Point with pride to basketball and baseball starring 
members . . . 

Have members active in Plow and Pen, Pi Tau Sigma, 
Sigma Tau, and Wampus Cats . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — having very elaborate hour dances. 

197 



THE KAPPA SIGMA Chapter House is located at 1221 Thurston. 





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PHI DELTA THETA— Top row: Mrs. Helen Miller, Gene Ackerman, 
Robert Babson, Peter Bacon, Robert Barr, Joseph Benson, Donald 
Bergstrom, Jerold Bogue, Richard Bogue, Robert Bogue, Rodney 
Breneman, Phil Brewster, Harold Broadie, Paul Brown. Sixth row: 
Robert Bruce, Jack Bruner, Joseph Cadwell, Wallace Champeny, James 
Clinger, Richard W. Clowers, Frank H. Colt, Loren D. Compton, John 
Connor, Clark Danner, Richard Dickerson, Donald Dietrick, Neil 
Erdwien, James Fassett. Fifth row: Robert Fowler, John Fuller, 
Thronton Gehrke, Richard Gorman, Donald Gray, Richard Groff, 
Albert Hancock, Richard Hanson, Loren Haynes, James Heaton, John 
Hill, Robert Hinrichs, Joseph Holmes, Carl Holt. Fourth row: Claude 
Howard, Denton Howard, Shelton Howard, Jack Howenstine, John 
Hudelson, Robert Hudelson, Donald Hueben, Walter Isaacson, Rodney 



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Keif, Richard Konold, Frederick Kramer, Marvin Kramer, John Lamb, 
Jack Landreth. Third row: Buster Lassen, William Lewis, Robert 
McCaustland, John McGill, John McKeen, Terry McMinn, Shelton 
Marlow, Fred Merrill, John Meyer, Wayne Mohr, Robert Moser, 
James Neumann, Lowell New. Second row: George O'Neal, Wendell 
Pascoe, George Pierce, Richard Powers, Leon Randolph, Stewart Ran- 
kin, Robert Rea, James Reardon, Kersey Reed, William Reichert, John 
Roberts, Jr., Henri Rondeau, Hal Ross, William Sheppard. Bottom 
row: Robert Skelton, Charles Steincamp, Bennie Stewart, Rex Stone, 
Frank Thacher, Charles Thornton, Donald Torkelson, Lloyd Walters, 
Jr., William Weaver, Albert Whiteside, Stuart Wilder, Wendell 
Williams, Herbert Woodward, William Woodward, Robert E. Young. 



Phi Delta Theta 



Founded in 1848 at Oxford, Ohio 



One Hundred and Five Chapters 

President: First Semester: Dirk Pierce 

Second Semester: Donald Bergstrom 



Gamma Chapter established 1919 




508 SUNSET is the home of Phi Delta Theta. 




The Phi Delts: 

Wish the Beta's would return their bowl trophy . . . 
Save money by dividing house bills 110 ways . . . 
Think a coupe is the only kind of a car . . . 
Are always in Y-Orpheum . . . 

Claim honor with members in Alpha Mu, Sigma Tau, 
Blue Key, Freshman Phi Kappa Phi recognition, and 
College Who's Who . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Renting rooms from people who 
have college-age daughters. 




Phi Kappa 



Founded in 1889 at Brown University, Rhode Island 

Twenty-eight chapters 
President: Leo J. Waller 



Iota Chapter established in 1921 



The Phi Kappa's: 

Tried to live outside the city limits . . . 

Would like to know who painted their cars during 

FMOC campaign . . . 

Are 100 percent Catholic . . . 

Have members active in the Business Club, Collegiate 

4-H Club, Pax and the Newman Club . . . 

Were active in intramurals . . . 

Marked their social season with a "Fish Party" and a 

St. Patricks dance . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Moonlight, candlelight, or by no 

light at all. 







THE PHI KAPPA Chapter House is located at 1909 Anderson. 



PHI KAPPA— Top row: Mrs. O. H. Halstead, Archie Armstrong, 
Arthur Beat, Joseph Bettinger, James Bhear, George Borst, William 
Borst, Philip Burns, Bernard Callahan, Robert Callahan, Alvin Desilet. 
Fourth row: Charles Dickenson, James Dickenson, Edgar Engelken, 
John Fritschen, Emil Gast, Wilbur Gaughan, John Glenn, Ralph Glotz- 
back, Charles Goris, Charles Hung, Bernard Jilka. Third row: Law- 
rence Jilka, Robert Keegan, Peter Kohlrus, Clarence Kongs, Raymond 



Kramer, Eli Lanoue, Donald Lasnier, Ronald Leduc, Patrick Leonar. i, 
Elvyn Liebl, Robert Lorson. Second row: Daniel McCarthy, Kenneth 
Mahoney, William Markey, David Melroy, Charles Niernberger, James 
Noone, Albert Paluch, Bernard Rottinghaus, Charles Ryan, John 
Schnittker, Paul Scully. Bottom row: Robert Sedlock, Thomas Skahan, 
Marion Szatalowicz, Leonard Taylor, Leo Waller, Robert Watson, 
Charles Wempe, James White, Leo Wirtz. 












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199 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

Founded 1868 at the University of Virginia Alpha Omega Chapter established in 1913 

Eighty chapters 

President First Semester: James Otto 

Second Semester: Danny Shupp 





THE PI K. A. Chapter House is located at 331 N. Seventeenth. 

PI KAPPA ALPHA — Top row: Mrs. Robert Murphy, Lawrence Adee, 
Jack Bell, Dale Berger, James Caplinger, Richard Cederberg, Anthony 
Ceranich, Leo Chappell, William Christian, Keith Cook, Charles Cope, 
Maurice Cotton. Fifth row: William Crawford, Joseph Dolton, John 
Domeny, Robert Dunlap, Ralph Eaton, Delbert Ehret, Ralph Felix, 
John Frazier, Jr., Roy Graham, James Gransberry, James Grimes, 
William Grimes. Fourth row: Robert Hagans, Robert Hall, Roy Har- 

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The Pi K. A.'s: 

Presented the Dream Girl of the Pi K. A. at the Dixie 

Ball . . . 

Form the stag line at every dance — at least three 

fourths of it . . . 

Recognized, with trumpets and heraldry, one of their 

members as King of Pep . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Pledging immunity to women 

forever — daily. 



vey, Robert Hatcher, Edmond Hauber, Richard Hemphill, Mark Hul- 
ings, Don Iiams, Kenneth Iiams, Bobby Jacobs, Earl Jarrell, Paul 
Kuckelman. Third row: Merle Lacy, Wendell Lind, Harry McLaughlin, 
Lewis Markley, Harold Metz, Allan Nelson, James Otto, Donald Pal- 
mer, Ernest Pence, Charles Plumb, Leroy Reynolds, Robert Reynolds. 
Second row: Warren Rice, William Rigler, Thomas Salyer, James 
Schuh, Michael Sestric, Jr., Lawrence Shockey, John Shupe, Danny 
Shupp, George Sigsbee, Eugene Snyder, Virgil Spiers, William R. 
Springer. Bottom roiv: Donald Stehley, John Stewart, Robert H. 
Stewart, William R. Stuart, Clanton Suiter, Howard Swanson, William 
Thogmartin, Don Thomas, Clyde Wilder, Jr., Philip Wilson, John 
Wingfield, Kenneth Winterscheidt, Clayton Wolfe. 



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SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON— Top row; Mrs. E. L. Claeren, Franklin 
Adams, George Adams, Richard Alexander, William Allen, Robert 
Allingham, Bill Aubel, William Aye, Vaughn Bolton, Robert Brewer, 
Robert Buehler, Alfred Busby, Robert Campbell, Charles Chandler. 
Sixth row: William Chandler, Wilbert Cox, Robert Curry, James 
Curtis, Frank Eaton, David Eckelman, Milton Eisenhower, Jr., Harold 
Elmer, Howard Elmer, Harold Fielding, Tom Flannelly, William Flan- 
nelly, Jack Foland, Fred Freeby. Fifth row: Walter Gage, Clark Geb- 
hart, Gene Geist, Charles Gibson, Bruce Gilbert, Robert Gillan, 
William Glover, William Green, Richard Griffing, Willis Hart, 
Keith Hemenway, Harry Hixon, James Hollenback, Bruce Hughes. 
Fourth row: William Hull, Kenneth Hunt, Dewey Huston, James 
Irvine, Bernard Johnson, Harold Johnson, William Johnston, Charles 



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Kaup, Robert Kern, Robert Kirkpatrick, Gale Kloeffler, Fred Kramer, 
Rudolph Kramer, Gene Kubicki. Third row: Robert Larberg, Gary 
Lichty, Richard Lindblom, Max Lingafelter, Doyle Loe, Jack Logan, 
Robert McKee, Ross Miller, Tom Moreen, William Morgan, Robert 
Muirhead, Richard Nabours, William Neil, William Nicholson. Sec- 
ond row: William Often, Dan Phillips, Dean Popkins, Ben Price, Jr., 
James Pruden, Robert Reed, William Rickert, Carlton Robertson, 
Ira Rogers, Jr., William Schovee, Everett Stephenson, John Sterns, 
Virgil Sunquist, Ray Thompson. Bottom row: John Tow, Virgil 
Tucker, Robert Ulrich, Bud Ungles, Jack Vanier, Jerry Vanier, Larry 
Watts, Jack Weber, James Wesley, Wayne Weyrich, Kenyon Whitney, 
Walter Whitney, Bob Willard, Hervey Wright. 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Founded 1856 at University of Alabama 



One Hundred and Nineteen Chapters 
President First Semester: Doyle Loe 
Second Semester: Everett Stephenson 



Kansas Beta Chapter established 1913 



SIG ALPH MEMBERS live at 1856 College Heights. 



The SAE's: 

Forgot to set a quota . . . 

Stil have their band and campaigns . . . 

Have members prominent in Sigma Tau, Steel Ring 

Block and Bridle and Alpha Phi Omega . . . 

Can't serenade because they won't learn to sing . . . 

Tied for first in Y-Orpheum last year . . . 

Just redecorated the inside of their house . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Having a date once every two 

months. 



**■ 



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Sigma Nu 



Founded in 1869 at Virginia Military Institute 



One hundred and one chapters 
President: Earl Couchman 





THE SIGMA NU HOUSE tops the hill at 513 Sunset. 

SIGMA NU — Top row: Mrs. Eleanore Mitchell, LeRoy Allman, Dean 
Arnold, Don Arnold, Bill Bachelor, Leland Baird, Doran Barham, 
Alvin Becker, Jack Beshears, Raymond Binford, Gene Campbell, Ray- 
mond Conrad, Earl Couchman, Donald Davis. Fifth row: Jim Dieter, 
Marvin Dungan, Al Fletcher, Harold Folck, Forris Frick, William 
Froelich, Harry Funke, Duane Gregg, Raymond Hanna, Jack Harmon, 
Hal Hawkins, Bob Heckler, Charles Heinze, Robert Herwig. Fourth 
row: Donald Hill, John Huenefeld, Russell Jones, William Katz, Jim 
Keena, Douglas Kloxin, Robert Knight, Dwight Kortman, Paul La- 
Croix, Theodore Lothman, Billie McEachern, James McKitterick, 
Richard Matthew, John Meisner. Third row: Raymond Morton, Jack 



Beta Kappa Chapter, established in 1892 



The Sigma Nu's: 

Count their steps daily to assure themselves of 

the highest position on the hill . . . 

Charge admission for a glimpse of the Heart Throb 

King . . . 

Have members active in Steel Ring, Sigma Tau, and 

many other organizations . . . 

Hold chapter meeting Saturday nights in Leonard- 

ville . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — throwing picnics in the forest 

behind their house. 



Moss, Robert Newman, Gerald Patrick, Jack Pendleton, Lowell Poague, 
Arlan Potwin, Bob Quinlan, Richard Ramsey, Frank Ratts, Keith Reh, 
Carl Reinking, Paul Remmele, Robert Rogers. Second row: Dan Ryan, 
Stephen Sage, Ernest Schultz, Clifford Schumacher, Howard Shannon, 
Edward Shaw, Robert Shaw, Guy Shelley, James Shelley, William 
Shenkel, John Simmons, Bob Smith, David Smith, Gene Smith. 
Bottom row: Robert Soelter, Douglas Stock, Max Sutter, Richard 
Swanson, Vance Templeton, Herschel Tognascioli, Joe Tognascioli, 
Jim Vestring, Clyde Walthall, Gene Welch, Charles Werhan, Gene 
Yeager, Joe Zollinger. 




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SIGMA PHI EPSILON— Top row: Mrs. Ruth Daughters, Bob Adams, 
John Amstutz, Jack Badley, Jim Battin, Art Beach, Don Bickle, Bill 
Boldenow, Rod Boyles, Kenneth Bretz, Bill Bridgewater, Don Brook- 
over. Fifth row: Harrison Brookover, Don Button, John Clark, 
Ward Clark, Darrell Cowell, Dan Cox, Bruce Cunningham, Jon 
Duell, Rex Dulaney, Russ Duncan, Phil Gard. Fourth row: James 
Grandfield, Gene Griffith, Bob Haney, Walt Harman, Bill Harper, 
Bob Harrar, Norman Held, Jim Heter, Harold Hines, Harold 



Howey, Pete James, Bud Jones. Third row: Paul Jorgenson, Hugh 
Kirkpatrick, Bernard Knowles, Max Krey, Allan Langton, Bob Lewis, 
Ben Lind, Bill Manion, Bud Means, Harold Mitchell, Norman Morti- 
mer, George Nelson. Second row: Bob Norton, George Paul, Ted 
Paul, Rollin Prather, Bob Robbins, Dick Roby, Jack Sampson, Marion 
Shoop, Ralph Sjogren, Glen Springer, Phil Stallard, Dean Strowig. 
Bottom row: Jim Taylor, Dave Vanhaverbeke, Perry Wayman, Bill 
White, Jim White, Bernie Williams, Bob Yadon, Mike Zeleznak. 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 



Founded 1901 at Richmond College, Virginia 

Seventy-nine chapters 

President First Semester: Harold Hines 

Second Semester: John Clark 



Kansas Beta chapter established 1915 



The Sig Eps: 

Boast enough athletes as members to start their 
own football and basketball teams . . . 
Have members active in Scabbard and Blade, K Fra- 
ternity, and Gamma Phi Epsilon . . . 
Had hundreds of costume parties . . . 
Placed first in most Greek intramural activities . . . 
Are happy because most members have cars so they 
can ride to the back door rather than use the 
fifty-five steps to the house . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Giving all sororities an album of 
Sig Ep sweetheart songs. 



THE SIGMA PHI EPSILON house is located at 221 N. Delaware 






















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TAU KAPPA EPSILON— Top row: Mrs. James A. Jackson, Wendell 
Adell, Wayne Allgire, Karl Anderson, Walter Andrea, Elliott, Bab- 
cock, Charles Becker, Albert Bellinger, Guy Bemis, Hardy Berry, 
Julius Binder, Phil Bowman, Jerry Brotherson, Harold Bryan. Fifth 
row: Melvin Burkhead, Elwyn Church, James W. Clark, Lawrence 
Clark, Donald Cline, Robert Colby, Verne Converse, Robert Craven, 
Arch Curtis, Robert Daly, Melford DeWald, John Duer, Jack Dunlap, 
Casey Edell. Fourth row: Earl Elliott, Neil Ericson, Ted Falen, Don 
Ford, Richard Fulcher, Jules Funston, Irvine Gandee, James Gilmore, 
Charles Goss, Gerald Graham, Robert Guipre, Sidney Hamilton, 
Arthur Hildenbrand, Gerald Houk. Third row: Shannon Howland, 



William Hurst, Arleigh Imel, Norman Johnson, William R. John- 
ston, Rolland A. Jones, Ted Jones, James A. Jordan, Robert Kirgis, 
Loyal Lederer, Edgar McNeil, Max Main, Kenneth Mills, Howard 
Neighbor, Richard Newcomb. Second row: Richard Parker, Robert 
Pearson, Robert Pettit, Lorraine Rees, David Relihan, Bernard Roach, 
Floyd Sageser, Delmar Salberg, Gail Salisbury, Ross Schimmels, 
Wilbert Schultejans, Frederick Schwab, Paul Schwartz, Lowell Scoggan. 
Bottom row: Calvin Simonton, Don Stevens, Everett Taylor, Vern 
Thomas, Delbert Torkelson, Donald Vohs, James D. Weatherby, 
Cecil Wells, Jr., Louis Wempe, Harold Williams, Charles Wyble, 
William Young. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Founded 1899 at Bloomington, Illinois 



Alpha Lambda chapter established 1931 



Fifty-four chapters 
President: Al Bellinger 




THE TKE house is located at 1606 Fairchild 




The TKE's: 

Have managed to keep their placque so far this year . . . 

Are running the Sig Eps a close race for intramural championships . . . 

Have members as presidents of Student Council, K Fraternity, and 

senior class . . . 

Took second place for the best float in Homecoming parade . . . 

Marked their social season with Fall formal, Christmas House Party, 

and pledge-active reversal party . . . 

Wont' pledge a man who isn't a politician . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — using other members to get their dates. 

204 





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THETA XI — To£ row: Mrs. Jesse Conkey, Maurice Arnold, Robert 
Arnold, Robert Bader, Arlo Bailey, Charles Baxter, Robert Blair, 
Richard Brenner, Fred Bruenger, Glenn Byrd, Jr., Lyman Cavin, 
Joe Chronister. Fourth row: Fordyce Conkey, Earl DeLay, Leslie 
Dermr.tt, Joseph Fagg, Philip Garrison, William Gilbert, Jack Habig, 
Dalas Hamilton, Norman Hansen, Merle Hicks, Bill Hiefner, Joe 
Hodgson. Third row: Donald Hoff, Glen Jacobson, David Jennings, 
Harry Jennings, Jr., William Johnson, Royce Larsen, Daniel Lingel- 



bach, David Livers, Jr., Sammy Manos, Davis Mattson, Marion Mayall, 
William Mierau. Second row: William Mount, Harold Nelson, Ken- 
neth Nelson, Harry Pearce, Ernest Plegge, James Robinett, Arlyn 
Rowland, Paul Ruggels, Herbert Schoonover, Merle Schwab, Richard 
Sidwell, Harold Smith. Bottom row: Lewis Stratton, Walter Thomas, 
Harold Van Amburg, Duane Van Horn, Gene Ward, Loren Wiens, 
Gerald Wilhelm, Dale Wiseman, Louis Woodburn, Jr., Frank Wylie. 




Founded in 1861 at Troy. New York 



Theta Xi 



Thirty-six chapters 

President: First Semester: Walter Thomas 

Second Semester: Tom Conkey 



Alpha Iota chapter established 1931 



The Theta Xi's: 

Participated in all intramurals, but can't seem to make 

the grade . . . 

Had a special welcoming day for alumni on Founder's 

Day . . . 

Had a French cabaret theme for their annual Tuffy 

Strut! . . . 

Are proud of their active members in Sigma Tau and 

Phi Lambda Upsilon . . . 

Still house bombastic pigeons in their garage . . . 

Welcomed the Spring with a formal dinner and 

dance . . . 

MAKE LOVE BY — Cooing in the style of their pigeons. 



MEMBERS OF THETA XI live at 1640 Fairchild 




205 




I'VE ALWAYS thought rather kindly of myself. I've considered myself a well-rounded Hill, pro- 
ducing great men in nearly every field. But for a while there, I was beginning to develop an 
inferiority complex about my ability to provide a steady foundation for my employees and athletes 
on the testing ground of sports. 

In football especially, my students battled on through the mire of defeat — but they hadn't 
plowed over the goal line in Memorial Stadium enough times in the last two years to win a single 
game on me — or any other Hill, either for that matter. Don't get me wrong, I wasn't blaming any- 
one but myself. 

Then along came Jack Gardner's "Cinderella Kids" and I felt as big as Mount Whitney. They 
bolstered my ego. They raised my spirits and lifted the dark brown fog that had been hovering over 
the attitude about athletics among both my students and faculty. 

The basketball five just missed hitting the top rung of national prestige, and filled country-wide 
papers with tales extolling my glory. That's the sort of thing I like to see. Girls and boys fought 
amiably for tickets to holler their lungs out for the team — they queued up for whole afternoons to 
be assured of a seat at evening games. 

They jammed the Student Union to get direct broadcasts and whooped it up with every basket. 
They marched triumphantly to the train station to meet the team returning from games played on 
other Hills. The players and coach were the heroes of the hour. 

207 



Stakes are again being driven into my side, and this time I welcome them. They denote the actual 
beginning of the field house for which K-Staters have paid and prayed for years. If the size of the 
thing is any indication, it's going to be a beauty. The war, shortage of materials and high prices have 
held up construction of this field house since the years the money was first appropriated. But some- 
how, I'm beginning to picture high tiers of bleachers filled with fans, every man a wildcat. All this, 
plus the money that townspeople and alumni will bring in when I have room to seat them. 

Although golf, swimming and tennis teams were continually outclassed by superior competition, 
my baseball fortunes steadily climbed. Lud Fiser's batmen battled nip and tuck for the championship 
last spring. The Iowa State Cyclones blew the Cats from the top rung to third place with their 
sparkling victory in the last loop contest. The Wildcats' 16 wins in 22 outings salvaged some cheer 
for both me and the team. 

I was genuinely lonesome when one of my great men died late in the winter. Michael Ahearn, past 
Director of Athletics, had always been one of my closest friends. He understood me and was a great 
credit to me. It will be a long time before there is another like him. 

Football coaches have whirled across my face so often in the past few years that I had no sooner 
felt their spiked shoes in my tender grass when they were gone to greener Hills. They all tried hard 
to bring me out of the depths of football doom, but none in recent times succeeded. I'm looking for- 
ward with every confidence to the new season with Ralph Graham. 

Now that I've said all this, and balancing the picture up, it seems that between total wins and 
losses in all fields of sports, I've remained pretty average — but try to tell that to either my football 
or basketball rooters. 




208 




Howlingly happy K-Staters rushed Coach Jack Gardner off 
his feet (above) after the K.U. game played at Lawrence. The 
one-point victory was the signal for mass demonstrations, a 
1:30 a.m. night declared by the Dean of Women, and a 
surging, pushing, clamorous crowd besieging the President and 
the president of the Student Council for a school holiday. The 
game cinched the Big Seven basketball crown, besides being 
a thrilling triumph over the school down the river. 



%a*U Qa Wild Ad Qanda&i 
And Bo-ifd, Come <So4*te 



Victory-starved Wildcat fans roared their lungs out for the basket- 
ball team on its return from the invitational pre-season tourney in 
Kansas City. When mighty Indiana fell before the five, fans knew 
the team was on a triumphant march. (Upper right) mutual "thank- 
you's" are exchanged between the team members and the loyal crowd 
as shakers wave, the band plays and Wildcats scream. Cheerleaders 
do a victory dance at the train station (center). The train bearing the 
heroes comes barreling down the track (bottom) as fans crane their 
necks for a first glimpse of the men of the hour. 




209 




Behind the band — spirit and torches rode high in the parade 



Eager K-Staters crowded around the vat to dip their 
torches in preparation for gala parade (bottom). 



210 



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Pledge power and mechanical genius produced huge 
figures and signs before fraternity houses on Homecoming 
weekend. First place winner in the judging was Alpha 
Gamma Rho (center), the Beta's popped their way to 
second (upper right), and the Phi Delt's came straight 
down the alley to take third place (lower right). 

211 



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General "Ike" Eisenhower snapped to "Ten'shun!" 
(upper center) as the Stars and Stripes swung by at 
the Homecoming parade. Kansas State President Mil- 
ton smiles happily beside his brother, guest of honor 
for weekend festivities. 

Sailing down Poyntz, the winning float (left 
center) was an impressive result of the combined 
labors of Waltheim Hall and East Stadium. 

Crowds jammed the streets (lower left) from the 
downtown district to Aggieville, shown here, to 
glimpse the colorful parade. 



212 




Twenty-five thousand alumni and visitors from all parts of the state assembled 
(above) to hear Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower speak at the chapel dedication the 
afternoon of the Homecoming game, October 25. 



Smiling at the cameras, "Ike" broke the first sod at the memorial chapel site 
{lower right). With the General, were Dr. L. F. Payne, College department head 
(left), and brother — President Milton S. Eisenhower. 



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Queen Carol Campbell, Pi Beta Phi, who ruled over 
the Homecoming weekend, smiles at the crowd (left), 
as she circles the field with Governor Frank Carlson 
and attendant Shirley Bynum, Waltheim Hall, at game 
half-time. 



Purple Pepsters and the College band filled the air 
with balloons and music at the half of the Home- 
coming game (below). 



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214 




fecdl CtauttU 
Weekend 



"And here we have . . ." says John Aiken, 
Blue Key president, as he introduces Kansas 
State's royalty {upper center) for the Home- 
coming Ball. Left to right they are attendant 
Shirley Bynum, Waltheim Hall, Queen Carol 
Campbell, Pi Phi, and attendant Pat Harger, 
Van Zile Hall. 

Wampus Cats and Purple Pepsters give that 
last-minute encouragement to the team as they 
go to the Homecoming battlefield {right 
center). 

One of the major social events of the year 
was the big Homecoming Ball shown at 
lower right. 




215 




ENERGETIC THURLO 
McCrady, 40 year old 
athletics director, in 
his first year at K- 
State has helped de- 
velop an athletic pro- 
gram that is definitely 
on the upgrade. He is 
a frequent speaker at 
high school banquets. 



A T THE END of the 1948 spring semester, the 
Kansas State Athletic Council hoped it had placed 
Wildcat athletics firmly on their way to rehabilitation. 
During the 1947-48 school year, the Council made five 
appointments and approved three others. The newest 
additions to the K-State sports family appointed by the 
Council are Ralph Graham, head football coach; Fred 
Winters, freshman basketball coach; Leon Reynard, 



K-State Athletics on Up-Grade 

wrestling coach; Ben York, golf coach and Ted War- 
ren, alumni field representative. It approved Graham's 
appointments of Paul Walker, end coach; Emmett 
Breen, backfield coach and John Crawley, line coach. 

Heading the athletics staff is Thurlo McCrady. The 
Director completed his first year at Kansas State in 
March. "Mac" is determined to do his part in putting 
the Wildcat sports program on a plane comparable to 
those of other conference schools. 

The most important coaching appointment was the 
one that brought Ralph Graham back to his alma 
mater. Graham was a three-sports star at Kansas State 
in the early thirties. He was all Big Six fullback and 
led the conference scoring for three years. In 1932 he 
was the nation's second high football scorer. Graham 
came to Kansas State after three successful years of 
coaching at Wichita University. Emmett Breen and 
John Crawley are also former Wildcat grid stars. 

Leon Reynard, selected as wrestling coach to succeed 
his former teacher "Pat" Patterson, is one of the greatest 
all-time Wildcat grapplers. 



THE ATHLETICS COUNCIL meets with four members of the athletics 
department. They are top row: Jack Gardner, basketball coach; Milton 
S. Eisenhower, president; Dean M. A. Durland, Ralph Graham, football 
coach and Thurlo McCrady, athletics director. Front row: Dean R. A. 



Babcock, Dave Weatherby, Prof. V. D. Foltz, Lud Fiser, baseball coach 
and Prof. H. H. Haymaker. Dr. H. H. King, Prof. Merton Otto and Bill 
Ballard, alumni representative were not present. 




216 




SMILING FRED PARRIS directed K-Stote sports pub- 
licity to ai all-time high. Under his guidance, 
Wildcat sports received nation wide press associ- 
ation, news photo service and radio coverage. He 
doubles as radio news and journalism instructor. 
Frank Myers (right) had one of his busiest years as 
business manager of athletics as the Wildcat bas- 
ketball team played before 175,000 people. He 
handled ticket and financial problems. 




Ted Warren also came to Manhattan from Wichita 
where he served as assistant to Graham. His job, which 
brings him into contact with alumni leaders and high 
school talent over Kansas, is a progressive Kansas State 
athletics movement. 

Fred Winters came to Kansas State from the West 
Coast. The freshman basketball coach is a former 
University of Southern Califronia star. Besides work- 
ing with future varsity material, Winters assists Head 

NEW FOOTBALL COACH Ralph Graham meets one of his players at 
a "get acquainted" confab in Rec Center. Freshman Coach Lud Fiser 
makes the introduction. Graham is one of K-State's all-time football 



Coach Jack Gardner and serves as basketball scout. 

The saddest moment of the sports year was the death 
in February of M. F. Ahearn, director of athletics emeri- 
tus and golf coach. "Mike" was Kansas State's most 
successful football coach. His 1910 team is the only 
one in K-State history to win as many as nine games. 
His 1906 team was the first to defeat Kansas University. 

Benny York, a former golf captain, was appointed 
golf coach. 



stars and came to this school after several years of successful coaching 
at Wichita University. 




217 




LEADING THE SCHOOL in cheers and yells this year were left to right, 
Shirley King; Barney Johnson; Betty Bicknell; Jim Wilson; the anony- 



mous Wildcat; Barbara Baker Engelhardt; Bob Dunlap; Nadine Smith. 
Later in the season, Phyllis Lou Johnson replaced Barbara Engelhardt 



Pep Groups Work for School and Team 



T^OUR boys and four girls led students in cheers this 
year. Bob Dunlap was head cheerleader. New yells 
were put into use, and the cheerleaders were the back- 
bone of every pep rally held in the city. 

They were responsible for leading the victory-starved 
Cat fans to a cheering win in backing the highly success- 
ful basketball five. The cheerleaders sent the team 
telegrams when out-of-town games were played. 



The Wampus Cats, local pep chapter of the national 
Pi Epsilon Pi, numbered 70 members this year. Backing 
all pep functions, the Wampus Cats sponsored the 
annual Wildcat Dandelion Day on the campus last 
spring. 

Officers for the year were Gordon Herr, president; 
Mike Sestric, vice-president; Larry McManis, secretary; 
and Bob Kimmel, treasurer. 



WAMPUS CATS— Back row: Vern Thomas, Donald Reinhardt, Roy 
Sias, Dean Page, Dana Childs, Melvin Barb, Harold Williams, Law- 
rence McCarty, Dee Webb, Dean Streiff, Paul Whiteside. Fourth row: 
Russell Duncan, Wilbur E. Brown, Donald Hoff, Laurel Goddard, 
Delmar Salberg, Robert Dixon, Donald McCracken, Pete Bacon, 
Wayne Bartels, Billy Langhofer. Third row: Wilbur Born, Richard 
Tesche, James J. Curtis, John Stanley, James Watkins, John Stohr, 



Bill Merwarth, Bob Kimmel, Bus Lassen, Bill Geiger, Ken Cowan. 
Second row: Raymond Kramer, Maurice Wear, Albert Paluch, Darrel 
Canfield, George Goller, Allan Nelson, Willis Adams, Clark Danner, 
David Melroy, James Washburn, Joe Hodgson. Front row: Robert 
Kelly, Russell Settle, Jack Connor, Michael Sestric, Gordon Herr, 
Robert Dunlap, Lawrence McManis, Frank Thacher, Donald Bickle, 
Lowell Adee. 




218 



Grid Season Disastrous 

T^OR THE second successive season Kansas State's 
football team failed to win a game. The school 
ended the 1947 season by losing its 26th consecutive 
contest. This long victory drought is more extensive 
than that of any other major college team in the 
country. 

The 1947 season was unique in that it was the third 
attempt in as many years for a different coaching staff 
to lift the fortunes of the fall sport from the lowly 
depths to which it had sunk. 

Five conference opponents amassed a total of 157 
points while limiting K-State to 27. 





7947 Seaso 


i's Record 




Kansas State 





Oklahoma A & M 


12 


Kansas State 


6 


Texas Mines 


20 


Kansas State 


18 


New Mexico 


20 


Kansas State 


13 


Boston College 


49 


Kansas State 


7 


Missouri 


47 


Kansas State 


7 


Nebraska 


14 


Kansas State 





Kansas 


55 


Kansas State 


13 


Oklahoma 


27 


Kansas State 





Iowa State 


14 


Kansas State 


7 


Florida 


25 



Coach Sam Francis' team won the hearts of its sup- 
porters by showing fighing determinaion in three of 
the contests. Although outmanned in the way of ex- 
perience and reserve strength, the Cats turned in com- 
mendable performances against Oklahoma A and M, 
Nebraska and Oklahoma. 




FORMER ALL-AMERICAN Sam Francis was Kansas State's 
third football coach in three years. The hard-working former 
Nebraska fullback's resignation was accepted by the Board 
of Regents at the end of the season. 

Francis was faced with the problem of designing 
a scoring machine from material that was sadly lacking 
in fast backfield men. As the season wore on it became 
apparent that any chances the Wildcats had for victories 
were in throwing up a stubborn defense and hope for 
the fortunes of good breaks. 

Francis was credited by the majority of his players 
as being a hard worker and a fine fellow. 



FOOTBALL SQUAD— Back row: John Findley, Norvall Neve, Sam 
Francis, Frank Owens. Fourth row: George Tadeusiak, Jim Stehley, 
Dana Atkins, Royce Pence, Leroy Dawson, Derrill Bartley, Sam 
Muscolino, John Conley. Third row: Don Stehley, Ron Webster, 
Tom Christopoulos, Ray Romero, Jack Sharp, Galen Christiansen, 
George Smith, Dick Bogue, Dave Schirmer. Second row: Lowell 



o 



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Breeden, Bill Melody, Grover Nutt, Edgar McNeil, Bob Berry, Larry 
King, Clarence Heath, Rollin Prather, Tom Smith. Front row: 
Harold Bryan, Verne Converse, Wendell Pollock, Bob Curry, Joe 
Blanchard, Clarence Branch, Duane Holder, Ray Holder, Ted Grimes, 
Harry Merriman. 



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TWELVE THOUSAND FANS saw the first Kansas State night football game. Although hopelessly outclassed, a stubborn Kansas 
State team held the classy Oklahoma A and M Cowboys to 12 points. 



Wildcats Meet First Defeat 



Oklahoma A and M opened the season by defeating the Wildcats 12 to at Manhattan in 
the first home night game played by a Big Six team. From the opening kickoff the Aggies 
dominated the offensive play. They scored first early in the game. Their last touchdown came 
in the second half. 

Kansas State made five first downs and ended the evening with a minus two yards rush- 
ing. A touchdown pass, Bill Church to Larry King, was nullified by a penalty. Dave 
Schirmer, Vern Converse and Ed McNeil, backed up by the rest of the line, thwarted several 
potential Cowboy scores. 

LARRY KING, (left) veteran end, leaps high to snag a pass. Harold Bryan, (lower left) a mainstay in the Wildcat backfield, 
did most of the team's punting. Sparkplug Dana Atkins (bottom center) moved up to take over quarterback duties midway 
through the season. Vic Jones (lower right) played a lot of fullback when he was not on the injury list. 






HUSKY TOM CHRISTOPOULOS (upper left) scored two touchdowns against Boston College. George Smith (top center) was a 
Wildcat end. Underslung Bob Berry (right) lettered for the third time at guard. Little Harry Merriman, one of the few fast , 
ball carriers on the squad, (lower right) earned his third football letter. 

At Hands of Non-League Teams 



An underrated Texas Mines team ran over the Cats 20 to 6 at El Paso. The Miners ran 
up 23 first downs and 532 scrimmage yards to four first downs and 155 yards for the Wild- 
cats. Ted Grimes scored the K-State touchdown. 

Kansas State matched touchdowns with New Mexico at Manhattan. The lack of a place 
kicking specialist was the difference in the 2 to 18 game. 

Jim Stehley tallied the first touchdown ag ainst the Lobos on a beautiful 28 yard run. 
Clever footwork, not speed, wove the elusive fullback through the New Mexico secondary. 
Bill Church's last period passing was another fe ature of the Cat's offensive show. He completed 
four straight passes, the last going to Wendell Pollock for a score. 



TEXAS MINES BIG GUN Ed Smith reels off the yards before being hemmed in by K-Staters Webster (33), Jones (52), 
Church (29) and Romero (45). 







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WILDCAT HALFBACK Ronnie Webster starred on 
defense (left). Chunky quarterback Bob Curry passed 
for a fourth quarter touchdown at Boston (center). 
Ted Grimes, hard running fullback, made first Kansas 
State touchdown for 1947 (right). Leroy Dawson (lower 
left) plugged one of the tackle spots in the Wildcat 
line. 




Team Fights Losing 



A tremendously powerful Boston College eleven trounced Kansas 
State 49 to 13 at Boston. The Wildcats won the admiration of 21,000 
fans when they refused to quit and came back to notch two fourth quarter 
touchdowns. Tom Christopoulos scored both counters. He took a long 
pass from Bob Curry for the first one and went over from the one yard 
line for the other. 

The Missouri Tigers swamped Kansas State under a deluge of tricky 
laterals 47 to 7 at Columbia. The Wildcats went for naught on the 
ground, and Bill Church's passing was the main feature of the Wildcats 
offensive show. He ran up 165 aerial yards and hit 11 of 28 flips. 

A PACK OF WILDCATS BRING down a New Mexico Lobo in the close night game. The final score 
was 20 to 18. 




mm 




HAROLD BRYAN RUNS UP YARDAGE against Nebraska in the Homecoming tilt before 17,000 fans. General Dwiglit 
D. Eisenhower and other dignitaries. 



Battle in Early Season 



Inspired by a large Homecoming crowd, Gen. Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower and the superb play of little Dana Atkins, the underdog 
Wildcats put up a great battle before going down to Nebraska 14 
to 7. They kept 17,000 fans screaming and Nebraska Coach Bernie 
Masterson jumping for the entire game. Two breaks aided the 
Huskers in their victory. 

Jim Stehley scored the game's first touchdown on a twisting 5 1 
yard jaunt. Atkins' quarterback play was perhaps the best individual 
Cat performance of the season. He lugged four Nebraska punts 
upfield for 69 yards, and halted a potential Husker touchdown drive 
by intercepting a pass. His spirit and offensive drive headed the Cats 
goalward on several occasions, but each time the heavier Huskers 
withstood the assault. 




CLARENCE BRANCH (upper right) was the best 
all-around Kansas State end. Rollin Prather has 
promise of becoming a great end (center right). 
He was named to Boston College's all-opponent 
team. Huck Heath (lower right) won his fourth 
varsity football letter at a tackle position. 
Heath played with Bill Melody (lower center) 
in the Mo-Kan bowl game at Kansas City. 
Melody, a transfer from South Dakota State, 
was a smart defensive center. 





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DAVE SCHIRMER, CAT GUARD goes down to block out a Husker as Tom Christopoulos moves around the Nebraska 
right end for a gain. The game was played before thousands of Homecoming fans and a large delegation from the Neb- 
raska school. 



Cats Routed By Jayhawks 



Kansas State fans who traveled to Lawrence to wit- 
ness the annual intra-state rivalry between Kansas Uni- 
versity and the Wildcats, saw the worst football ex- 
hibition put on by a Wildcat team in years. 

The conference co-champions hardly got a workout 
during the 55 to rout. Besides running up the lop- 
sided score, the Jayhawkers didn't allow the sloppily 
geared Kansas State offensive to penetrate into Kansas 
territory until the final quarter, and then the Wildcats 
went into the forbidden land via 15 yards paced off 
by the referee. The bitter defeat culminated a dark, 
dismal day for players and fans alike. 



A SMART, SHIFTY RUNNER, Jim Stehley 
(upper left), had no legs for opposing 
tacklers . . . was slowed by a severely 
pulled muscle late in the season. Three 
big reasons why the Wildcat line was 
tough to budge were (left to right) Sam 
Muscolino, guard, Verne Converse, tackle, 
and Bob Fanisher, guard. 



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Give Sooners Full Afternoon 



Following the Lawrence massacre, the Wildcats 
pulled themselves together and met the Oklahoma Soon- 
ers, holders of the other half of the title. The contrast 
between the K. U. performance and the battle put up 
by the Cats against the Sooners was comparable to 
black and white. Although bowing to Oklahoma 28 
to 13, Kansas State played its best game of the season. 
In losing to a greatly superior club, the Kansas State 
team capured the respect of 12,000 fans and 35 Sooner 
football players. 



Kansas State scored the first touchdown of the game 
when Dana Atkins hit Clarence Branch with a pass. 
The Sooners stormed back to tie the score immediately, 
then gradually went into the lead. 

The last Kansas State touchdown was scored by 
Branch on one of the trickiest plays shown by the Cats 
all season. With a double flanker formation set up 
with Branch, Christopoulos, and Bryan wide, Atkins 
took the ball from center and lateralled far across the 
field to Bryan, who heaved 45 yards to Branch in the 
clear. 



GALE LEHMANS (top) was a good defensive back. Ray Romero (center 
right) started season as fullback, moved to guard where he stood out. 
Center John Conley (right) was a tough, plucky line backer. 
(Far right) guard Ed McNeil, who suffered an early season 
ailment came back late to bolster the line. (Below) . . . one 
of the few times a K.U. back was stopped for no gain. 




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JIM STEHLEY MOVES OFF for a short gain against Oklahoma. (Left row top to bottom) 
Letterman Grover Nutt, center; Dave Schirmer, guard; Royce Pence, center; Gale Christiansen, 
end. (Inside row top to bottom) Dick Bogue, end; Wendell Pollock, back; Joe Blanchard, tackle. 



Drop Into League Cellar 



The Wildcats closed their conference play against Iowa State at Ames. 
Going down 14 to 0, Kansas State dropped into the cellar for the third 
straight season. The condition of the playing field was extremely poor. 
An all-night snow blanketed the gridiron and forced workmen to scrape 
the field before game time. Soon after the opening kickoff the turf was 
turned into a quagmire. 

Iowa Sate scored its first touchdown after recovering a third quarter 
fumble on the Kansas State four yard line. The Cyclones moved 52 
yards on two pass plays for the other counter. Harold Bryan's kicking 
stood out for Kansas State. Offensively the Cats picked up a skimpy 
43 yards to 242 for the Cyclones. The loss of Atkins by a severely cut 
leg early in the contest darkened Wildcat hopes for a win. 

The Cats traveled to Gainesville, Fla. to drop their tenth game of 
the season and the school's twenty-sixth sraight. The 'Gators from the 
University of Florida nailed the lid on the miserable season with a 25 
to 7 smash. 

Several members of Lud Fiser's frosh squad which battled the varsity 
on even terms weekly, offered hope for better football years to come. 



226 





PURPLE PEPSTERS— Back row: Virginia Olson, Nancy Wilcox, 
Mary F. Jennings, Eileen Clark, Dorothy Stover, Jean Walters, Vir- 
ginia Schmidt, Helen Morton, Dorothy Eggerman, Joe Morgan, Marie 
Rock. Third row: Jean Worley, Donna Weixelman, Louise Mosier, 
Pauline Nordstrom, Doris Marshall, Janey Thomas, Naomi Fralick, 

PURPLE PEPSTERS— Back row: Jean Howell, Marilyn Jones, Donna 
Kraemer, Betty Dickinson, Mary Alice Wolf, Marjorie Ketterman, 
Betty Zarger, Georgia Johnson, Bonna Jean Maxfeild, Barbara Bross. 
Third row: Delia Ann Fox, Jane Rogers, Norma White, Maxine 
Keesling, Nancy Munger, Norma Huddleston, Martha Beckman, 



Darlene Lygrisse, Deloris Montague, Donna Ashlock, Louise Barnes. 
Second row: Rebecca Tice, Virginia Eddy, Donna Kahl, Lois Kieffer, 
Edwina Frick, Eleanor Hardin, Georgine Bischoff, Virginia Dibbens, 
Eleanor Nixon, Gwyn Kimbell, Shirley Smith, Florence Dubb. Front 
row: Shirley King, Barbara Baker. 

Shirley Nichols, Willa Mills, Betty Williams, Martha Miller. Second 
row: Mary Watkins, Darilene Hague, Jane Engle, Patty Wilcox, 
Thelma Moore, Mary Teaford, Dorothy Dooley, Ruth Kelling, 
Margaret Jett, Thelma Stous, Virginia Furlong. Front row: Nadine 
Smith, Betty Bicknell. 



Pepsters Enthusiastic in Successful Year 



T)EP and enthusiasm flowed high this year as the 
Purple Pepsters, K-State's chapter of the national 
organization Phi Sigma Chi, turned on the speed that 
made 1947-48 the most successful year in the history 
of the chapter. 

Beating leap year to the punch, the girls took the 
boys to the annual Pepster's Gold Diggers Ball, an all- 
school affair. The highlight of the evening was the 
crowning of Bob Dunlap as King of Pep. 

The Pepsters also sponsored a new attraction to the 
campus, the Heart Throb Ball, on Valentine's Day. 
Bob Rogers was crowned King of Hearts during the 
night's festivities. 

Their big project was buying new sweaters for the 



organization. This was financed by the group through 
several money-raising activities. 

The members chartered buses for trips to the Ne- 
braska-Kansas State basketball game at Lincoln and for 
the NCAA district basketball play-offs between Okla- 
homa A and M, and Kansas State in Kansas City, Mo. 
The Purple Pepsters also played an important part in 
the successful "Gifts for Gardner and the Boys" drive 
in the spring. 

Headed by Naomi Fralick, president, the officers of 
the Purple Pepsters led a well-organized group of 72 
members which did not fail to back all activities in the 
interest of college pep and varsity teams. 



227 



Sports Spotlight on K-State as Cats Capture 



YVTINNING 20 of 24 games during the regular 
season and 2 of 4 post season games, the Kansas 
State basketball team brought the College national 
sports recognition. The highlight of the season was a 
sensational last-half victory over Kansas which brought 
Kansas State its first basketball championship since 
1919- This Cinderella season, by a team that finished 
in a tie for last place in the conference the season before, 
amazed sports experts, and was a blessing to the sinking 
athletic spirit at the College. 

After winning three early season games against 
Rockhurst, 52 to 37; Culver-Stockton, 55 to 34; and 
Texas Christian 75 to 17, the Cats gave indications of 
the great season ahead when they whipped highly 
touted Indiana 61 to 53 at Kansas City. 

Later the same week after beating Indiana, the Wild- 
cats returned to the Kansas City boards and captured the 
pre-season Big Seven Tournament. 

After trailing Oklahoma most of the first half, the 

KANSAS STATE upset Oklahoma A and M to win Big Seven tourna- 
ment. The Wildcats' 50 points was the second highest total accumulated 
against the defensive-minded Cowboys in the last 10 years. 





JACK GARDNER brought Kansas State its best 
basketball season in history during his fifth year 
at the school. Gardner turned down lucrative offers 
to remain at the Wildcat school. 



Cats took over in the last canto and moved on to win 
their first tournament game 55 to 48. Kansas was no 
match in the semifinals, falling 56 to 42. The fast 
moving purple and white giant-killers felled mighty 
Oklahoma A and M 50 to 43 to win the championship. 
Sportsmen took a look at the week's basketball results 
and were amazed to find that K-State had beaten four 
of the nation's top teams. 




BILL THUSTON (right) 
played in nearly half of the 
Wildcats' games as a re- 
serve forward. He has two 
more years of competition. 




Big Seven Crowns-Place Fourth in Nation 



"D EFORE departing on their eastern holiday swing, the Cats warmed up 
against Ft. Hays with a ragged 60 to 32 victory. 

Harold Howey with 14 points and Clarence Brannum with 13 led Kansas 
State to a close 47 to 45 decision over tough Canisius College in Buffalo. 

From Buffalo the Cats moved on to Philadelphia to win their tenth straight 
game, beating St. Joseph College, 59 to 44. Jack Dean with 11 counters, 
Brannum with 10 and Rick Harman with eight paced the fast running 
Wildcat crew before the Convention Hall crowd. After the St. Joseph's game, 
Associated Press named K-State the nation's number one team. 

Awed by 18,000 Madison Square Garden fans, the Wildcats had their 
victory string snipped rudely by Long Island University 65 to 47. The 
nervous Mid westerners found themselves trailing 32 to 22 at the half. Over- 
coming the "garden fever" K-State raged back to take a momentary 38 to 36 
lead, but faltered in the stretch. Howey and Howard Shannon with 12 and 
1 1 points respectively led the Wildcat attack. 









TYPICAL OF hustling Rick Harmon's rebounding work was this action 
against St. Joseph's. Howard Shannon (above) was Kansas State's first 
all-America basbetball player as selected by the Helm Foundation. The 



all-Big Seven guard hit all of his last 33 free throws for an unofficial 
national mark. His swift, smooth playing — shooting baskets in mid-air 
— awed Wildcat fans. 





WINFIELD'S CONTRIBUTION 
to K-State basketball was all- 
Big Seven center, Clarence 
Brannum, (top left) and Joe 
Thornton (right). Brannum's 
last-second heave beat Mis- 
souri, and his free throw edged 
Kansas at Lawrence. Thornton 
was the squad humorist and 
spark plug in tight places. 




"Cinderella Kids" Show Fast 



The Wildcats opened their conference campaign 
with a 65 to 5 1 victory over Colorado in Nichols gym. 
The first half was all K-State. With their fast break 
working perfectly, the Wildcats moved out to a com- 
manding 37 to 13 intermission lead. The second 
period was dominated by the Buffs. They poured in 
38 points to 28 for Kansas State. The cold Wildcats 
went 11 minutes before scoring their first field goal 
of the second half. Rick Harman was high scorer for 
Kansas State with 16 points. 

After leading only 24 to 22 at the half, the Cats 
turned on their famed speed to run away from a stub- 
born Iowa State team 61 to 42 at Manhattan. The K- 
State scoring column was divided equally between five 
men. Jack Dean, Howard Shannon and Lloyd Krone 
netted nine points. Howey got eight and Harman 
seven. 

All around the conference, the basketball critics were 
starting to agree that K-State was championship bound. 



THE WILDCATS opened their bid for Big Seven honors with a 65 to 
51 triumph over Colorado in Nichols gym. 







Performance at Mid-Season 



The Drake Bulldogs came to Manhattan for a non- 
conference contest. After a close, cold first half paced 
by Jack Dean's accurate two handed shooting, the 
Cats ran on to a 56 to 45 triumph. 

Road trip victories over Nebraska and Colorado 
moved the Wildcats up to first place in the conference 
race from which they were never dislodged for the 
remainder of the season. 

Kansas State was near perfect in its 64 to 45 Neb- 
raska win. The Wildcats hit nearly 45 percent of their 
field goal attempts. Harman came in with 12 points, 
Shannon 11, and Howey nine. 

At Boulder, the Wildcats met a greatly improved 
club in their second game of the season with the Buffs. 
With Clarence Brannum leading the way with 14 
points, the Cats came through with a narrow 50 to 44 
victory over the Rocky Mountain outfit. 

Wildcat players came home with a warning that 
Colorado would be the toughest team in the league in 
the future. They were. 



AFTER A TIGHT first half, the Cats pulled away to whip Iowa State at 
Manhattan 61 to 42 for its second conference win. 




LLOYD KRONE (above; played 
n all of the Cat's games. He 
did a great job of rebounding 
against K. U. at Lawrence. 
Bob Lewis (left) broke into 
three games as a sophomore. 



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Wildcats Blow Hot and Cold In 




JACK DEAN (top left) was a dependable 
defensive and floor man. He found his 
basket eye in post season games to give 
the Cats a boost in NCAA play. Despite 
the presence of Clark and Brannum, Ken 
Mahoney (right) broke into more than 
half of Wildcat games as a center. 




The inconsistent Missouri Tigers had a torrid night 
beating Kansas State at Columbia in a 48 to 46 thriller. 
It was the Wildcats' second loss of the season. Jumping 
Dan Pippin couldn't miss the basket as he pocketed 
24 Missouri points. At one point in the last half the 
Tigers had a 39 to 27 edge. Howard Shannon hit 13 
K-State points and sparked the late drive which nearly 
brought victory. 

Oklahoma threw the conference race wide open with 
its thrilling 49 to 47 victory in Nichols. Lefty Paul 
Courty, who sifted 20 points for the Sooner's, hit the 
winning basket from outside the free throw circle with 
six seconds remaining after Hal Howey had just tied 
the score at 47 all with a free throw. Ward Clark, 
reserve center, racked 10 points to pace the Wildcats. 
Both teams were cold at the free throw line with Okla- 
homa hitting 13 of 24 flips and Kansas State 13 of 22. 
Clarence Brannum played a superb defensive game. 

The fans, packed into Nichols Gymnasium were kept 
jumping throughout the game, which brought the first 
taste of defeat to K-Staters on their own boards. 



THE OKLAHOMA SOONERS was the only team to beat Kansas State at Man- 
hattan. Courty's one handed last second shot beat the Cats 49 to 47. 




Jayhawk and Missouri Clashes 



It was a big night February 18 in Nichols gym. The 
Wildcats smeared the Kansas Jayhawks 48 to 29 to 
increase their lead in the conference. But even more 
important to the students the first taste of revenge 
against talkative Dr. "Phog" Allen, K.U. coach who 
raised the question of Clarence Brannum's eligibility, 
was satisfied. 

K.U. tried a stalling type of offense early in the 
game. The ball-controlling Jayhawkers shot at the 
hoop only three times the first half. Kansas State 
played along at the K.U. tempo and left the floor with 
a 14 to 9 lead. After the rest period the Wildcats 
began running, and K.U., before hardly knowing what 
had happened, found itself far behind. The Birds 
went 10 minutes of the second half before scoring their 
first field goal. Harman led the scoring with 13 points. 
Shannon, while limiting Otto Schnellbacher, star K.U. 
forward to six points, contributed 10 points to the Cat 
scoring ledger. 



THE MISSOURI GAME at Manhattan was featured by three baskets in 
the last 12 seconds. Brannum's last second goal gave the Cats a 
55 to 53 victory. 



RICK HARMAN was the conference's 
most promising sophomore. He was 
chosen on several all-conference 
teams. Hard working Rick finished 
second in team scoring. Bob Johnson 
(below) played in two games, shot 
twice and scored two goals. 









Purple and White Players Scrap for 



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SPEEDY GUARD Al Langton 
played in all Kansas State 
games. Most of his 92 points 
came at crucial moments. 
Langton was one of the fastest 
men in the nation. 



T7~ ANSAS STATE traveled to Ames to take its sixth 
conference victory from Iowa State by a narrow 
55 to 49 margin. 

When Missouri came north for the second meeting 
with K-State, the game turned out to be one of the most 
exciting contests in Manhattan in years. The hectic 55 
to 53 win on Clarence Brannum's late one-hander 
moved the K-Staters farther out in front of the con- 




ference pack. 

As in the contest earlier in the season at Columbia, 
the Cats again found themselves trailing Missouri at 
the half. They came back strong the second period 
with Harman spearheading the drive to go into a 26 to 
25 lead. The Tigers caught fire and went back into the 
driver's seat where they stayed until Brannum put K- 
State ahead again 5 1 to 5 with two minutes remaining. 

Missouri tied the score on a free throw. During the 
last 1 2 seconds, three field goals were made at opposite 
ends of the floor. Howard Shannon started it off with 
a neat pivot shot, from the side putting K-State back in 
front 53 to 51. But the smooth Pippin came back to 
knot the count with a long one-hander from just inside 
the center line. His goal cut the net with four seconds 
showing on the clock. 

With an overtime period almost certain, the Cats 
grabbed the ball out of bounds, raced down the court 
with Brannum shooting his goal a split second before 
the gun went off. The perfect shot, in the air before 
the gun went off, barely rustled the cords. 



"PHOG'S" STALL backfired at Manhattan as the Wildcats thrashed 
K. U. 48 to 29. Jack Bell (below) saw little action but added rebound- 
ing strength when in the game. 




Narrow-Margin Victories Over League Teams 



TT TOOK three substitutes teaming with regulars How- 
ard Shannon and Rick Harman to turn back a speedy 
Nebraska team in Nichols. During the first half, the 
Huskers used a fast break to roll to a 28 to 18 lead. 
For the first time during the season, Coach Jack Gardner 
broke up his regular five to start a second half. 

Dave Weatherby, senior forward, scored 10 points 
to wind up his home playing career. Relief guard Al 
Langton sifted 10 and sub center Ward Clark banged 
in eight to help pull the Cats out of the fire in their 
last home game of the season. Harman was high scorer 
with 14 points. The scrappy forward played a brilliant 
floor and rebounding game. Shannon scored 10 points 
and played a top defensive game. 

Clarence Brannum's free throw in the closing seconds 
of the K.U. game at Lawrence gave Kansas State its 
first basketball championship in 29 years. The toss 
culminated one of the greatest second half comebacks 
in the history of Kansas State basketball. The Wildcats 
were seemingly hopelessly behind 32 to 16 at the half. 
Shannon, Harman and Weatherby sparked the late 
rally. 

JACK DEAN drives in to poke at the basket against the hapless Jay 
hawkers. Jerry Patrick (below) saw little service, but was a scrapper 
when in the game. 




UP- 



WARD LEE CLARK was 
good enough to play reg- 
ular if Brannum hadn't 
been around. He played 
in every game, and 
turned into one of 
Gardner's best replace- 
ments. 




With an NCAA playoff bid already in its pocket, 
Kansas State closed its regular season by dropping a 
56 to 52 game to Oklahoma at Norman. 

Clarence Brannum and Howard Shannon were unan- 
imous choices on most all-conference selections. Har- 
man and Howey were prominently mentioned on many 
first and second team choices. Shannon went on to 
win all-American recognition. 





Basketeers Push Through NCAA 



time during the season, 43 to 34. Kansas State never 
relinquished the lead, and the Pokes were able to tie 
the score but twice early in the contest. 

Favored in the western NCAA playoffs at Kansas 
City, the Cats easily moved past Wyoming 58 to 48 in 
the first game. But Baylor's Bears won the right to 
meet Kentucky in the New York finals by coming from 
behind in a great last half to beat Kansas State 59 to 52. 



DAVE WEATHERBY, the only 
senior on the squad, was the 
first four-letter basketball player 
in modern K-State history. He 
sparked last half attacks against 
Nebraska and Kansas. 



XT' ANSAS STATE met Oklahoma A and M in a play- 
off game at Kansas City to determine the fifth 
district NCAA representative. Paced by Shannon with 
16 points, the Cats threw the Cowboys for the second 



The Wildcats lost third place in NCAA play 60 to 
54 Holy Cross at Madison Square Garden. The Cru- 
saders used a fast break more effectively than any pre- 
vious Wildcat opponent to roll to a 36 to 24 halftime 
margin. Kansas State won the favor of the New York 
crowd by putting on a determined second half drive 
which fell just short of victory. 

Early in the season, until the victory run was broken 
by L.I.U., the Cats ranked first among the nation's 
teams. During the past two seasons, Kansas State has 
won 24 of 30 non-conference games. 



HARD MOMENTS were given the Cats by the Nebraska Cornhuskers 
until late in the second half. Rick Harman scored 13 points during the 



last half drive. The Huskers went down for the second time in succession 
against the hard-hitting Wildcat crew which won 56 to 49. 



"• ,\- 



\f*m\ 




Playoffs To Take Second in West 



Fred "Tex" Winters, freshman basketball coach, 
built one of the best freshman aggregations in K-State HAL HOWEY, high 
basketball history. The frosh gave the varsity a close 

veloped into an out- 
game in a mid-season exhibition. Outstanding future standing team player. 

varsity prospects include Ernie Barrett, Ed Head, Walt While playing a brilliant 
Way and Jack Stone. floor game ' Howey found 

time to end year as 
team's third high scorer. 





Season'i 


Record 




Kansas State 


52 


Rockhurst 


37 


Kansas State 


55 


Culver-Stockton 


34 


Kansas State 


75 


Texas Christian 


17 


Kansas State 


61 


Indiana 


53 


Kansas State 


55 


Oklahoma 


48 


Kansas State 


56 


Kansas 


42 


Kansas State 


50 


Oklahoma A and M 


43 


Kansas State 


60 


Ft. Hays 


32 


Kansas State 


47 


Canisius 


45 


Kansas State 


59 


St. Joseph's 


44 


Kansas State 


47 


Long Island 


65 


Kansas State 


65 


Colorado 


51 


Kansas State 


61 


Iowa State 


42 


Kansas State 


56 


Drake 


45 


Kansas State 


64 


Nebraska 


45 


Kansas State 


50 


Colorado 


44 


Kansas State 


46 


Missouri 


48 







Kansas State 


47 


Oklahoma 


49 


Kansas State 


48 


Kansas 


29 


Kansas State 


55 


Missouri 


53 


Kansas State 


54 


Iowa State 


48 


Kansas State 


56 


Nebraska 


49 


Kansas State 


61 


Kansas 


60 


Kansas State 


52 


Oklahoma 


56 


Kansas State 


43 


Oklahoma A and M 


34 


Kansas State 


58 


Wyoming 


48 


Kansas State 


52 


Baylor 


59 


Kansas State 


54 


Holy Cross 


60 



THE BEST FUTURE PROSPECTS in years were members of the 1947-48 
freshman team. Left to right — fop row: Coach Fred "Tex" Winters, Don 
Rogers, Henry Speck, Ed Head, Bernard Williams, Bill Klabau. Second 



row: Dick Johnson, Bill Dresser, Walter Way, Glenn Channel, Jack Stone, 
Ernie Barrett, captain; Milt Boznac. Front row. Dan Upson, Bill Boner, 
Bill Boldenow, Norman Mortimer, Buddy Tomlins, Don Button. 





Competition Tough 

A LTHOUGH coming through with a better record 
than in 1946, the Cat tennis team could win but 
four of 11 meets. In conference play, "Cooney" Moll's 
netmen downed Nebraska, and outside the loop they 
defeated Emporia State twice and Iowa Preflight. They 
finished in fifth place in the conference standing. 



1947 Tennis Results 



Kansas State 2 

Kansas State 7 

Kansas State 1 

Kansas State 6 

Kansas State 5 

Kansas State 1 

Kansas State 5 

Kansas State 

Kansas State 

Kansas State 

Kansas State 1 



Washburn 5 

Emporia State 

Kansas 6 

Emporia State 1 

Nebraska 2 

Iowa State 6 

Iowa Preflight 2 

Oklahoma 7 

Kansas 7 

Missouri 7 

Washburn 6 



SERVING A HOT ONE across at an opponent is Louis Thompson, ten- 
nis number one man. Thompson started the season in third place, but 
moved to the top position after the first two meets. 



In the first Emporia State meet, Louis Thompson, 
Dick Powers, Ray Robbins and Marvin Dungan won 
the singles, and the combinations of Roy Sherrell- 
Powers and Robbins-Jim Neumann copped the doubles 
to give the Wildcats a 7-0 whitewash over Emporia. 



COACH C. S. "COONEY" MOLL demontrates the proper way to 
change from a forehand to backhand grip. Watching from left to right 
are lettermen Louis Thompson, Roy Sherrell, Jim Neumann, Ray Robbins 
and Marvin Dungan. Dick Powers was absent when the picture was taken. 




» * * 



In Tennis, Golf 



M. F. "Mike" Ahearn's coaching of the 1947 golf 
team culminated 44 years of successful leadership in 
Kansas State athletic circles. The "grand old man" of 
Wildcat athletics died in February following an ex- 
tended illness. 

The golfers won three, tied one and lost eight meets. 
They finished last in the conference. Jay and Bob Funk 
paced the field in the Cat's l^Vi-SVl victory over 
Washburn. Don Bishop carded low medal in both 
Emporia State meets. The Hornets went down 17V2 
to Vi and 14 to 4. 

1947 Golf Results 



Kansas State 2 

Kansas State 14!/2 

Kansas State 17'/2 

Kansas State 9 

Kansas State 14 

Kansas State 5'/2 

Kansas State 1 

Kansas State Wz 

Kansas State 2 

Kansas State 1 Vz 

Kansas State 2 

Kansas State IVi 



Wichita 16 

Washburn 31/2 

Emporia State Vi 

Wicihta 9 

Emporia State 4 

Kansas 12Vi 

Nebraska 17 

Iowa State I6V2 

Oklahoma 16 

Kansas I6V2 

Missouri 1 6 

Washburn I6V2 




MIKE AHEARN TALKS to the last of his Kansas State teams before 
a golf meet at the Manhattan Country Club. Listening are Bob Funk, 
Jay Funk, Roland Case and Don Bishop. Ahearn, one of the greatest 
sporting figures in the Midwest, died in February. 



DOWN THE MIDDLE of the fairway go the balls walloped by Jay 
Funk. Jay and brother Bob teamed together in the doubles most of the 
season. 








COACH LUD FISER gives his assistant and catcher Larry Gryskiewicz 
last minute instructions and wishes him luck before a game at Griffith 
Field. 



OUTFIELD COMBINATIONS were picked by Fiser from this group. 
Left to right the flychasers are Gabe Bartley, Bob Ives, Al Sheriff, Keith 
Thomas and Dave Bremner. 



Bats Boom for 16 Wins 

"CROM the largest turnout in Kansas State baseball 
history, the new diamond skipper, Coach Lud Fiser, 
built a club that successfully smashed its way through 
16 of 22 games to third place in conference standings. 
More than 170 aspirants answered the first call for 
practice. 

The Wildcats bested Oklahoma A and M 6 to 5 in 1 1 
innings south of the Kansas border, in the first game 
of the season. Jack Dean hurled an eight-hit master- 
piece, shutting out the Cowboys in the last nine frames. 
The Okies evened the series the following day when 
they battered three K-State pitchers for an 18 to 10 
decision. 

The bats boomed against Oklahoma City University 
to the tune of a 10 to 3 triumph. Dana Atkins and 
Dave Bremmer paced the 11 -hit attack with home runs. 

The most resounding victory of the trip came at the 
expense of the Oklahoma Sooners. Wildcat hitters 
combed Oklahoma pitching for 17 safeties to give 
pitcher, Jack Dean, his second win, 20 to 6. 





THE KANSAS STATE INFIELD (above) during the 1947 season was a brilliant one. Left to right they are Larry Gryskieficz, catcher, Dale Carr, 
shortstop, Dana Atkins, second baseman, Charlie Kerr, first baseman, and Don Chew, catcher. The left field bleacherites show their approval as 
the Wildcats rally, (below) 



241 




Good Record on Mound 

y TITRTF.R of the season was Jack Dean, who threw 
five wins and one loss for the best pitching record 
in conference play. Jack Bell, other Wildcat ace, struck 
out 41 conference batters. 



Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 
Kansas 



.'■'' WzZSmgm 



PITCHING ACES, Jack Bell, (left) and Jack Dean discuss the oppos- 
ing hitters. Dean owned the best won-loss record in the conference (five 
and one). Bell struck out 41 conference batters. 



State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 

State 
State 

State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
State 
Sttae 
State 
State 



Seasons Record 

.. 6 Oklahoma A. & M 5 

10 Oklahoma A. & M 18 

.10 Oklahoma City U 3 

20 Oklahoma 6 

- 8 Kansas 9 

.. 2 Kansas 3 

- 7 Kansas Wesleyan 1 

.. 4 Missouri 2 

. 4 Missouri 3 

.. 1 Kansas Wesleyan 

.15 Washburn 2 

12 Kansas 10 

. 3 Kansas 1 

. 4 Nebraska 5 

.. 8 Nebraska 4 

.13 Washburn 3 

.23 Ft. Riley 5 

Missouri 2 

.10 Iowa State 6 

.. 1 Iowa State 2 

.11 Colorado 9 

.. 9 Colorado 3 



IRATE MISSOURI TIGERS emphasize their disapproval of the um- 
pire's decision as Dana Atkins, Wildcat second baseman rubs his bat 
handle and listens. 



j " ' ■ :;:> - 



• 




242 




AL SHERIFF, hard-swinging Wildcat 
outfielder (above), lays the wood to a 
pitcher's offering. He hit .310 for the 
season. Charlie Kier (left) first base stal- 
wart, awaits a pick-off throw from the 
mound, but the Missourian beats it in. 



Bow to K*TJL in Play at Lawrence 



' I 'HE CATS played their two worst games of the 
season against Kansas at Lawrence. The Jayhawkers 
took advantage of sloppy Kansas State defensive play 
to take both ends of a twin bill, 9 to 8, and 3 to 2. 

K.U. went into an early lead in the opener, scoring 
two runs after two men were out in the second inning. 

K-State came back with five tallies in the third. 
Chew singled home two runs, and scored with Atkins 
on Charlie Kier's triple. Kier scored on Al Sheriff's hit. 

The Wildcats increased their lead in the fourth 
frame when Atkins scored on a K.U. error after tripling 
Bartley home. Atkins added the last run in the sixth 
inning. The fiery second baseman hit for the fourth 
straight time, stole second, moved to third on a wild 
pitch and scored on an outfield fly. 

Forges Ahead 

Meanwhile, K.U. scored four times in its part of the 
fifth inning, again after two were out. They tied the 



count at 8-8 in the sixth, using two Cat errors. The 
Hawks punched across the clincher in the last inning 
with a hit, stolen base, sacrifice and another hit. 

Big Jack Bell pitched four-hit ball for the Cats in 
the finale, but his faltering mates handed K.U. three 
runs. In the last inning, with K-State leading 2 to 1, 
the Hawks used two hits and three errors to score twice. 

The Wildcats whipped Kansas Wesleyan 7 to 1 in 
their home debut. The sluggers pounded out five extra- 
base hits, headlined by the home runs of Keith "Kite" 
Thomas and Charlie Kier and Al Sheriff's screaming 
triple. Four hurlers limited the Coyotes to four scattered 
blows. 

Duane Holder was credited with the Coyote win, his 
second of the season. He pitched the first three innings 
allowing no hits and no runs. Bill Springer followed 
Holder for three innings, Al Fillmore took over for two 
and Bob McClure worked the ninth. A capacity crowd 
of 2,000 people saw the night game. 



243 




TOP RELIEF PITCHERS were Al Fillmore (left) and Bernie Zawatski. 
Fillmore, a fireball thrower, rounded into shape late in the season. 
Zawatski is remembered for his brilliant relief role against Nebraska. 
Each won two, lost none. 



DANA ATKINS, hustling second baseman (below), moves around third 
to score against the Jayhawks. Atkins hit .300 in the conference and 
fielded .912. 



Trounce Tigers Here and 

T> OUNCING back into the Big-Six title race, the Cats 
trimmed Missouri 4 to 2 and 4 to 3 at Manhattan. 
The double win moved them into a tie with Oklahoma 
and Nebraska for the league lead. 

Jack Dean set the Tigers down in the first game 
with six hits, notching his third pitching triumph. The 
Missourians utilized the lean hurler's early wildness to 
score once in the first and again in the second inning. 

Run for One 

K-State got one back in its half of the second canto 
on some wild base running. Sheriff reached first on 
an error. He went all the way home when the Tiger 
second baseman took the shortstop's toss, missed the 
bag and threw wild to first base on an attempted double 
play. 

Larry Gryskiewicz drove two runs home with a 
fourth inning single, and Sheriff singled Thomas across 
in the eighth to end the scoring. 

Jack Bell tossed the second victory for the hustling 
Staters. Charlie Kier's home run with Don Chew 
aboard in the fourth inning highlighted the tight battle. 




Revenge Jayhawk Defeat 

Kansas Wesleyan was edged 1 to in a return en- 
gagement at Salina. Brilliant fielding sparked the play 
of both teams. K-State scored its run in the sixth inning 
on Dave Bremner's double and Dale Carr's single. 

The Cats traveled to Topeka and took Washburn 
University by a 1 5 to 2 count. For all its scoring K-State 
tabbed the Ichabod staff for only 10 hits, but 16 Wash- 
burn errors turned the night into a comedy. Dana 
Atkins led the swatters with two hits in six trips. 
Bremner banged a triple and Thomas doubled for the 
only extra-base hits. 

Revenge for the waiting Wildcats was granted when 
K.U. invaded Manhattan. The Hawks were dumped 
12 to 10 and 3 to 1. 

Lead In Ninth 

In the first game, the Cats went into the last chucker 
with a seven run lead, but nearly blew it when the Birds 
counted five times on three hits and two errors. 

Dependable Jack Dean was credited with the win, 
however, Bill Springer had to go to his aid in the ninth 
inning to squelch the uprising Hawks. 

Jayhawker batsmen were at the mercy of Jack Bell 
in the second game. The righthander whiffed 12 and 
yielded but 3 safeties. In the fifth inning, the Wildcats 
went after a precious run the hard way. Atkins singled 
went to third on a bunt and went home on Chew's 
squeeze tap. The wins kept the Cats on the tail of the 
Missouri Tigers, who had batted into the conference 
lead. 



LARRY GRYSKIEWICZ (top) and the Kansas University catcher are 
uninterested as the Hawk coach Vic Bradford, illustrates the inferred in- 
fraction. Charlie Kier stretches for a throw (second from top) that beats 
the K. U. runner by steps. Captain Kier and the Nebraska first baseman 
look to rightfield (second from bottom) where Kier's hit falls safely. 
Kier was K-State's home run king. Duane Holder scampers into third 
base against Nebraska (bottom). 




•-:*»•*, 



• 



245 




WILDCAT CATCHER, Larry Gryskiewicz, (above) kneels 
for a throw as an Iowa State runner scores. It was a sparkling 
Iowa State victory that knocked the Cats from first place in 
the conference. 



Jack Bell says, "This gate's closed, son!" (left). The big 
pitcher puts the ball to his mound rival in a collision at home 



plate. 



Wildcats Set Back as Huskers Win One 



"XTEBRASKA Cornhuskers moved into Manhattan 
for a two-game stand right behind K.U. The 
Huskers dealt the pennant-reaching Cats a severe set- 
back when the took the first game 5 to 4. K-State came 
back with an 8 to 4 decision the following day. 

The Nebraskans hammered a worn-out Kansas State 
mound staff for 14 hits in the opener. "Kite" Thomas 
blasted a home run in the first inning to give the 
Wildcats an early lead. 

Jack Dean started on the hill in the finale, but was 
off form with just two days rest after his K.U. stint. 
Bernie Zawatski took over in the fifth and shut the 
Huskers out for the last four rounds. Offensively, it 
was Dale Carr day. The hustling shortstop hit two 
home runs. Atkins drove two mates across with a 
triple and a single. 



Rout Two Teams 

K-State played host to Washburn and Ft. Riley in 
two successive night games. Both contests turned into 
routs, and were finished before nearly empty stands. 
Washburn went down 13 to 3 and Ft. Riley bowed 
23 to 5. Kier homered twice in the Washburn game. 
Ted Grimes smacked two round-trippers against the 
soldiers, one in the sixth inning when the Cats tallied 
1 1 times. 

In the all-important battle at Columbia against Mis- 
souri, K-State went under 2 to 0. Both Tiger runs were 
unearned. Jack Bell tossed a neat six-hitter, but couldn't 
get support from his teammates either in the field or 
at the plate. Bell's mound opponent limited the Wild- 
cats to three scant hits, and was helped along by five 
Kansas State errors. 



246 



Finish Season Third 

When the Iowa State Cyclones blew into Manhattan, 
the conference race was tighter than a rain-soaked 
drum. K-State needed victories in both contests to 
figure in the final count. 

Reliable Jack Dean pitched the Fisermen to a 10 
to 6 win in the first game. Kier's grand slam homer 
in the first inning highlighted the contest. 

The second game was the season's thriller. The 
Wildcats were behind 2 to 1 when Kier hit, what 
looked to be a certain home run, with one man on 
base in the last of the ninth. Cheers turned to open- 
mouthed amazement when the Cyclone right fielder 
jumped and snatched the drive just over the top of the 
wall. He returned the ball to first base doubling 
Thomas off and ending the game. Instead of on top, 
the Cats wound up in third place in the final standing. 

Whip Buffaloes 

The Wildcats entertained Colorado University for 
two games to close their successful season. The Buf- 
faloes went down 11 to 9 and 9 to 3. 

Four pitchers saw service for the Cats in the first 
game. The slabmen were never pressed as their slug- 





KV 




GA6E BARTLEY, speedy centerfielder, scores against Colorado. Dana 
Atkins is signaling "stand up". 



ging mates rang out 14 hits. 

Al Fillmore, lanky fireballing righthander, held 
the Buffs to five hits in the season's finale. Al Sheriff 
collected three hits in four times at bat, one being a 
home run. 

Three regulars hit .300 or better for conference play. 
Don Chew came through with .333, Kier with .317 
and Dana Atkins an even .300. Kier, who was elected 
honorary captain, drove 15 runs in during conference 
games. The speedy Cats pilfered 29 bases in 12 loop 
tilts. 



1947 BASEBALL SQUAD— Back row: Bernie Zawatski, Al Fillmore, 
Keith Chadd, Jack Bell, Don Chew, Ray Holder, Lud Fisher, Coach. 
Second row: Robert Baker, Derrill Bartley, Bob Ives, Keith Thomas, 



Duane Holder, Loren Blazer, John Ward. Front row: David Fisher, 
mascot; Dale Carr, Jack Dean, Charles Kier, Dana Atkins, Dave 
Bremner, Al Sheriff, Larry Gryskiewicz, David Pfeutze, mascot. 







.' * £ 




1947 TRACK SQUAD— Back row: Louis Akers, Bill Payne, Jim Seay, 
Ward Haylett, Coach, Donald Harr, Richard Hanson, Carmen Wilcox, 
Clarence Williams, Bill Harris, Edwin Darden. Second row: Jim 
Danielson, Earl Elliott, Bernard Buck, George Leasure, David Van- 



hauerbeke, Don Borthwick, George Sherman, Lawrence King, C. J. 
Thornton. Front row: Frederick Bennett, Bob Johnson, Rollin Prather, 
Art Hildenbrand, Bill Bond, Bill Stuart, Rodney McClay, Seth An- 
trim, Harold Kiser, Rick Harman. 



Haylett's Thinclads Place High 



COACH WARD HAYLETT, right, confers with his assistant last 
season, Ed Darden, former hurdle star. Haylett completed his twentieth 
year as track tutor at K-State this season. 




TZ"ANSAS State's 1947 outdoor track team won two 
^of four dual meets, placed high in the Texas Relays, 
Colorado Indoor and Colorado Relays, and culminated 
the regular season by finishing fourth in the conference 
meet. 

During the summer, K-State track men placed third 
in the Missouri Valley AAU meet, although they were 
not representing the College. Rollin Prather starred 
in the June Big Six Southwest Conference meet by 
winning firsts in the discus and shotput. He threw the 
discus 153 feet and the shot 53 feet, 2Vz inches — the 
best toss of his career to date. Later he won second in 
the discus in the National Collegiate meet at Salt Lake 
City with a throw of 155 feet, a new school record. 

Coach Ward Haylett's thinclads impressively opened 
the season with the Texas Relays at Austin. The Wild- 
cats ranked sixth among the 17 teams competing. 
Prather won scoring honors for all competitors, winning 
first in the shot put and first in the discus. 

248 



Prather Stars for Cats 



'"TpHE WILDCATS surpassed their Texas showing at 
the Colorado Indoor meet. Again Prather was the 
stand-out. He threw the shot 5 1 feet, 3 Va inches and 
whirled the discus 147 feet, 5 inches for new meet 
records. Harold Kiser covered 23 feet, 4 1 /? inches to 
win the broad jump and set a new Kansas State record. 
George Sherman tied for first in the pole vault, and 
Stuart and Hildenbrand finished first and second respec- 
tively in the 880 yard run. Team scores were not kept, 
but Kansas State unofficially copped second place. 

Stalled By Aggies 

The Oklahoma A. and M. Cowboys beat the Wild- 
cats 87 Vi to 43 V2 in a dual meet at Stillwater. Prather 
smashed the meet record with his toss of 153 feet with 
the discuss, won the shotput and placed third in the 
javelin. Al Langton tied for first in the high jump and 
Kiser won the broad jump for other top K-State per- 
formances. 

At the K.U. Relays, Prather won second in the shot- 
put and third in the discus for the best Wildcat show- 
ing. Rodney McClay tied with six others for first in 
the pole vault, Bill Payne finished fifth in the decath- 
alon and the spring medly team took fourth. 



ROLLIN PRATHER promises to become a great weight man (top,). He was the season's 
high scorer and set a new Kansas State discus record at 155 feet when he won second 
in the NCAA meet at Salt Lake City. Don Harr (top right) was a valuable distance run- 
ner. Jim Danielson (middle) scored his share of points in the broad jump. Bill Payne 
(lower right) was a high jumper on the Wildcat outdoor team. He placed fifth in the 
decathalon at the K.U. Relays. Rodney McClay, second from left, starred in the hurdles, 
dashes and pole vault (bottom,). He tied B:g Six records in the 220 lows against Iowa State. 





Win Second in Relays 

For the second successive season the Wildcats finished 
second in the nine-school Colorado Relays. Prather 
again was the star. He shattered the meet record in 
winning the discus, 147 feet, 5 inches, and also won 
the shotput. Joe Thornton topped the 120 high hurdles 
field and Kiser won the broad jump. The mile relay 
team placed second. 




JIM SEAY, left and Don Borthwick were among the best in the long 
distance runs (top) Seth Antrim passes the baton to Bill Stuart in a 
relay against Wichita (middle). Art Hildenbrand (lower left) was a 
"find" in the 880 last spring. George Leasure (bottom) rated high 
among long distance stars. 



K.U. swamped K-State 86 to 45 in a dual meet at 
Lawrence, but the individual star was a Wildcat. Rod 
McClay took a first in the 100 yard dash, skimmed the 
220 yard lows for another first and tied for the top 
position in the pole vault. Prather was close behind 
with first in the shotput and the discus. 

250 







Whip Wichita Here 

TN THEIR only home meet of the season, the Cats 
whipped Wichita University 107 5/6 to 23 1/6. 
McClay and Prather tied for high point honors with 
three firsts apiece. Wichita's only first was a tie in the 
high jump. 

The Iowa State Cyclones fell 85 to 46 to the Wild- 
cats in a dual at Ames. McClay flew over the 220 yard 




BERNARD BUCK, left, was a freshman sensation in the 880 (top 1 
and Fred Bennet aided the Wildcat relay teams. The mile relay team 
of Carmen Wilcox, Seth Antrim, Rick Harman and Bill Stuart (middle) 
turn the oval in a tune-up before a meet. Harold Kiser (far right) 
broke the school broad jump record. David Van Hauerbeke (bottom] 
has few peers as a two-miler. 

timbers in 23.8 seconds to tie the Big Six record. 
Pmher was high scorer with 15 points, followed by 
McClay with 13. 

Missouri won the conference meet. Nebraska was 
second, K.U., third; K-State, fourth; Oklahoma, fifth; 
and Iowa State, sixth. Prather won the shotput and 
garnered second in the discus. McClay was third in 
the century and 220 yard lows, Leasure third in the 
mile and Borthwick third in the two mile. 

251 




JIM BUCK (top) has that "sweet feeling" as he brushes the tape in 
the Wichita 880. He also won the event in the Iowa State meet. Buck 
was one of Coach Ward Haylett's most reliable performers. 



BILL STUART (middle) goes into the tape first in the 440. 
Stuart won the 880 in the meet with Kansas. He was also a 
member of the Wildcat mile relay team. 



GEORGE SHERMAN (far left) knocks the cross bar 
down in the pole vault event against Wichita. He went 
on to win the event. Sherman tied for first in the pole 
vault against Kansas and won it in the dual with Iowa 
State. 



JOE THORNTON (bottom) was a top hurdle man. He 
won the 120 yard high hurdles at the Colorado Relays. 
A pulled muscle prevented Joe's participation in the 
conference meet. 



, 





RODNEY McCLAY (upper left) was high point maker for the Wildcat varsity. Rollin Prather 
(upper center) set three shotput records for the indoor season this year. Art Hildenbrand (upper 
right), Harold Kiser (middle center), and Bill Stuart (lower left) were instrumental in garnering 
points for the indoor season. 

Individuals Star in Indoor Track 



"^/TO INDOOR facilities, late snows and cold weather gave Kansas 
State's indoor track team little time for workouts before enter- 
ing competition. The Wildcats finished fourth in the Big Seven 
this year. 

Rodney McClay, placing consistently in the low hurdles, dash 
and pole vaulting events, was high scorer for the varsity with 33 
points. McClay won second honors in the low hurdles at the Big 
Seven Indoor Track Meet at Kansas City, Mo. 

Rollin Prather broke three indoor records in the shotput event. 

INDOOR TRACK MEMBERS for this season were back row: Carmen Wilcox, Joe Beebe, Rollin 
Prather. Frpd Brnn^tr, Richard Chase, and Coach Ward Haylett. Second row: Rodney McClay. 
Art Hildenbrand, Robert Hatcher, Don Thomas, Bill Stuart, Leighton Fairbairn, and Leonard 
Sense. Front row: Dick Hanson, Harold Kiser, Earl Elliott, William Bond, David Vanhauerbeke, 
end George Leasure. 





^ .1 W 



253 




Two Wildcat Matmen Win Big 



LEON REYNARD guided 
the Wildcats to fourth 
place in his first year as 
a Kansas State coach. 
A former Kansas State 
mat star and Big Six 
champion in 1938, 1939, 
and 1940. Reynard 
cached at Colby High 
School before returning 
to Kansas State. As a 
captain in the U. S. 
Army, Reynard won the 
Pacific Area All-Service 
Wrestling Tourney. 



TZ" ANSAS STATE'S wrestling team, under their new 
coach, Leon (Red) Reynard, finished the 1948 
season with three wins, one tie and eight losses. The 
team placed fourth in the Big Seven wrestling meet at 
Boulder, Colo. 

Big Six 145 pound champion, Stan Fansher, cap- 
tained the Wildcat grapplers during this season. 

Verle McClellan won the conference crown in the 
136 pound class. 



Kansas State matmen got off to a slow start in the 
1948 season by droping a pair of dual meets to Okla- 
homa University and Oklahoma A and M. The defeat 
at the hands of the Sooners was by a slim 16-14 margin 
and saw the Wildcats give the Sooners some rough 
moments. Hess won his bout by scoring the only fall. 

Captain Fansher was the lone Kansas State winner 
against Oklahoma A and M as the Wildcats were 
soundly defeated 29-3. It was the 52nd consecutive 
win in dual meets for A and M. 

Coach Reynard's Wildcat wrestlers came up with a 
pair of improved performances when they inaugurated 
the 1948 home schedule in Nichols Gymnasium. The 
Wildcats wrestled Colorado State Teachers College to 
a 12-12 tie and then, the following night, pinned 
Colorado University with a 23-3 beating. Charles 
Nighswonger, Verle McClellan, and Joe Blanchard 
turned in victories in both matches. Dean Hess again 
scored the only fall. Verle McClellan and Charles 
Nighswonger wrestled their first matches of the 1948 
season. 



CHARLES NIGHSWONGER has worked his Nebraska University opponent 
into an off-balance position, resulting in a Nighswonger victory and 



Kansas State points. Nighswonger played an important part in the 
Wildcats 1948 season. 




254 



Six Championship Crown 

With Charles Lyons and Joe Blanchard winning 
the final matches of the evening, Kansas State's mat- 
men came through with a thrilling 14-13 victory over 
Colorado A and M in the Wildcats third home engage- 
ment. Kansas State was trailing 13-8 as the 175 pound 
contestants stepped to the mat. Thirty minutes later, 
Lyons and Blanchard had disposed of their foes and 
Kansas State had won 14-13. 

The Wildcat eastern tour resulted in three defeats. 
Ralph Fallwell, 121 pounder, was the only Kansas 
State winner as the Wildcat matmen fell before the 
Navy at Annapolis. The Navy topped the Wildcats by 
a 31-3 score. Kent State was next to deal out a Kansas 
State defeat by a score of 20-6 and powerful Michigan 
State's wrestling squad scored a 27-2 victory over the 
journeying Wildcats. 

The Wildcats interrupted their losing streak by 
defeating Minnesota 14-13 at Minnesota. 



STAN FANSHER (Upper right) captained the 1948 Kansas State wrest- 
ling team. Fansher won the 145-pound Big Seven championship for 
the second consecutive time. VERLE McCLELLAN (Lower left) won the 
Big Seven title in the 136-pound class for the second time in his Kansas 
State career. McClellan won his first Big Six championship in 1940 
while on the same team that "Red" Reynard, Wildcat coach, captained 
to a Big Six victory. McCLELLAN out-decisioned a Colorado University 
foe to ring up additional points for the Wildcats. 






255 





VERNON DALTON (Top left) 
scored a Kansas State victory in 
the Minnesota dual meet. Charles 
Lyons (top middle) and Wayne 
Coltrain (top right) were tough 
customers to handle for their op- 
ponents in varsity competition. 
William Brown (Right center) 
scored early season victories to 
steady the Wildcats in their season 
openers. 



DEAN HESS (Left 
center) scored the 
only falls when the 
Wildcats lost to Ok- 
lahoma and won 
from Colorado Uni- 
versity. Joe Blan- 
che rd ( Bottom left) 
had a good chance 
to win the Big Seven 
heavyweight c h a m- 
pionship but broke 
his leg in his second 
match of that meet. 
Blanchard was a 
consistent winner for 
the Wildcats. 



Fourth in Conference 



Iowa State out decisioned Kansas State at Nichols 
Gym 17-13, and Oklahoma A and M ended the home 
season by crushing the Wildcats with a 29-3 score, 
McClellan winning the only match. 

Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Iowa State, respectively 
topped Kansas State at the Big Seven meet. Verle Mc- 
Clellan and Stan Fansher were the two Big Seven 
champions for Kansas State. Both were second time 
winners. 



256 



Meet Fancy Competition 

QUFFERING a disasterous season, Coach C. S. "Coony" Moll's Kansas 
State swimmers showed lack of experience this year and finished deep 
in the Big Seven cellar. 

A tidal wave hit Kansas State when Texas A. and M. swamped the 
Wildcat tankmen by a 59 to 23 margin in the season opener. The Texans 
put on a brilliant display, capturing first in every event, while establishing 
five new pool records. 

The Wildcats were host to Kansas Universiy and lost by a 48-3 count. 
Kansas State's lone winner was John Leitt in the 60 and 100-yard dashes. 

Kansas State invaded Sooner-land and lost to Oklahoma by a 59-35 
score. 

Colorado University set a 150-yard back stroke pool record when they 
dropped the Wildcats by a 56-28 score. Gillespie was the only Kansas 
State first, winning the 400-yard free style. 

A scant ten points gave the Nebraska swimmers a 47-37 victory over 
Kansas State at Lincoln. Nichols, Leitt, and Gillespie won firsts. 

Journeying to Lawrence, the Wildcats lost their second match to Kansas 
University by a 48-36 total. 

A 67-17 dubbing was given the Kansas State team by Iowa State 
swimmers at Nichols Gym. The Wildcat tankmen lost the final dual 
swimming meet of the season when Nebraska came to Kansas State and 
squeezed by a close 43 to 41 victory. Leitt and Gillespie each won a pair 



H 




JOHN LEITT, JR. led the varsity swimmers in 
points in the 1948 swimming season. Leitt, a 
fast dash man, was the most consistent winner 
of the squad and placed several firsts for the 
Wildcats. 



of events for the only firsts the Wild- 
cats could muster. Iowa State won 
the Big Seven title with Nebraska and 
Oklahoma placing second and third. 



THE VARSITY SWIMMING 
TEAM of the 1948 season. In 
the top row from left to right 
are Coach C. S. Moll, Harold 
Rosenbaum, Stuart Wilder, and 
Claude Lindsey. In the bottom 
row are David Nichols, John 
Leitt Jr., Richard Sigman, Clif- 
ford Heckathorn, and James 
Gillespie. 




257 




2000 Men in Intramurals 



PROF. L P. WASHBURN 
directed expansion of 
Kansas State intramural 
program for the 1947-48 
season. Facilities were 
expanded this season 
and will be expanded 
more next season to all 
students to enter intra- 
collegiate sports. 



TV /TORE thaan 2000 men participated in nine different 
athletic activities on 1947-48 season of intra- 
mural sports at Kansas State. Intramural facilities were 
expanded under the direction of Prof. L. P. Washburn. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon was the all-school winner of last 
year's program. Ten received letter sweaters for being 
the high point men in last year's competition. Letter- 
men were Carl Anderson, Earl Chappell, Harold Hay, 
Marvin Hoffman, Richard Lindbloom, Richard Lill, 
Roy Sherrell, Charles Watkins, John Woolsey and 
John Lindholm. 

In touch football, Greek winner, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 



lost to the Independent Perns for the all-school title. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon topped the Greeks in basketball 
but lost to the Independent Set-Ups for the all-school 
title. 

Harold Price won the Greek horseshoe singles and 
teamed with James Wood to place Alpha Gamma Rho 
the winners. Dale Martin, Jr. AVMA, won the Inde- 
pendent singles. Leonard Jennison and Roy Sherrell, 
Perns, took the doubles. 

Don Dickerson, Delta Tau Delta, won the Greek 
golf championship. Howard Ladd, Perns, was the 
Independent winner. 

Arthur Froog, Independent, won the all-school table 
tennis singles title. Ty Powers and Jim Neumann, Phi 
Delta Theta, were doubles winners. All-school tennis 
singles title was won by Marvin Hoffman, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. 

Beta Theta Pi won the all-school title in volleyball 
by a forfeit game from the Perns. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon scored 58Vi to the Sigma Phi 
Epsilon's 58 points to win the Greek track title. The 
Northwesters won the Independent championship. 

Independent Darkhorses won the all-school softball 
title by beating the Greek winners, Tau Kappa Epsilon. 



BOB MASON AND JOHN LINDHOLM (left) were Independent winners in tennis doubles by defeating BOB EKBLAD AND GUY ALLEN (right) 




258 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON'S touch football team won the Greek championship (upper left). Tau Kappa 
Epsilon's champion soft ball team (upper right). Sigma Alpha Epsilon's Harry Chappell and Dick Lind- 
bloom and the Independent champions Roy Blood and Bill Ketterman won the table tennis doubles in 
the spring (center left). Tau Kappa Epsilon won first honors in track (center right). The Darkhorses 
were the all-school softball champions (lower left). Sigma Phi Epsilon won the Greek basketball cham- 
pionship (right lower center). Just to show both sides of the question (two negatives make it positive), 
Ketterman, Blood, Lindbloom and Chappell won the table tennis doubles (second from bottom). Intra- 
mural golf champion and runner-up (bottom,) were Don Dickerson, (right) Delta Tau Delta and Robert 
Hall (left). Pi Kappa Alpha. 




259 




Take Part in Intramurals 



IN HER SECOND 
YEAR as director of 
women's intramurals, 
Miss Katheryn Mc- 
Kinney acts as su- 
pervisor of the 
sports. She is a pro- 
fessor in the physical 
education depart- 
ment and replaced 
Miss Katherine 

Geyer a year ago. 



A LL WOMEN enrolled in physical education and 
many who are not, may participate in the intra- 
mural program offered by the physical education depart- 
ment. Director of the organized sports is Miss Katheryn 
McKinney, professor of the department. Miss McKinney 
has finished her second season in the head position of 
this activity. 

The sports offered include volley ball, tennis and 
table tennis, posture contests, and swimming in the 
fall. Basketball, softball, modern, social, and ballroom 
dancing and a second tennis tourney follow up in the 
spring season. 

Girls from various organized houses on the campus 



enter the competition. Presentations of awards were 
banned several years ago by the faculty. The original 
intention was to provide enjoyment for the girls, and 
with this basic principle, there is no need for an award. 

The volley ball, swimming, basketball, tennis and 
table tennis tournaments were not finished until late 
in the spring last year. The Blitz Babes, an independent 
group of girls who do not represent any organized 
group, took first place in two sports, volley ball and 
swimming. Clovia won top honors in the basketball 
contest and Merline Nutter walked away with the tennis 
tourney. Mary Hodgson won the table tennis cham- 
pionship from runner-up, Shirley King. 

This fall the Blitz Babes again were tops in the 
volley ball competition. The fall tennis games were 
again won by Merline Nutter, singles, and Dorothy 
Stover and Glendeen Link, Van Zile Hall, the doubles. 
Swimming followed the tennis with Van Zile Hall out 
in front. The winners of the posture contest were: 
Alpha Delta Pi. first; Chi Omega, second; and Pi 
Beta Phi, third. Shirley King took the ping pong title 
in a nip and tuck battle with Mildred Reisner. The 
Kappa Deltas won the basketball championship for 
the year in the late spring. 



A THREE-WAY TIE for first in the annual posture contest showed car- 
riage and poise among women of three social sororities. Two of the 



winners are shown at the bottom, left, Pi Beta Phi, and right, Alpha 
Delta Pi's team. 




260 




Winners in women's intramurals for the year were: top row 
left Beryl Wesche, runner-up and Merline Nutter, winner of 
the spring tennis; center top left, doubles tennis winners in the 
fall Glendeen Link and Dorothy Stover, and fall singles star, 
Merline Nutter; top right fall ping pong runner-up Mildred Reis- 
ner and winner, Shirley King. 

Center left are the winning spring volleyball team, the Blitz 
Babes. Center right is winner of table tennis for spring, Mary 
Hodgson and runner-up, Shirley King. 

Third row left the Van Zile Hall swimming team took top 
honors this spring, and right the women of Clovia walked away 
with first place in basketball for the 1947 spring semester. 

Bottom the third part of the posture tie, the Chi Omega team. 
261 




N 



OW, I may not look very artistic — but don't let appearances fool you. It's hard for a Hill to 
to look artistic, or even intelligent, for that matter. But I have paid my tribute to the Muses — 
and the goddesses of several other activities that some people may not consider art. 



I've got splotches on my grass left by over- zealous scenery painters. And the lost chord is floating 
between the Auditorium and the Gymnasium. Printers' ink dries in the breezes that blow across my 
face in the spring. 

My students put in a lot of time and effort to make me appear cultured, as well as cultivated. 
The ether above me hums with their voices going out over KSAC to the people of the state. The 
rock under me trembles with a burst of song from one of the choirs. The ones who walk on me 
murmur about the news in today's Collegian. And the sheep and cows in my barns bleat and "beller" 
under the kind hands of student judges. 

Opportunities are offered on me to allow anyone with talent to bring his light from under the 
bushel. And those with the enthusiasm, but not the ability, are gently encouraged from pursuing 
their activities on other Hills. 

This year, for the first time, black-shod marching feet pounded across my slopes and gridiron to 
lilting tunes. The Kansas State Marching Band executed fancy figures on my bluegrass, and even in 
my snowdrifts. Choirs raised their voices to the blue skies above me in old hymns, and then took out 

263 



for a week in the state to convince girls and boys that they ought to spend four years on me. 

My dramatists tackled several classics during the nine months — even Shakespeare, and, much to 
my surprise, came out crowned with Thespian laurels. New, modernistic forms of scenic background 
startled and pleased audiences, who roared their approval of the Players' efforts. Hours were spent 
by directors and coaches correcting the tiny mistakes that haunt amateurs. 

Blue and red pencils scratched across the tops of embattled journalistic tables, striving to make an 
art out of the difficult business of producing newspapers and yearbooks. Making layouts, having head- 
lines just the right length, putting out a publication with which both the students and faculty remain 
happy. 

Many of my organizations and departments have publications, widely circulated in their fields. 
For the most part, the people who work on these papers and yearbooks are not journalists profession- 
ally — but the smearing of printers' ink constitutes a pretty good disguise. They put out good, work- 
man-like jobs and, as my administration loves to say, disseminate information among the people. 

If you don't think judging the merits of animals is an art — you are dead wrong (of course, I'm not 
speaking of the beauty queens now). Sheep, cattle, poultry and crops which for the most part are 
raised on me, are all judged by students from the agriculture school. They can tell good forms from 
bad ones. 

But the thing I like best about all this art and talent is that every bit of the time devoted to my 
glory is donated. Students and faculty put in free hours producing something worthwhile in the fields 
of liberal arts, for no pay, no credit, no recompense but the fun they have, and the fun they give to 
me and all my other employees and students. 




264 




The Courtship and Marriage Lecture Series brought outstanding 
medical and religious authorities to the campus. (Top left) among 
these were Dr. Karl A. Menninger, psychiatrist at the Winter General 
Hospital at Topeka, one of the country's top experts, left, and Dr. 
Morris Fishbein, editor of the Journal of the American Medical 
Association. Between them is President Milton S. Eisenhower. Coming 
early in the fall was William Saltiel, former special assistant to the 
United States Attorney General, (top right) at the left of the picture. 
He spoke to an all-College assembly on monopolies and cartels. 
With him are, center, Prof. Luther Leavengood and Dr. Robert A. 
Walker, of the Institute of Citizenship, which sponsored his appear- 
ance. 



NcMxutoi QetewiUi&i ViAit QompAtl 



Brought to the College by the Artist Series were Rudolph Firkusny, pianist, 
(second row, left) and Thor Johnson, conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony 
Orchestra, (second row, right) shown talking with Prof. Luther Leavengood. 
Colonel A. Potter (second from bottom) explained the Tuttle Creek dam project 
to engineers early in the year. John B. Hughes (bottom) former war correspondent 
and commentator addressed an assembly on the dangers of a third World War. 



265 




Play Is Spring Success 



I TNDER the able direction of Prof. Earl G. Hoover, the Kansas 
State Players successfully stage three plays each year. Student 
directors, stage hands, and prop people give much-needed help. 

The Players' spring (1947) production of Rudolph Beiser's The 
Barretts of Wimpole Street, was said to have been the best play ever 
presented in the College auditorium. 

The role of Elizabeth Barrett climaxed the last performance of 
Kathleen Kerr. Dale Berger and Craig Bracken were other stand-bys 
for whom the play rang down the final curtain on the Kansas State 
stage. 

Other cast members were Marvin Altman, Rebecca Lamoreaux, 
Joline Nelson, Rosemary Leonard, Bob Kelly, Dick Morse, Richard 
Griffing, Eugene Fieldhammer, Rodney Beaver, De Vere Nelson, Betty 
Carr, Max Hollinger, William Rossiter, Joe Adams. 



MAKING A HIT of tough plays, seems to be right down the alley of 
Prof. Earl G. Hoover (above) director for the Kansas State Players. 
Kathleen Kerr and Craig Bracken stir the audience with one of the 



delicate speeches from The Barretts of Wimpole Street, (below) pre- 
sented in the spring of 1947. 



■ 




266 




With a fun-loving, if inexperienced, 
troup of student actors and actresses, the 
summer production of Jean Kerr's "Our 
Hearts Were Young and Gay" was pre- 
sented on July 25. 

The two lead parts, Cornelia Otis Skin- 
ner and Emily Kimbrough, were expertly 
portrayed by Shirley King and Louise 
Beim, attractive members of the Kansas 
State Players. 

The play concerned the adventures of 
two young ladies enroute to Paris — on a 
different ship than that taken by their 
parents. The student version of the whole 
situation was a source of amusement for 
all. 



Give Summer Comedy 



Although Miss King was a newcomer among the 
players, she portrayed the part of Cornelia Skinner like 
a veteran. She appeared — in accordance with the role — 
absolutely brainless. 

Miss Beim was a natural for the part of Emily Kim- 
brough, a farcing and frivolous type of role which in 
order to be effective had to be either a complete success 
or a dismal failure. The author himself could have 
imagined no more frivolous 
character than Miss Beim's 
Emily. 

Other members of the cast 
included: David Meier, Mar- 
garet Reuter, Dan Clark, Rich- 
ard Griffing, Betty Dickinson, 
Ross Miller, Max Hollinger, 
Lois Noland, Dorothy Krey, 
John Bascom, Nels Anderson, 
Frances Jewett, Joan Yearwood, 
Bil Anderson and John Sjo. 




Cornelia and Emily dis- 
cuss their dramatic skills 
with Monsieur de la Croix 
(top left). Shirley King as 
Cornelia is at the right, 
with Louise Beim and Bill 
Anderson. An embarassing 
moment on shipboard oc- 
curs (center). At the bot- 
tom, the family congre- 
gates to un-hatch the whole 
plot in the third act. 



267 




PART OF THE CAST of Twelfth Night in a scene from the play are 
left to right Inez Strutt, Catherine Merrill, Ivan Rundus and Joline 
Nelson. Other members of the cast were Bob Kelly, Marvin Altman, Bill 
Rossiter, Garth Grissom, Wolfram Wolz, Richard Tesche, Bob McCaust- 



land, Carl Kish, Harold Dutton, Bob Farmer, Ted Farmer, Max Hollinger, 
Alice Dawson, Dee Taylor, Jason Spinnett, John Haines, Joe Adams and 
Bob Kaspar. 



Dramatists Plunge into Shakespeare 



Never before in the history of Kansas State Col- 
lege has a group of Players attempted a Shakespearian 
play. Director Hoover announced last fall that the first 
play of the season would be "Twelfth Night". 

HOURS AND ARTISTRY that make each play a success are provided by 
the stage and property crews who paint, pound nails, gather equipment 



On November 14, a group of 22 determined players 
proved that they were capable of such an undertaking 
when they presented the drama to a large but critical 
audience. 

and hope the finished product looks like the idea in mind. Members of 
the crew work on the new type of setting used in Twelfth Night. 




268 



Present "Pygmalion 



As something entirely different in scenery and atmos- 
phere characteristics the Kansas State Players' spring 
production of Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw left 
little to be desired. 

Pygmalion is the story of one man, Henry Higgins, 
henpecked by his housekeeper, and kept a social un- 
touchable by his mother. His genius in phonetics forces 
him to deal with all of mankind as if it were an animal 
in one great scientific experiment. Garth Grissom 
moved through the heavy lines of Higgins with ease 
and sense of timing that us usually attributed to veterans 
of the stage. 

Eliza ( Rebecca Lamoreaux ) is a product of the slums 
who is literally forced upon society as a duchess after 
taking phonetic lessons from Higgins. But after being 
lifted from the gutter to the throne, she becomes an 
uncontrollable human being instead of a guiniea pig 
in a scientific experiment. The play is complicated by 
the question of what is to be done with Eliza after she 
has been given the means of becoming a woman of the 




A TENSE MOMENT occurs in the second act of Pygmalion, as most of 
the major characters assemble on the stage. Shaw's play received a 
handsome performance at the hands of the Kansas State Players. 



world, indebted to everyone for her social position. 

Of the not-to-be-forgotten parts in the play was Fred 
Kramer as Papa Doolittle of the undeserving poor. 
Robert Richey and Profesor O. D. Hunt maintained 
their individual reputations for fine scenery and expert 
lighting. 

Other members of the cast were Ray Bowman, Floy 
Buckles, Janet Ray, Wolfram Wolz, Kay Wortman, 
Lucille Lambert, John Haines, Carl Kish, Lesley Den- 
nison, Bill Anderson, Carol Myers, Patricia Nelson, 
Tony Ceranich, and Joan Newcomer. 



GARTH GRISSOM, as Higgins, explains his motives to Bill Anderson as 
the Colonel while Rebecca Lamoreaux as Eliza listens in this scene from 



the spring production of Pygmalion. The first act of this presentation gave 
the audience something different in atmosphere characteristics. 




269 



Kansas State College Judging Teams Place High 




CROPS JUDGING TEAM— Back row: Prof. C. D. Davis, Ronald 
Livers, Roger D. Hamilton. Front row: J. W. Zahnley, coach; Charles 
Ray, Wayne Pearce. 



A FTER a lapse of five years due to the war, two 
intercollegiate contests in grading and judging 
crop products were held this year. The crops judging 
team, led by their coach, J. W. Zahnley, professor in 
the agronomy department, ranked third among the 
seven competing teams at the Kansas City National 
Collegiate Grain Judging Contest held at Kansas City, 
Mo. 

Travel to Contests 

Traveling farther afield (many juding teams go all 
over the country) the crops judging team attended the 
International Collegiate Crops Judging Contest held 
at Chicago, 111. At this contest the team ranked fourth 
among the seven competing teams. 



The Dairy Cattle Judging Team, although not 
attending many contests, did go to Waterloo, Iowa in 
September to compete in the National Intercollegiate 
Judging Contest. 

Led by G. H. Beck, associate professor of the dairy 
husbandry department, the team walked away with no 
trophies. They placed last in the contest. 

Juniors Place High 

Several junior judging teams came out with prizes 
this fall. Traveling to various parts of the nation these 
junior teams brought home the trophies to stack in the 
big cases in West Waters Hall. 

Among these was the Junior Livestock Judging Team 
with six members, coached by Don L. Good, instructor 
in the animal husbandry department. 

Out of many teams competing, the Junior Livestock 
judging team placed first at the contest held in Denver, 
Colo., this fall. Other junior teams placed first in their 
contests. 

Judging teams offer practical experience to ag stu- 
dents and membership is honorary, that is, students 
try out for places on the judging teams. Kansas State 
was always held in high reputation in contests which 
they have entered throughout the nation, coming out 
with many firsts and cups. 



DAIRY CATTLE JUDGING TEAM— Back row: G. H. Beck, coach; 
Harry Mudge. Front row: Arthur Jacobs, Richard Eaton, Thomas 
Bentlev. 



JUNIOR LIVESTOCK JUDGING TEAM— Back row: Don L. Good, 
coach; Norman A. Minks; Tom C. Carleton. Front row: Samuel R. 
Harris, Eugene N. Francis, Glenn McCormick, Howard W. Dinges. 





270 



in Agriculture Contests Across the Country 



/^~\THER judging teams won the respect of groups 
from other colleges and their judges. 

The Meats Judging Team competed in two inter- 
collegiate contests. They went to the American Royal 
Meat Judging Contest at Kansas City, Mo., and the 
International Meat Judging Contest at Chicago, 111. 

This team ranked eighth among 1 competing teams 
at Kansas City. At Chicago, they ranked twelfth among 

16 teams competing in the event. 

The Meats Judging Team was coached by David 
L. Mackintosh, associate professor of animal husbandry. 

Win K. C. Honors 

The Livestock Judging Team led by coach F. W. 
Bell, professor in the Department of Animal Husband- 
ry, entered two intercollegiate judging contests. High 
honors were theirs at the American Royal at Kansas 
City, Mo., in October when they ranked second, with 

17 college judging teams in the competition. 

At the International Livestock Exposition which was 
held in Chicago, 111., in November, the Livestock Judg- 
ing Team placed eighth in the field of 30 colleges 
attending and competing in the event. 

The Poultry Science Club was represented by the 
Poultry Judging Team at the twenty-third annual Inter- 
collegiate Poultry Judging Contest at Chicago in De- 
cember. 




MEATS JUDGING TEAM— Back row: David L. Mackintosh, coach; 
George R. Dunn; Harold T. Black. Front row: Thomas W. Sullivant, 
Bobbie A. Steele, Howard Lindholm. 



K-State rated sixth among 17 teams. The rotating 
trophy that has been in circulation since 1934 has been 
won twice by Kansas State College Poultry Judging 
Teams. 

Judge Home Contests 

In addition to the many out-of-state and inter- 
collegiate contests entered by the judging teams, some 
of the departmental clubs in the School of Agriculture 
sponsor judging contests and practice on home grounds. 
These include not only the college groups, but contests 
are also held during the Little American Royal and the 
Future Farmers of America weeks for boys of high 
school age. Attendance at the home shows this year 
filled the livestock pavilion to capacity. 



LIVESTOCK JUDGING TEAM— Back row: F. W. Bell, coach; Philip 
Sanders; James M. Collier; Clair Parcel. Front row: Richard Winger, 
Linton Lull, Charles Nesbit, Richard Warren. 



POULTRY JUDGING TEAM— Back row: Tom Carleton, Victor Dew- 
hirst, John Tasker. Front row: T. B. Avery, coach; Fred Glue; Tom 
James. 





271 




A CAPPELLA CHOIR — Back row: Juanita Silva, Lorene Francis, 
Ronald Stinson, John Kohn, Herbert Simmons, Don Wempe, Casey 
Edell, Mowry Gilbert, Charles Halbower, Jerome M'Cay, Wendell 
Pascoe, Harry Cordes, Joe Morgan, James Heaton, Allen Nelson, 
Mert Schwenson, Joe Hodgson, William Hauserman, Martin Augle- 
myer, Glenn Byrd, Wilbur Brown, Mary Lou Ford, Helen Boatright. 
Third row: Iris Arnold, Georgi Gress, Carl Morgan, George Hewitt, 
Robert Chesney, William Baetz, Joe Paukaskie, Paul Brown, Ivan 
Rundus, Charles Whitney, Max Friesen, Duane Tietze, Fred Kramer, 
Maurice Wear, Don Vandagriff, Lyman Hancock, Norris Carlson, 



Paul Kelly, Russell Duncan, Shirley King, Elizabeth Mustard. Second- 
row: Janet Ray, Marilyn Davis, Jeanette Doran, Patricia Nelson, Patri- 
cia Moll, Roberta King, Ann Martin, Inez Strutt, Naomi Fralick, Eva 
Moehlman, Joy Hageman, Virginia Eddy, Nannette Martin, Ardeth 
Maupin, Emelie Snyder, Barbara King, Lucy Reardon, Virginia Wyatt, 
Helen Hammond, Ruth Gilek. Front row: Elizabeth Ann Wilcox, 
Lyal Laughinghouse, Phyllis Martin, Madeline Asher, Mary Jo Staley, 
Marilyn Bryan, Marion Terrill, Mary Collister, Wilma Straight, Vivian 
Hawley, Ann Thackrey, Margaret Davies, Marilyn Keeshan, Jo Ann 
Stroup, Mary Henson, Patricia March. 



* 

Concerts, Programs Presented By Groups 



HpHE A CAPPELLA CHOIR, composed of 85 mem- 
bers is selected from the entire College student body 
by the director, Prof. Luther Leavengood during tryouts 
conducted at the beginning of each semester. 

Climaxing the year's activities of the Choir was the 
A Cappella tour, made in April. The Choir sang in 
high schools in the east central part of Kansas. 

WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB— Back row: Nada Weddle, Mila Brown, 
Marguerite Jolly, Alice Kerbs, Corrin Oberhelman, Jerry Gatz, Eliza- 
beth Mayall, Marlys Wain, Marian Skaggs. Third row: Phylis Fiehtner, 
Margery Mitchell, Barbara Roth, Patricia Beeby, Marjorie Landau, 
Ilavere Oldfield, Alice Ann Dawson, Margaret jett, Marjorie Imler. 
Second row: Rolla Lou Blood, Helen Mathis, Barbara Strowig, Pat 



The Women's Glee Club with a membership of 36, 
presented a new type of winter concert this year by 
combining their talents with those of the modern dance 
club. A joint recital was presented. 

Under the direction of Miss Grossman, the group met 
three times a week. Their final appearance was in the 
Easter assembly. Jerry Gatz accompanied the club. 

Adams, Donna Swezy, Betty Duphorne, Barbara McCoid, Joann Har- 
rison, Lauranell Hawkinson, Kathleen Kaup. Front row: Olivia Tie- 
mann, Leona Muckenthaler, Jocelyn Swartz, Jo Anne Wolgast, Bern- 
etta Bonnett, Marie Amerine, Eleanor Sommer, Mary Simpson, Peggy 
Lee. 




272 







MEN'S GLEE CLUB — Back row: Allen Londeen, Gordon Young, 
Roland Weaver, Robert McLeod, Leslie Heter, Melvin Aufdemberge, 
Vernon Hesterman. Third row: Miles Williams, John Bascom, Donald 
Love, Thaine Larson, Lloyd Poison, Harold McCauley, Gordon Mc- 
Cauley, Richard Tesche. Second row: Merton Green, Max Wade, 



James Stanley, John Schnittker, John Fleener, Roger Wilk, Clarence 
Suelter. Front row: Richard Dickerson, Harold Broadie, Robert Hemp- 
hill, Charles Lentz, Murlin Nutter, Ray Thompson, David Bartholo- 
mew, James Gaskell. 



Glee Club Gives Programs, Serenades 



Y\77TTH a total of 60 Kansas State students as mem- 
bers, the Men's Glee Club, under the direction 
of J. Forest West made its first apearance at the 
groundbreaking ceremony for the new Memorial Chap- 
el. This occurred during the fall Homecoming festivi- 
ties, which were attended by General of the Army 
Dwight D. Eisenhower on October 25, 1947. 

During the year, the Men's Glee Club participated 
in two serenades. First was the Christmas all-College 
asembly, which was followed by the Christmas Carol 
serenade. In this serenade, the Glee Club toured all 
the organized women's houses and rendered Christmas 
Carols to appreciative audiences. 

It is the custom of the Glee Club to hold a second 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB— Back row: Richard Cederberg, Ervin Syfert, 
Don Reinhardt, Ira Williams, Ray George, Dana Childs, Oscar Al- 
brecht, Harding Warren, Clinton Davies. Third row: Dale Davies, 
John Ice, Lafe Williams, Lyle Morris, William Borst, William Eddy, 
Lawrence Crow, Dwaine Clark, John Holloway. Second row: Max 



serenade in the spring. 

An annual Spring Concert is also part of the activi- 
ties of the Men's Glee Club. To help publicize their 
concert, the Glee Club conducted a one-day tour to 
schools, both in the city of Manhatan and neighboring 
cities and communities. 

The Men's Glee Club has taken an active part in 
several local functions. Among these, was singing for 
the Sigma Eta Chi initiation last fall. Sigma Eta Chi is 
a women's church group. 

The aim of the Glee Club, is to promote, not only 
an interest in music, but more technical training and an 
appreciation of the enjoyment of singing. 

Their accompanist is Patricia Nelson. 

Deets, Bernard Jilka, Mowry Gilbert, Jed Ramsey, Leroy Atwell, Paul 
Lundgren, Arthur Schumann, David Kiser. Front row: Bill Estill, Dan 
Clark, Paul Wolf, Carl Holt, Patricia Nelson, Walter Zurfluh, Bill 
Clark, Garth Grissom, Earl Phillips. 




273 







THE KANSAS STATE COLLEGE MARCHING BAND that per- 
formed at game half-time during the football season and amazed 



and amused fans. Director Jene Hedlund created a new type of band 
for the school. 



Band Split into Three New Groups 

T^OOTBALL fans will long remember the Kansas during the football season. At the conclusion of the 

State Marching Band this year for the numerous season, the total band membership of over 100 was 

stunts performed under the direction of Jean Hedlund divided into two units, the Varsity and Concert Bands. 



KANSAS STATE CONCERT BAND— Flute: Eugene Kenney, Mary 
Mcllvain, Tom Foster, Jeanne Frisbie. Oboe: Edwes Roush, Geraldine 
Beam. Bassoon: Paul Swan. Alto Clarinet: Phyllis Van Vliet. Bass 
Clarinet: Bob Smith. B flat Clarinet: Dick Coy, Russell Coleman, 
Elmer Simon, Sherman Callott, Bill Colver, Rodney Boyles, Bob 
Miller, Wallace List, Katheryn Hatcher, Madge Crabb, Jane Colby, 
Rodney Leonard, Helen Hennon, Virginia Parr. Alto Saxophone: Rose- 
mary Wright, Orvin Tiemann. Tenor Saxophone: Gerald Hires, Ray- 
mond George. Baritone Saxophone: Donald Meenen. Bass Saxophone: 



Page Twiss. Cornet: James McCahon, Glendeen Link, Max Smith, 
Duane Snyder, James Bader, Jim Vycital, John Crabb, Jim Wharton. 
French Horn: Wayne Davidson, Bill Harper, Leanna Siler, Dean 
Kays, John Hughes, Margaret Starkey. Trombone: LeRoy Lederer, 
Max Stone, Ralph Fuhrken, Henry Starkey, Warren McCauley, Norva 
Wolfe. Baritone: Larry Good, Clarence Clay, Jack Hayward, Ar- 
lene Pierce, Gloria Turtle. Bass: John Bascom, Warden Keas, Don 
Downing, Bill Thornburrow, Percussion: Gene DeLong, Jim Clark, 
Bob Shaffer, George Bronaugh, Timpani: Clyde Dalrymple. 




274 



Orchestra Draws Capacity Crowd 



/ ~pHE 50-piece College-Civic Orchestra under the 
direction of Prof. Luther Leavengood, is continually 
striving for a larger membership, but even though its 
group is small, it has contributed much in musical 
enjoyment to students and townspeople. 

The Orchestra made its first public appearance of the 
year in a winter concert held in the College Auditorium 
on January 20. 

The program consisted of the "Concert Grosso Num- 
ber Eight" for two violins and cello solo with string 
orchestra, by Arcangelo Corelli; the overture from the 
"Magic Flute," by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; "The 
Walk to the Paradise Gardens," by Frederick Delius; 
Rumanian folk dances of "Joe cu Bata", "Braul", "Pe 
Loc", "Muciumeania", and "Maruntel", by Bela Bartok; 
the "Jamacan Rumba' by Arthur Benjamin; and the 
first movement of the "Symphony Number Five in E 
Minor, Opus 64," by Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky. 

Accompany "Messiah" 

The group of musicians capably accompanied the 
Manhattan Civic Chorus in its presentation of Handel's 



"Messiah," given March 21 in the College Auditorium. 
The "Messiah" featured soloists from over Kansas, 
and the bass soloist was J. Forrest West of the Kansas 
State College Department of Music. Other singers came 
from Lindsborg and Kansas City, and sang the parts 
of coloratura, soprano and tenor. This was the first 
year in which an attempt has been made on the stage of 
the auditorium to present such a coordinated perform- 
ance between a choral group and an orchestra. The 
"Messiah" performance drew an audience of more than 
two thousand students and townspeople. 

The final appearance of the College-Civic Orchestra 
was during Music Week, when they joined with the rest 
of the music organizations on the campus in devoting 
the seven days to the promotion of music. 

The orchesra's main contribution to music week was 
the accompanying of several young artists in a program 
of concertos and opera arias. Among these were Con- 
certo No. 24 in C minor for piano and orchestra, by 
Mozart; Symphonie Espangnole for violin and orches- 
tra, by Lalo; Concerto in A minor Opus 16 for piano 
and orchestra, by Grieg; and Duet "La ci darem la 
Mano", from "Don Giovanni," by Mozart. 



COLLEGE-CIVIC ORCHESTRA— Violins: Robert Woodson, William 
Baetz, Phyllis Berlin, Marjorie Briscoe, Harry Brown, George Bro- 
naugh, Joseph Curry, Margery Dunn, Jean Eddy, Marilyn Froman, 
Mary Hagerud, Brenton Madison, Ruth Kugler, Nannette Martin, Mary 
Jane Rix. Violas: Max Martin, Betty Lovell, Dorothy Miller, Myrtle 
Tjerandsen. Cellos: Stephanie Sulinski, Shirley Deck, Lois Johnson, 
Wanda Lee Mickey. Basses: Paul Kelly, John Bascom, Juanita Cooper, 
Robert Smith. Flutes: Eugene Kenney, Elizabeth Nichols, Mary Mc- 



Ilvain. English bom: Jean Hedlund. Oboes: Jean Hedlund, Edwes 
Roush, Paul Huddleston. Clarinets: Richard Coy, Russell Coleman. 
Bassoons: Paul Swan, William Colver. French horns: Wayne David- 
son, William Harper, Leanna Siler, Thomas Steunenberg. Cornets: 
James McCahon, Glendeen Link. Trombones: Ralph Fuhrken, Norva 
Wolfe, Warren McCauley. Tuba: John Bascom. Timpani: John 
Money. Accessories: Madge Crabb, Norva Wolfe. Piano: Charles 
Stratton, Mary Young. Conductor: Luther Leavengood. 




275 




JOURNALISM STUDENTS are the broadcasters in the class in Radio 
News. The class writes the scripts concerning news on the campus for 
the daily five-minute show. Above, taking their turn at the mike are 
Elaine Howenstine and Jim Orton. 

' I 'WO NEW studios and a new control room are 
boasted this year by the radio section of the Depart- 
ment of Speech. An extensive remodeling program 
done early this year made station KSAC the most 
modern training station in Kansas. 

With 160 people enrolled in radio classes, all script 
writing, directing and actual production was done by 
students on many radio programs including "What's 

THE K-STATE DEBATE SQUAD which can argue for or against any 
given issue are standing, left to right, Vernon McGuire, coach; John 



Active in Debate, Radio 

New," "Radio Workshop," "This Week in History," 
"Market Basket," "Sports Cast," and "Scrapbook of 
Sports." 

To prepare students for positions in commercial radio 
work is the aim of the radio section. Students can 
either major or minor in radio at KSC. F. Virginia 
Howe and Vernon McGuire are the assistant professors. 

High honors were won by members of the K-State 
Debate Team when they placed second at the sixteenth 
annual Forensic Tournament held at St. John's College 
at Winfield. The team also placed second in the pro- 
vince of 33 schools at the Pi Kappa Delta Regional 
Tournament at Colorado A and M. 

Other tournaments attended were the Debate and 
Discussion Conference at the University of Nebraska, 
the Missouri Valley Forensic Tournament at Kansas 
University and the Spring Forensic Tournament at the 
University of Texas. 

Tasker; Norman Collins, Jim Tucker. Seated, Dick Dethloff, Shirley 
Smith, Marshall Schirer. 







276 



4-H Publishes Annual 



A LARGER county page, more news about 4-H 

activities throughout the state and the Collegiate 

4-H Club and a bigger advertising section than ever 

before, made this year's Who's Whoot larger and better 

than ever. 

Who's Whoot, 4-H Club year book, is an annual 
project of the K-State club. It features club activities, 
state 4-H leaders and outstanding state and national 
4-H contest winers. 

Who's Whoot has over 90 county pages and the size 
has increased from last year's 128 pages to more than 
200 this year. The yearbook is financed by advertising 
and money paid by each county for material about their 
clubs and leaders. 

The editor of the book this year was Virginia 
Grandfield, of Wichita. Virginia is a senior in home 
economics and was assistant editor of last year's book. 

The entire staff of the 1948 edition was chosen by 
the staff of last year's book, with the assistance of J. 




EDITOR AND ASSISTANT of Who's Whoot, 4-H Club Annual, are 
Collegiate Club members Virginia Grandfield and (left) Pearl Lilliequist. 



Harold Johnson, state 4-H leader. Two hours class 
credit in journalism are allowed the editor. 

Other members of the staff this year are Dale Apel, 
Longton, assistant editor; Pearl Lilliequist, Medicine 
Lodge, business manager; Jean Hare, Viola, advertising 
manager; Mary Nelson, Humboldt, county page editor; 
Victor Tilley, Frankfort, sales manager; Mike Burns, 
Topeka, collegiate editor; and Louise Mosier, Hoxie, 
special feaures editor. 



MEMBERS OF THE WHO'S WHOOT STAFF added more than 90 
pages to this year's book. Left to right, they are Jean Hare; Louise 



Mosier; Pearl Lilliequist; Mary Nelson; Virginia Grandfield, editor; and 
Victor Tilley. 




277 






^f 



L 





AG STUDENT STAFF — Back row: Charles Foreman; Shannon 
Nickelson, photographer; James Rockers; Wyman White; Bill Rich- 
ards; Kenneth Goertzen; Harold Ray. Front row: Glenn Allen; Dana 



Jennings; Prof. E. B. Macy, faculty advisor; Richard Burns; John 
Tasker, editor; Melvin Cotner, business manager; Dean Reese. 



Staffs Publish Vocational Periodicals 



; I 'HE Kansas Agricultural Student has completed its 
23rd year of publication. Published four times 
yearly the magazine is distributed to all students in 
agriculture and to high schools throughout the state. 
It is financed by advertising solicited by the staff, and 
by funds allotted from the Ag Seminar fee. 

The editors are selected each semester by the Agri- 
cultural Association, and organization to which each ag 
student gains membership upon enrolling. The staff 
has remained the same this year, with the exception of 
the photographer, Shannon Nickelson. He was suc- 
ceeded by Harold Ray. Selected for editor was John 
Tasker, and Melvin Cotner was named business man- 
ager. Prof. E. B. Macy, experiment station editor, served 
as faculty advisor throughout the year. 

K-STATE ENGINEER STAFF— Back row: Garland Lichty, Ralph 
Ricklefs, Donald Gray, Ted Jones, Leatrice Burket, Winston Schmidt, 
Gabe Sellers, Jr. Third row: Norbert Sidorowicz, William Borland, Jr., 
John Green, Irvine Gandee, Wayne Haworth. Glenn Utt, Jr., Donald 
McCracken. Second row: Danny Shupp, Bob Clary, Jim Fassett, 



Published monthly by the students of the School of 
Engineering and Architecture, the Kansas State Engi- 
neer brings an up to date view of engineering advance- 
ment in the world today. Editor Murlin Hodgell 
stresses the importance of modern engineering in his 
monthly editorial columns. 

The magazine is divided into five departments, each 
with an associate editor in charge. These departments 
include such sub-titles as Enginalumne, Engineying, 
Enginuts'nbolts, Enginiffties, and Enginextras. 

Aside from the important and educational feature 
material and the departmental information, an unusual 
asortment of witticisms add a personal touch to the 
magazine. Every student in engineering receives a copy 
of the publication. 

Richard Sizemore, Jack Hoefer, John Green, Jr., William Markey. 
Front row: Rodney Keif, Richard Finegan, Raymond Schneider, Herb 
Stough, Robert Shaw, Dick Stockman, Richard Dickerson, Murlin 
Hodgell. 




278 



(lelea&e J\teiu& 



Lowell Brandner was introduced 
last fall as the News Bureau Assistant. 
Arleta Barber is the secretary. To- 
gether, they send campus news to the 
three major press associations and to 
individual newspapers all over the 
state. The bureau also makes all ar- 
rangements for wire coverage of big 
events and acts as host to visiting news- 
men. Pictures of all major events are 
distributed with the news stories. 




CLEARING HOUSE FOR K-STATE NEWS, is the News Bureau office, where secretary Arleta 
Barber (left) types multiple copies of the stories written by Lowell Brandner (right). 




KANSAS MAGAZINE policy is guided by board members, left to right, 
Prof. Ted Peterson, Prof. John Helm, Prof. Ralph Lashbrook, Prof. Robert 
Conover, Margene Falen, Prof. C. J. Medlin and Prof. E. T. Keith. 



PidJUlik McUfOfyiH& 



Members of the Colege faculty make up the saff of 
the annually published Kansas Magazine. The board 
of directors (left) pass on all material submitted to the 
book. The magazine prints the best submitted material 
by Kansas authors and poets, along with outstanding 
work by Kansas artists. Prof. Ralph Lashbrook heads 
the board. Prof. R. W. Conover is editor. When pub- 
lished, the magazine is distributed through bookstores 
and news-stands in all parts of the state. 



9nyan4n Alumni 

Journalism faculty members, and 
the staff of the Alumni Association, 
prepare and publish the bi-monthly 
Kansas State Industrialist, official or- 
gan of the College and the Alumni 
Association. The newspaper features 
news slanted for alumni interest. Big 
items in the Industrialist's columns this 
year were the drive for a new Chapel 
in commemoration of K-State war 
dead, and the champion Wildcat bas- 
ketball team's conquests. 



OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, The Kansas State Industrialist, is pro- 
duced by staff members (left to right) Bonnie Woods, Mary Ann Montgomery, Fred Parris and 
Ralph Lashbrook. Professor Lashbrook is listed as editor of the publication. 




279 




Board Governs Student 



PROF. RALPH LASHBROOK, head of the Department of 
Journalism, is chairman of the Board of Directors of Student 
Publications, Inc. 



' I f HE Board of Student Publications plays an 
important role on the campus. The editor 
and business manager of the Collegian and the 
Royal Purple are chosen by this board. The 
board also approves the budgets of the various 
publications, determines the size of each publi- 
cation and approves all major contracts. 

The board includes three student members 
and three faculty men — Mae Weaver, Hardy 
Berry, John Shupe, Prof. H. W. Davis, Prof. E. 



T. Keith, Prof. R. R. Lashbrook, chairman. The student repre- 
sentatives are elected by the student body each spring at the 
time of the annual election. 

Applications for editor and busines manager of each publi- 
cation may be made by any student in the college who meets 
the scholastic requirement. In selecting students for these posi- 
tions, the board considers experience, personal qualifications, 
and length of service on the publication. Gold "K" keys are 
awarded by the Student Publications, Inc. to those staff members 
of the Collegian and the Royal Purple who earn them by 
doing outstanding work on the respective publications. 

Forty-four members of the Royal Purple and 23 from the 
Collegian staff won "K's" this year. Three students received 
keys for their work on both of the publications. The awards 
were presented at the annual Publications Banquet at the Man- 
hattan Country Club on May 11. 

Students receiving "K" keys for their Royal Purple work 
were: Martha Adams, Shirley Hill, Marilyn Davis, Barbara 
King, Barbara Kellogg, Jim Curtis, Ruth Muirhead, Duane 
Patterson, Darrell Cowell, Nancy Maunger, Hary Henson, 
Joann Blackwelder, Carolyn McNabney, Jean Holmgren, Vir- 
ginia Bryan, Catherine Merrill, Mary Frances Cooney, Nannette 
Soper, Don Hueben, Carol Bates, Frances Callahan, Mary 
Frances Zink, Don Gray, Bob Hudelson, Shirley Nichols, Rod 
Keif, Maxine Keesling, Deloris Montague, Joanne Brewer, 
Gwen Wilson, Connie Armitage, Ann Thackrey, Betty Hink- 




IMPORTANT DECISIONS con- 
cerning student publications are 
made by members of the Board. 
They are Prof. H. W. Davis, John 
Shupe, Mae Weaver, Prof. Ralph 
Lashbrook, Prof. C. J. Medlin, 
Hardy Berry and Prof E. T. Keith. 



280 



Publications 




house, Pat Nelson, Pete Ba- 
con, Jim Clinger, Milton 
Eisenhower, Jr., Bob Lar- 
berg, L. D. Compton, Benny 
Stewart, Virginia Gingrich, 
Tom Moreen, Ralph Salis- 
bury, and Walter Warren. 

Collegian staff members 
receiving keys were: LeRoy 
Allman, Maurice Cotton, 
Darrell Cowell, Janey Hack- 
ney, Jim Clinger, Barbara 
Holmes, Yvonne Allman, 
Johnny Johnson, Floyd Sage- 
ser, Mae Weaver, Tom 
Leathers, Bill Krause, Don 
Alexander, Norville Gish, Roger Swanson, Ralph Salisbury, 
Roger Medlin, Bill Mall, Ruthe Peg Thackery, Marjorie Setter, 
Nina Peck, Lee Keck, and Clyde A. Osburn. 

Awards for work on both publications were made to Darrell 
Cowell, Jim Clinger, and Ralph Salisbury. 

Graduate Manager of Student Publications is C. J. Medlin. 
"Chief," as he is known in Kedzie Hall, gives sound advice to 
the staffs of the Collegian and the Royal Purple. In addition 
to advising the editorial staffs, he works closely with the busi- 
ness staff on both advertising and circulation. 



. "CHIEF" MEDLIN, graduate manager of Student Publications, keeps the wheels running 
i the Collegian and the Royal Purple. Shown commenting on the Chief's winter top-coat 



PROF. C. J. 

Smoothly on the Collegiun unu uie iwyui ruiuie. jnuwii iLMiiiiiciiniiy uii iiic \»mci b wiiiici 

are members of the Collegian staff, (left to right) Maurice Cotton, Bill Mall and Roger Medlin. 



Mr. Medlin's rigth hand girl is Pat Grentner 
Zeleznak. Answering the questions of bewil- 
dered newcomers to Kedzie Hall is part of her 
job. Pat assists in running the student publica- 
tions' business office. 

The Student Council delegated the authority 
of publishing the Student Directory to the Board 
of Student Publications this year. Mrs. Eva 
Ward was appointed editor by the board and 
started work last summer. 




PAT GRENTNER ZELEZNAK (left) 
handles much of the business manage- 
ment of Student Publications and also 
serves as Professor Medlin's secretary. 
Pat ends her last year here as her hus- 
band, Mike, is graduated this semester. 
More than 175 pages of Student Direc- 
tory were compiled, edited and published 
this year under the guidance of MRS. 
EVA WARD (right). All work on the Di- 
rectory was completed in less than two 
months. 




281 




COLLEGIAN LEADERSHIP during the summer 
term was in the hands of Yvonne Sturgeon All- 
man (left), who previously spent two semesters 
at the copy desk. In spite of shortages of paper 
and staff, Yvonne put out a good paper, with 
attractive make-up and wide news coverage. 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT was headed by cap- 
able Marjorie Setter, (right) who also headed 
the department during the spring semester of 
the previous year. Marge was equally solicitous 
of single line ads and half page screamers. 




Husband- Wife Combo Heads Summer Collegian 



The Kansas State Collegian is the student newspaper 
— student written, student read and student owned. 
Like the Royal Purple and the Student Directory, The 
Collegian is controlled by Student Publications, Inc., 
a corporation supported by activity fund apportionment 
and advertising revenue. The bi-weekly Collegian is 
published on Tuesdays and Fridays, with copies avail- 
able for all students who have paid their activity fee. 

During summer months when enrollment was 
slightly lower, the Collegian was published on a weekly 
schedule only. There were fewer student reporters, 



making the entire editorial staff double at writing along 
with their copy and proof-reading duties. 

Summer editor Yvonne Allman assumed a unique 
role when appointed by the publications board. She was 
editor, while her husband, LeRoy Allman, was assistant 
editor. Sports editor during the summer term was Lewis 
"Johnny" Johnson, with Peg Knight Thackery handling 
the society columns. Advertising revenues were solici- 
ted and collected by business manager Marjorie Setter 
and assistant Roger Medlin. Marjorie completed her 
second term as business manager of the Collegian. 




THOSE GOLDEN K-KEYS were 
distributed to the outstanding 
students contributing to student 
publications in 1946-47, at the 
annual Publications Banquet. Also 
selected, was the editor who 
made the biggest "boner" dur- 
ing the year. Helen Peterson 
won the dubious distinction. 



282 




ABLE MANAGER, ROGER MEDLIN (left) handled 
advertising contracts and other business details 
for the Collegian during both fall and spring 
semesters. In addition to running the crew of 
ad salesmen, Roger did all the layout work and 
page make-up of the ad sections on every paper. 



LE ROY ALLMAN, fall semester editor (right), 
was an all-around newspaper man. He wrote 
many of the big stories, edited the copy — and 
even did much of the back-room shop work. 
Upon graduation, LeRoy accepted a job as man- 
aging editor of a county weekly newspaper. 




Allman Edits, Medlin Manages Fall Collegian 



LeRoy Allman assumed leadership on the Collegian 
during the fall semester, but didn't quite get. even 
with Yvonne. Mrs. Allman received her diploma upon 
completing her summer school editorship, so the tables 
were not completely reversed. 

Among the many big stories covered by the fall 
Collegian, were the hugely increased enrollment, the 
Homecoming visit of General Dwight Eisenhower and 
the more controversial recommendations of the Student 
Planning Committee. Among these were the ban on 
corsages at all dances and the proposal to change the 



Alma Mater. The Collegian also successfully pushed 
a clean-up program for local eating places. 

Staff members during the fall term were editor All- 
man; Maurice Cotton, assistant editor; Darrell Cowell, 
copy desk editor; Charles Lyon and Janey Hackney, 
copy desk assistants; Jim dinger, sports; Barbara 
Holmes, society; and Roger Medlin and Bill Mall, 
business manager and assistant. 

The positions of editor and business manager on the 
Collegian are appointive, by the Board of Student Publi- 
cations. 



THE KANSAS DAY EDITION of 
the Topeka Daily Capital was 
edited and written by journalism 
students. Processing copy for im- 
patient linotype crews are (Front 
row): Norville Gish, sports edi- 
tor; Keith Tabor, reporter; Ralph 
Salisbury, city editor; Don Alex- 
ander, copy desk assistant; Dar- 
rell Cowell, copy desk editor. 
Standing in the background are 
left to right, Ted Peterson, fac- 
ulty advisor; Milton Tabor, man- 
aging editor of the Capital; and 
Fred Parris, also of the faculty. 




283 




FLOYD SAGESER, ed- 
itor of the Collegian 
during the spring se- 
mester, was formerly 
assistant sports editor 
and general reporter. 
Before assuming the 
top position on the 
Collegian, Floyd was 
undergradute corres- 
pondent for a daily 
newspaper. The Col- 
legian blossomed under 
several screaming 
headlines during the 
spring term as the 
Wildcat basketball 
team knocked off vic- 
tory after victory. 



"CDITOR of the Collegian during the spring term 
was Floyd Sageser, industrial journalism junior. 
He was capably aided by two assistant editors, Darrell 
Cowell and Mae Weaver. Tom Leathers, assisted by 
Don Alexander and Bill Krause, was head of the copy 
desk. Sports editor Norville Gish and Pete Engelken, 
his assistant, exhorted the virtues of a sports writer's 
dream team — the champion basketball squad. Society 
columns were carefully compiled by Janie Hackney. 

Completing his fourth semester on Collegian busi- 
ness staffs, Roger Medlin was again in charge of the 
advertising purse-strings. Bill Mall, also with several 



Sageser Is Spring Editor 



semesters service, was assistant business manager. 

Big stories for the spring semester reporters were, of 
course, headed by the events surrounding basketball 
contests. Among there were lines which formed five 
hours early for games, statue tintings and sundry com- 
ments on the eligibility of Dr. Phog. Also receiving 
major coverage were the newly instituted series of 
College-sponsored lectures on Courtship and Marriage 
and campus politics. 

Kansas State journalists took their annual turn on a 
big city daily when they wrote and edited the Topeka 
Daily Capital on Kansas Day, January 29- Students 
in all journalism classes wrote state -coverage stories in 
advance and outstanding students were selected by a 
faculty committee to make the Topeka trip. There 
they covered the Kansas Day political meetings, society, 
sports and the regular beats, as well as doing the actual 
desk work. 

Staff members for the Kansas Day paper included 
Ralph Salisbury, editor; John Tasker, assistant editor; 
Darrell Cowell, copy desk; Norville Gish, sports; and 
Barbara Holmes, society page. 



STAFF MEMBERS CONTRIBUTING THEIR EFFORTS toward a 
bigger and better Collegian during the spring term were left to right: 
Tom Leathers, copy desk editor; Bill Krause, copy desk assistant; 
Janey Hackney, society editor; Mae Weaver, assistant editor; Don 



Alexander, copy desk assistant; Darrell Cowell, assistant editor; and 
Norville Gish, sports editor. Advertising salesmen this year, not 
shown in picture, were Nina Peck, Peggy Wilcox, Clyde Osburn, 
Ardith Durnil, and Lee Keck. 




284 



New Features in Royal Purple 



/"ANCE again the Royal Purple makes its debut with 

a purple and white cover. A new feature of the 

book is its division into chapters — 11 of them, each 

carrying out the themes of the Wildcat and the "Hill." 

Edited by Virginia Gingrich, the 1948 Royal Purple 
contains 448 pages of organizations, class pictures and 
campus events. This is a 32 page, increase over last 
year's book. 

Work was started on the annual last spring — pictures 
were taken and layouts made. Printing and engraving 
contracts were then let. The opening and division pages 
were drawn up and nearly completed in the fall. 

Tom Moreen, business manager, and Virginia at- 
tended the National Scholastic Press Association con- 
vention in Minneapolis, Minn., in October. While there, 
cover samples were examined and several brought 
back for selection by the Board of Student Publications. 
Prof. C. J. Medlin, graduate manager of Student Publi- 
cations, was an instructor of the year book school at the 
convention. 

During the following months, the remaining pictures 
were taken by the photography staff and one-fourth of 
the book was sent to the Capper Printing Company by 



ROYAL PURPLE EDI- 
TOR for 1948, Virginia 
Gingrich, supervised 
the editorial staff, 
made layouts, and cor- 
rected copy. Yet a 
junior, Virginia cli- 
maxed three years' 
work on the RP editor- 
ial staffs. 




February 20. 

All of the pages were at the printers by the middle of 
April. Engraving of pictures was done by the Burger- 
Baird Engraving Company of Kansas City, Mo. The 
book, whose cover is purple and white, was bound by 
Charno of Kansas City. 

The 1947 Royal Purple, edited by Tess Montgomery, 
received an Ail-American Honor rating from the Na- 
tional Scholastic Press Association. This was the twelfth 
consecutive year that the Royal Purple received the 
highest award given by the N.S.P.A. 



ROYAL PURPLE EDITORIAL STAFF— Back row: Marilyn Davis, 
Jim Curtis, Joann Blackwelder, Duane Patterson, Barbara Kellogg, 
Darrell Cowell, Martha Adams, Ruthe Peg Thackrey. Front row: Mary 



Henson, Carolyn McNabney, Jean Holmgren, Nancy Munger, Ruth 
Muirhead, Shirley Hill, Barbara King. 




285 




Editorial and Business Staffs 



WHEEL AROUND 
KEDZIE, Ralph Salis- 
bury, RP assistant 
editor, took a whirl 
at nearly everything 
there was to be done 
on the book. Salis- 
bury was also one of 
the more prolific 
writers for the Col- 
legian. 



A LL volunteer workers, the editorial staff members 
of the Royal Purple used up many free hours dog- 
trotting around the campus in search of new infor- 
mation. 

Led by Ralph Salisbury, Assistant Editor, who did 
everything from scheduling pictures to writing late copy, 
the staff began to click as the first of the second semester 
rolled around and there was something to write about. 

A jack-of-all-trades on the book, Ralph was an indis- 
pensable source of enlightenment and hard work. Other 
chapter editors blanketed the copy desk with pages from 
all sections of the book, came back and read proof on 
their section. 



Chosen for their ability to write and their dependabil- 
ity to put across a thought in writing, the chapter editors 
capably fulfilled the requirements. 

Members of the editorial staff were: 

EDITOR Virginia Gingrich 

ASSISTANT EDITOR Ralph Salisbury 

ADMINISTRATION EDITOR Martha Adams 

GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR 

Shirley Hill 

ASSISTANT Marilyn Davis 

HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR 

Barbara King 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR 

Barbara Kellogg 

SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS CO-EDITORS 

Jim Curtis, Ruth Muirhead 

SPORTS EDITOR Duane Patterson 

ASSISTANTS Nancy Munger, Darrell Cowell 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES EDITOR 

- Mary Henson 

ASSISTANTS Ruthe Peg Thackrey, 

Joann Blackwelder 

SENIOR CLASS EDITOR Jean Holmgren 

UNDERCLASS EDITOR Carolyn McNabney 




BIGGEST BONER OF 
THE YEAR, an annual 
title awarded to one of 
the Collegian editors, was 
won (?) last year by fall 
semester editor Helen 
Clegg Petrson. The com- 
mittee at the Publications 
Banquet was unable to 
decide which of the year's 
errors was the worst, so 
Helen and Jack James, 
editor spring of '47, broke 
a wish-bone for the title. 
Shown holding the award, 
the biggest bone, is Doris 
Brewer. 



286 



Spend Many Hours on Book 



~D ESPONSIBLE for the success of the Royal Purple 
Beauty Ball, selling advertising, and supervising the 
office staff, was Business Manager Tom Moreen. Al- 
though graduated at the end of the second semester, 
Tom left very little work to be done following his 
commencement. 

Business staff members were office manager, Jim 
Clinger; advertising manager, Milton Eisenhower, Jr.; 
and advertising staff, Loren D. Compton, Bob Larberg, 
and Benny Stewart. 

Together, they sold the 24 pages of advertising ap- 
pearing in the book, laid out and made up these pages, 
read proof on them, and checked them with the adver- 
tisers. 

Responsible for securing sufficient and competent 
office help for the huge job of filing, indexing and 
typing was Jim Clinger. About 30 volunteers worked 
both semesters for at least two hours a week at the 
detailed office jobs and turned their energies to the 
Beauty Ball, held in February. 

The advertising staff collected over $1100 in local 
advertising, plus letters they wrote to out-of-town ad- 
vertisers. 

Moreen, as business manager, was in charge of all 
photo receipts issued for class individual pictures and 



TOM MOREEN, 1948 
Royal Purple Business 
Manager, capably 
handled the business 
affairs of the book, 
sold advertising and 
directed the original 
plans for the RP Beau- 
ty Ball. He also wrote 
to Samuel Goldwyn, 
asking him to judge 
this year's beauty 
queens. 





the group organization pictures, and the scheduling of 
these. Prices were set in accordance with costs, and 
frequent notices were published in the Collegian re- 
minding stduents of deadline dates to have their pictures 
taken. 

The business manager also signs all contracts with 
printing, engraving, cover and binding companies. 

In the files kept in the Royal Purple office, is the 
card of each student who enrolls in school. These are 
checked by the business manager and his staff to assure 
that those who are entitled to a book, under the present 
program, get one in the spring. 



OVER $1100 AND 24 PAGES of 
advertising were sold by the ad 
vertsing staff. From left to right 
are Loren D. Compton; Milton 
Eisenhower, Jr., advertising man- 
ager; Bob Larbeg and Benny 
Stewart. They also wrote the copy 
and read the proof on these 
pages. 




287 



Pictures for Annual from Five Photographers 




SEEN AT ALL 
SCHOOL FUNCTIONS 
the man with the cam- 
era, Walter Warren, 
head Royal Purple pho- 
tographer, turned out 
prints and enlarge- 
ments of college ac- 
tivities. He was assis- 
ted by Morris Briggs. 
Other pictures were 
taken by Floyd Hanna 
of the illustrations de- 
partment, Lawrence 
Blaker of the Studio 
Royal and Prof. E. T. 
Keith of the journalism 
department. 



T)ICTURES rolled out of darkrooms toward the Royal 
Purple office from early spring last year to early 
spring this year. Complete coverage of a calendar year 
in the 1948 Royal Purple was thus made possible. 

Head photographer for the RP was Walter Warren, 



electrical engineering student. His assistant was Morris 
Briggs. Developing and printing their own pictures, 
the two turned out hundreds of prints and enlargements. 

Special Pictures 

Special pictures were taken by Floyd Hanna of the 
College illustration department; Lawrence Blaker, of 
the Studio Royal; and Prof. E. T. Keith of the journal- 
ism department. Mr. Hanna Scheduled and took all 
group pictures appearing in the book. Mr. Blaker's 
studio handled all individual pictures such as in the 
class sections, and portraits. Most of the photographs 
used in the sports section were taken by Professor Keith. 

A few pictures were purchased from other schools, 
mostly of sports events, and a few faculty members 
and student contributed photographs to the book. Fore- 
most among these was Prof. L. B. Olmstead of the 
agronomy department who took some of the beautiful 
snow pictures and baseball scenes. 



ROYAL PURPLE STAFF — Top row: Martha Adams, Connie Armi- 
tage, Pete Bacon, Carol Bates, Joann Blackwelder, Joanne Brewer, 
Virginia Bryan, Frances Callahan, Jim dinger, L. D. Compton, Mary 
Frances Cooney. Third row: Darrell Cowell, Jim Curtis, Marilyn 
Davis, Milton Eisenhower, Jr., Neil Erdwein, Don Gray, Mary 
Henson, Betty Hinkhouse, Jean Holmgren, Bob Huddelson, Don 
Hueben. Second row: Shirley Hill, Mary Frances Jennings, Maxine 



Keesling, Rodney Keif, Barbara Kellogg, Barbara King, Bob Larberg, 
Carolyn McNabney, Catherine Merrill, Deloris Montague, Ruth Muir- 
head. Bottom row: Nancy Munger, Pat Nelson, Shirley Nichols, 
Duane Patterson, Beverly Pribble, Nancy Schoonover, Nanette Soper, 
Benny Stewart, Ann Thackrey, Peg Knight Thackrey, Gwen Wilson, 
Mary Frances Zink. 




288 




QUEEN FOR A NIGHT, Queen for the year. Royal Purple Business Man- 
ager Tom Moreen, left, presents the yearbook's award to beautiful 



Marilyn Bryan, candidate of Chi Omega sorority. Office Manager Jim din- 
ger stands by with the First Attendant, Ann Uhlrickson of the Tri-Delts. 



Beauty Holds Sway at Royal Purple Ball 



'■"T'WELVE hundred persons danced beneath streamers 
and dimmed lights on February 9 — the night of 
the Royal Purple Beauty Ball. Six hundred couples 
caught their breath as intermission came and the names 
of the queen and her attendants were announced. 

Almost a semester earlier, the business manager had 
begun to fret about the Beauty Ball, and about how 
the queen was to be chosen. With the help of his staff, 
he settled upon Samuel Goldwyn as a logical person to 
know a beautiful girl when he saw one. 

A letter was written. Weeks passed. Finally an 
answer came, saying in effect that Mr. Goldwyn would 
be "most honored" to act as judge. 

The big night came. The gymnasium — ball room 
was beautiful, with decorations in a Valentine theme. 



About 1 1 o'clock, Business Manager Tom Moreen came 
to the microphone with the announcements the crowd 
had been waiting for. "Third attendant," he drawled, 
"is Nina Peck, of Waltheim Hall." 

A little more stalling, a little more suspense and 
petite Jo Best of Waltheim Hall, was announced second 
attendant. Screams went up from Waltheim residents 
when they found that both their candidates had placed 
among the royalty. 

First attendant was Ann Uhlrickson, Delta Delta 
Delta, Moreen announced. More screams. 

Queen of the evening — the Royal Purple Beauty 
Queen for 1948 — Marilyn Bryan, candidate of the Chi 
Omega sorority. 



289 



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Royal Purple 



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Candidates of the sororities and independent orgainzations made it 
difficult for Goldwyn to pick queens. Top row from left to right are: 
Susie Green, Kappa Kappa Gamma; Shirley Barham, Pi Beta Phi; 
Anita Lyness, Kappa Delta. Second row: Mickey Prather, Amicos- 
sembly; Kathleen Carey, Clovia; Madeline Asher, Alpha Xi Delta; 
and bottom, Mila Brown, Amistad. 



294 




Honors Beauty 



Other candidates who helped make Goldwyn's choice difficult are 
top row: Jeannie Hill, Alpha Delta Pi; Judy Gardner, Van Zile Hall; 
Rosemary Barr, Alpha Chi Omega. Second row: Joan Georg, Van 
Zile Hall; Marilyn Moomaw, Amicossembly; Shirley Braman, Amistad; 
and bottom, Lucille Lambert, East Stadium. 



ram 




After several weeks of head-scratching the staff 
of the Royal Purple asked Samuel Goldwyn, one 
of the biggest names in the motion picture pro- 
duction business today, to judge the merits of the 
Royal Purple Beauty Queen candidates. Whether 
or not this busy man would assent was a question 
mark in the minds of the staff, but it only cost 
three cents to send a letter. 

Goldwyn, who picks the Goldwyn girls, some 
of the most widely known beauties in show busi- 
ness, agreed, and chose the queens you see on the 
preceding pages. 

Samuel Goldyn's life story closely parallels 
that of Horatio Alger. He came to the United 
States from Warsaw, Poland, and began his career 
here by working in a glove factory at three dol- 
lars a week. He soon improved his lot, however, 
and started in on the ground floor of the rapidly 
rising new industry — motion pictures. His career 
from this point is a well-known story to the 
American oublic. 






SAMUEL GOLDWYN 

:C4! NORTH FORMOSA AVENUE 
LOS ANGELES 28 



'. ary 21, 19' 



oree - : 

It is o" - suit, and possibly unfair, to 

attempt ti acci nts of any group 

Lisa frora their photographs. The Judge, Lb such 
circumstances, is confronted t the unhappy kncwled e Shat he- 
■:. selection ■ ■ ' " ' ' : " "" '" ' the 

;e, carriage, per. lit , i ther attributes 

. are the essential components o : ■ ■ • He must also face 
- . . . . ■ .. Iven 

.«., . • ,.•:■,, h Lets off tne track, resulting in his doing 

an Injustice to oni i ill' of the young ladies involved; 



ese hasards, 



■') ? , I am s ■ 
the invitation of the Kansas State C< 
r s i what I hop- 
' on on the part of ' jtudenl y, by 

purel, >• i ,; sis of th ph< " ' ' vid< 

Afti - f Lderi : , fc still 

:<; a choice with whicl •' e etui 

•ee. 



.;.■•• ped, I 



I wish to e io tents to all the youi 

ladii .-.-■ e photographs were submitted, and my oongra'tula- 

i s State ' -••. such loveliness 

to adorn its classrooms and campus. 

Sincerely, 



Mr. Thomas R. 'oreen 
Board o& Student Publications 
Kansas State College 
Manhattan, Kansas 







296 




I 



F IT were really possible for a Hill to be blue, I would be. I get that way about this time in the 
spring of every year, and frequently in the middle of the winter, too, when my oldest and best 
friends among the students leave me for other Hills with hardly a backward glance. 



I've done a lot for these kids, they owe me plenty. I've trained them for the great new world the 
faculty is always talking about. I've given them a good education, a good time, a good professional 
reputation. Of course, they have done something for me too. I rest assured that our feeling is mutual. 

They have done their part in scarring my chairs and tables, scuffing my floorboards, wearing paths 
across my well-thatched top, painting campaign signs on my sidewalks. They've found plenty about 
me to gripe about — my employees, my facilities, even the lay of my land. 

But on the other hand — they've worked for me. These seniors have entered into discussions in my 
classrooms, contributed their time to my organizations and activities, and regularly fed me with their 
tuition. Then too, they are good advertisements for me when they go into the "great beyond" of 
other hills. 

Each one forms a small chapter in my life, and I in theirs. I always remember them, and it's like 
spring when I feel their step on me in later years. But, here, I'm getting sentimental. 

Many of these who are leaving me now, I will never see again, and that's what makes me sad. 

They go on and make a life in which I have no part. Sometimes, I think they don't love me any- 

297 



more. But I like to watch them take their first plunge into the cold waters of life "outside," and then 
I know that at times they wish they could come back and re-live the "care-free" days on the Hill. 

I have every confidence in these children of mine. They have great potentialities for making a 
success for themselves and for me. And, of course, I have developed these potentialities. It is my way 
of paying my debt for existing among other hills. 

There is much they have learned on me — not only technical knowledge, but perhaps a little wis- 
dom of the ways of mankind. I know. Who could know better than I? I have watched their growth 
for four or more of their most formative years — and for some for over a decade. Those who went to 
war and then came back to me I particularly welcome, yet I do not hesitate to open my gates to set 
them free from my physical confines. 

Some already have children of their own whom they will turn back to my care some day, and this 
is the thought with which I content myself in their going. 

I can already hear the strains of "Pomp and Circumstance" echoing from wall to wall of the sta- 
dium, and feel the stately tread of the commencement processional. I can see the black mortar boards 
set squarely on knowing young heads, and some heads not so young and not so knowing. 

I can hear the roaring exhortations of the speakers, pushing my students to endeavors beyond my 
power to visualize, and the soft "thank you's" as diplomas are pushed into waiting hands in an assem- 
bly line of black caps and gowns — and feel the quiet tears of parents, who are losing the same thing 
I am. 

Well, that's life. There will be a new crop next year, and the year after that, and I will hate to 
lose them, too. But one thing — for them, I may be out of sight, but what they have learned from 
me will never be out of mind. 




298 



»»,-«. 




Over two hundred seniors took that last long walk from 
Anderson Hall to the Auditorium in a heavy snow the last 
day of January (upper center). President Eisenhower con- 
gratulates a new Bachelor of Science as Deans look on 
(center left). 



240 jbetyteel Ut S+taia 



Mortar boards covered with snow and a curious dog 
mark the end of academic procession (center right). Coeds 
about to become sweet girl graduatesf/cwer left) pat strands 
of hair into place and arrange robes and tassels in the last 
minute before the procession. 



299 





Junior class officers for the school 
year were (upper left) Iris Reed 
Smith, secretary; Betty Rich, vice- 
president; Howard C. Wood, presi- 
dent; Mary Ann Burgwin, treasurer. 

Sophomore class officers this year 
were (upper right) Joan Argabright, 
secretary; Don Bickle, president; Phyl- 
lis Lou Johnson, treasurer; Max Smith, 
vice-president. 



Qiude AU-GoUeye 



Senior class officers were peacefully 
elected in a surprisingly quiet cam- 
paign during the fall semester. Man- 
agers for the senior sneak day, gift to 
Kansas State from the 1948 seniors, 
and other senior affairs are: Irvine 
Gandee, president; Mildred Hall, treas- 
urer; Jane Hackney, secretary; Dave 
Schirmer, vice-president. 



This year's freshman class officers 
were Ann McMillan, secretary. Dean 
Van Valkenburgh, treasurer; Rex 
Stone, president; Gene Ackerman, 
vice-president. 



300 




Prominent Seniors Active in All Schools 

Leader in many activities, MARJORIE KNOSTMAN SCHOWENGERDT (top left) 
. . .Mortar Board. . .Prix. . .Omicron Nu. . .Who' Who. . .I.S.A.. . .S.P.C.. . .Kappa Phi 
. . . 4-H ... Jr. Class Officer. Student Council President, DON FORD ( top center) . . . 
Blue Key . . _Tau Kappa Epsilon ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . S.P.C. ... Pi Epsilon Pi. Mortar 
Board President, BETTY ANN DRAKE (top right) .. .Kappa Kappa Gamma... 
YWCA Cabinet and Committees. . -I.S.A. Past President of the Milling Association, 
MARLO DIRKS (second row left) . . .Alpha Mu. . .Alpha Zeta. . .2.97 grade average 
. . .Phi Lambda Upsilon. . .K-Club. . .Blue Key. . .Jr. Class Officer. . .Who's Who. . . 
Basketball Letterman. Member of Engineering Council, EARL W. COUCHMAN (sec- 
ond row right) . . .Sigma Nu. . .Phi Lambda Upsilon. . .Sigma Tau. . .Steel Ring. . .Pi 
Mu Epsilon . . . Phi Kappa Phi Recognition. Part time politician, PHYLLIS R. EVANS 
(center right) . . .Young Republicans. .-Student Council. . .National Student Associa- 
tion delegate . . . Phi Alpha Mu . . -Mortar Board . . . Prix . . . YWCA . . . Chi Omega. Two 
term Student Councilman, DICK WARREN (second from bottom) . . .Dairy Club. . . 
YMCA . . . K-State Players . . . I.S.A. . . . 4-H Publications Staffs . . . Chaparajos . . . Amistad 
. . .Outstanding on Judging Teams. . .Who's Who. Open House manager, "DICK" 
SIZEMORE (bottom) . . .Blue Key. . .Steel Ring. . .Sigma Tau. . .Engineering Council 
. . -Who's Who . . . Cosmopolitan Club. 

301 





A popular and scholarly engineer, LOYD E. PETER- 
SON .. . Blue Key . . . Who's Who . . . Freshman 
Phi Kappa Phi . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Etta Kappa 
Nu . . . Engineering Council . . . Sigma Tau . . . 
Band . . . Steel Ring. 



ABBEY, CHARLES E. . . . 

Business Administration 



Newton 



ABED, KHALED Y. . . Damascus, Syria 
Agricultural Administration 

ADAMS, FRANKLIN A., JR. . . Salina 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Student Council Comm. 

for Assemblies; Interfrat. Council; Interim. 

Pledge Council. 

ADAMS, GEORGE E., JR. . . Horton 

Soil Conservation 
Alpha Tau Omega; Klod and Kernel Klub; 
Collegiate 4-H; YMCA. 

ADAMS, GEORGE F Salina 

Chemical Engineering 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma 
Tau; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Tau Beta Pi. 

ADAMS, J. PATRICIA .... Eureka 
Home Economics and Education 
Home Ec Club; I.S.A.; Collegiate 4-H, Sec. 3; 
Wesley Foundation; Kappa Phi; YWCA. 

ADAMS, MARTHA J. . . . Belleville 

Industrial Journalism 
Alpha Xi Delta; Quill Club, Treas. 3; Kap- 
pa Beta; Student Union Comm.; Panhellenic 
Council; YWCA. 



ADAMSON, LUCILLE F. . . 

Industrial Chemistry 



Coffeyville 



Belleville 



ADEE, LAWRENCE E. . . 

Chemical Engineering 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi Lambda Upsilon; A.I. 
Ch.E.; Engineers' Open House, Chem. Engr. 
Chr. 

ADEE, LOWELL E Topeka 

Florticulture and Ornamental Horticulture 
Horticulture Club, Vice-Pres.; Horticulture 
Show, Chairman; Block and Bridle; Ma- 
sonic Club; Wampus Cats; Ag Barnwarmer 
Comm. 

ADEE, MYRNA J Topeka 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Kappa Phi; Annex III, Vice-Pres. 2; Coed 
Court, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Amicossembly; 
Wesley Foundation Council; Eastern Star; 
I.S.A. 



ADELL, JEROME L. . 

Option B 



Manhattan 



ADRIAN, KENNETH R. 

Miles City, Mont. 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; Pi Mu Epsilon; A.I.E.E.; I.R.E. 

ALBRIGHT, JAMES A Sylvia 

Electrical Engineering 

ALBRITTON, DOROTHYE J. 

Little Rock, Ark. 

Agronomy, Garduate Student 

ALFORD, LYNN B. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E., Vice- 
Pres. 4; Soph. Class Pres. 

ALLEN, GLEN G Topeka 

Agricultural Administration 
Alpha Zeta, Treas. 4; Ag Ec Club, Vice-Pres. 
4; Intramurals. 

ALLEN, LELAND J. . . . Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering 

ALLMAN, LEROY E. . . . Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Nu; Radio Guild; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Who's Who; Publication Award; Collegian, 
Editor 4, Bus, Mgr. 3; Journalism Memorial 
Fund Award. 

AMSTUTZ, JOAN McD. . . Manhattan 

Home Economics and Social Welfare 
Chi Omega; YWCA; Intramurals. 

ANCELL, DARRELL D. . . Sylvan Grove 

Industrial Physics 
Masonic Club; Math Club; Veterans' Assn.; 
Westminister Foundation; Amistad; Intra- 
murals; YMCA. 

ANDERSEN, BERNHARDT V. . Bird City 

Industrial Chemistry 

ANDERSON, JOHN H. . . . Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E. 

ANDERSON, WILLIAM F. . . Manhattan 
Option A 
K-State Players; Phi Kappa Phi; Radio Guild, 
Vice-Pres. 4. 

ANDREA, WALTER G Keats 

Business Administration 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; A.S.M.E.; Band. 

ANGLEMYER, MARTIN J. 

ELDORADO 

Agricultural Engineering 
A Cappella; Alpha Phi Omega. 

APPLING, E. BRUCE .... Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

ARMSTRONG, ARCHIE E. . . Seneca 

Biological Science 
Phi Kappa; Newman Club; Clinic Club. 

ASKINS, KEITH A Pittsburg 

Electrical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta. 

BABB, HOWARD F. . . . Manhattan 
Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E. 

BABCOCK, H. DUANE . . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Beta Theta Pi; Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; 
Engineering Council, Vice-Pres. 3; A.S.M.E.; 
Intramurals. 

BABSON, ROBERT T. . . Worcester, Mass. 
Option B 

BACHELOR, WILLIAM B. . . Belleville 

Electrical Engineering 

BADLEY, JOANN S. . . . Manhattan 

Option A 

Pi Beta Phi; Radio Guild; Phi Chi Delta; 

K-State Players; Publ. Award; Phi Kappa 

Phi Fresh. Recog.; Intramurals; YWCA. 



BAIER, ROBERT L Salina 

Civil Engineering 

BAKER, JAMES D Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Business Club. 

BAKER, JOHN T. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa Phi. 

BALDWIN, LOIS L Anthony 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta; Eastern Star. 

BANOWETZ, LEONARD F. 

New Orleans, La. 

Chemical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta; Pi Kappa Delta; Alpha Phi 
Omega; Pi Epsilon Pi, Pres. 2; Phi Rho Pi; 
Newman Club; A.I.Ch.E.; Cheerleader; De- 
bate Team; King of Pep; K-State Engr. Staff; 
Publ. Award; Veterans' Assn.; Holidays 
Comm.; Org. Control Board; All College 
Mixer Comm.; Reserve Officers' Assn.; 
Engineers' Open House; Football 1; Track 1; 
Intramurals; YMCA. 

BARB, GLEN W Augusta 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Intramurals. 

BARBER, ROBERT V. . . . Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

BARHAM, HAROLD N, JR. . . Manhattan 

Milling Chemistry 

BARHAM, JEAN S. . . . . Manhattan 

Option A 
Quill Club. 

BARNES, ORVILLE C Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 

BARNETT, IRVIN S Morland 

Civil Engineering 

BAYS, OLGA W Wichita 

History, Graduate Student 

BAYSINGER, ROY F Emporia 

Electrical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu; Pi Mu Epsilon. 

BEACH, ARTHUR J. . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Chemical Engineering 

BEAR, HARMOND P Abilene 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; Sigma Tau. 

BEARDMORE, JEAN H. . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
BEARMAN, CHARLES H. . . Manhattan 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Vice-Pres. 4; Willis- 
ton Geology Club, Treas. 3. 

BEAVER, RODNEY C Ottawa 

Industrial Physics 

BEBERMEYER, MARY ANN . Robinson 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 
Radio Club; Home Ec Club; Hospitality 
Days' Comm.; Eastern Star; Jr. Mortar 
Board Recog; Intramurals; YWCA. 

BECK, PATRICIA L Manhattan 

Biological Science 

BECKETT, JAMES E Wichita 

Architectural Engineering 

BECKMAN, MARTHA M. . . Topeka 

Business Administration 
Pi Beta Phi, Treas. 2, 3, 4; Purple Pepsters, 
Vice-Pres. 3; Wesley Foundation; Business 
Club; I.S.A.; Phi Sigma Chi, Nat'l. Vice- 
Pres. 4; Apportionment Board, Sec. 4; Intra- 
murals YWCA. 



Abbey, Charles E. 
Abed, Khaled Y. 
Adams, Franklin A., Jr. 
Adams, George E., Jr. 
Adams, George F. 
Adams, J. Patricia 
Adams, Martha J. 



Adamson, Lucile F. 
Adee, Lawrence E. 
Adee, Lowell E. 
Adee, Myrna J. 
Adell, Jerome L. 
Adrian, Kenneth R. 
Albright, James A. 



Albritton, Dorothye J. 
Alford, Lynn B. 
Allen, Glen G. 
Allen, Leland J. 
Allman, LeRoy E. 
Amstutz, Joan McD. 
Ancell, Darrel D. 



Anderson, Bernhardt V. 
Anderson, John H. 
Anderson, William F. 
Andrea, Walter G. 
Anglemyer, Martin J. 
Appling, E. Bruce 
Armstrong, Archie E. 



Askins, Keith A. 
Babb, Howard F. 
Babcock, H. Duane 
Babson, Robert T. 
Bachelor, William B. 
Badley, JoAnn S. 
Baier, Robert L. 



Baker, James D. 
Baker, John T. 
Baldwin, Lois L. 
Banowetz, Leonard F. 
Barb, Glen W. 
Barber, Robert V. 
Barham, Harold, Jr. 



Barham, Jean S. 
Barnes, Orville C. 
Barnett, Irwin S. 
Bays.OlgaW. 
Baysinger, Roy F. 
Beach, Arthur J. 
Bear, Harmond P. 



Beardmore, Jean H. 
Bearman, Charles H. 
Beaver, Rodney C. 
Bebermeyer, Mary Ann 
Beck, Patricia L. 
Beckett, James E. 
Beckman, Martha M. 

303 





Prominent in student politics, ANN HUDDLESTON 
. . . Student Council . . . S.P.C. . . . I.S.A. . . . 
YWCA . . .Theta Epsilon . . . Past Class Officer . . . 
Pi Beta Phi . . . Publications awards. 



BEESON, DONALD M. . . Coffeyville 

Industrial Chemistry 
Phi Lambda Upsilon; A.Ch.S. 

BEIM, LOUISE Phillipsburg 

Option A 
K-State Players; Nat'l. Col. Players; I.S.A.; 
Y.W.C.A.; Collegiate 4-H; Amicossembly; 
Math Club; Modern Dance Club. 



BELLAIRS, HAROLD L. . 

Milling Industry 



Manhattan 



BELLINGER, ALBERT L. . . Junction City 

Chemical Engineering and Business Administration 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

BELLINGER, CARNOT E. . . Junction City 

Chemical Engineering 
A.I.Ch.E.; Newman Club. 

BENNETT, JOAN A Haviland 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Kappa Delta; Home Ec Club; Orchestra; 
Band; Kappa Phi; Hospitality Days' Comm.; 
Home Ec Fresh. Counselor; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 

BENNETT, M. PRUDENCE . . Marysville 

Option B 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



BENTLEY, THOMAS B Colby 

Dairy Production 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Dairy Club, Pres. 4; 
Collegiate 4-H; Dairy Judging Team. 



BERG, FLORENE F. . 

Option B 
Phems. 



McPherson 



BERGER, DALE V Abilene 

Option A 
Pi Kappa Alpha, vice-pres. 3; Pi Epsilon 
Delta, pres. 4; Radio Guild; A Cappella; 
UNESCO; K-State Players; Band; Wesley 
Foundation; Intramurals. 

BERGNER, JEAN M Pratt 

Business Administration 
Collegiate 4-H; Orchestra; Business Club; 
Intramurals; YWCA. 

BERGSTROM, DONALD M. . . Ness City 

Civil Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta, pres. 4; A.S.C.E.; Intra- 
murals; YMCA. 

BERNASEK, FRANK E. . . Summerfield 
Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub. 



BERRY, DOROTHY B. . . . Wichita 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta. 

BERRY, ROBERT J. . . . Dodge City 

Physical Education 
Phi Epsilon Kappa; K Fraternity; Varsity 
Football 2, 3, 4. 

BETTINGER, JOSEPH L. . Rochester, N. Y. 

Mechanical Engineering 
Phi Kappa, A.S.M.E.; Newman Club; Intra- 
murals. 

BICKNELL, BETTY L . . . Kansas City 

Industrial Journalism 
Chi Omega; Radio Guild; Purple Pepsters; 
Cheer Leader; Panhellenic Council, Vice- 
Pres. 4; Sec. 3; Homecoming Queen First 
Attendant 3. 

BIEBERLY, WALTER L. . . Dodge City 

Agronomy 
Collegiate 4-H; Klod and Kernel Klub; New- 
man Club. 

BIERY, ERNEST R Stockton 

Business Administration 
Business Club; Varsity Basketball; Intra- 
murals; YMCA. 

BILLIARD, ARTHUR T. . . . Girard 

Mechanical Engineering 

BILLIARD, FRANCIS E. . . . Girard 

Agricultural Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A.S.A.E., Sec-Treas 4. 

BINDER, JULIUS F Hays 

Agriculture 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Block and Bridle; New- 
man Club; Collegiate 4-H. 

BISCHOFF, GEORGINE A. . . Abilene 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 

BISHOP, HOWARD L. . . Kansas City 

Electrical Enginering 
Eta Kappa Nu. 

BISHOP MILDRED S. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Industrial Journalism 

BLACK, HAROLD T Reece 

Agriculture 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

BLACK, LESLIE Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 
Theta Sigma Phi; Club Cervantes; Quill 
Club; Senior Honors; Collegian Staff; Publ. 
Award. 

BLAKE, WILLIAM O. . . . Clay Center 

Electrical Engineering 

BLOOD, ROY V Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
I.R.E.; A Cappella; Glee Club; Orchestra; 
Band; Intramurals. 

BLYSTONE, EDNA J. . . . Kanorado 
Home Economics and Education 
Collegiate 4-H. 

BOGUE, ROBERT E. . . . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

BOHNENBLUST, GENE F. . . Longford 

Agricultural Engineering 
A.S.A.E., Pres. 4; Engineering Council; Engi- 
neers' Open House Comm.; Collegiate 4-H. 

BOLTON, J. VAUGHN . Waterville 
Industrial Journalism 

BONDURANT, DEWEY T . . Ness City 
Agricultural Engineering 
Steel Ring; Sigma Tau; A.S.A.E., Pres. 4; 
Sophomore Honors; Intramurals. 

BONNEL, DELBERT W. . . Beaumont 
Medical Technology 



BORCHARDT, HOWARD W. 



Leavenworth 



Landscape Design 



Farm House, Pres. 4; Alpha Zeta; Blue Key, 
Sec. 4; Horticulture Club, Pres. 3; Ag Assn., 
Vice-Pres. 4; L.S.A.; Collegiate 4-H, Vice- 
Pres. 3. 

BORTHWICK, DON R Beeler 

Business Administration 
Alpha Tau Omega; Track; Intramurals. 

BORTHWICK, JO ANN D. . . Dorrance 

Institutional Management and Dietetics 
Sigma Alpha Iota; Home Ec Club; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

BOWLIN, DALE F Lebo 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma, Treas. 4; A.S.M.E. 

BOWMAN, B. PHIL Linn 

Physical Science 
Tau Kappa Epsilon, Pres. 3; Eta Kappa Nu; 
K Fraternity; Phi Kappa Phi; Fresh Recog.; 
Football 2. 

BOWSER, ESTYL O Caney 

Home Economics and Education 

BOYD, HURSHAL E Chase 

Soil Conservation 



BRADLEY, MARY K. . . . Ft. Riley 

Arts and Sciences 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

BRAINARD, KATHRYN V. . . Carlyle 

Clothing and Retailing 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Home Ec Service 
Club, Ch. 3; Home Ec Club, Pres. 4; Hospi- 
tality Days' Comm.; Intramurals; YWCA. 

BRAMAN, SHIRLEY C. . . Manhattan 

Home Economics and Art 
Amistad; Phi Chi Delta; Creative Arts Ch.; 
UNESCO; Service Club; Hospitality Days' 
Comm.; YWCA. 

BREWER, DORIS M. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Industrial Journalism 
Pi Beta Phi, Sec 4; Quill Club, Sec. 4; 
Theta Sigma Phi, Pres. 4; Canterbury Club; 
Publ. Award; Collegian, Society Editor 3; 
SPC; College Activity Calendar Comm.; Or- 
chesis; Intramurals; YWCA. 

BREWER, JOHN A. . . . Miltonvale 

Civil Engineering 

BROOKS, RALPH S. . . . Coffeyville 
Industrial Arts 

BROOKS, RICHARD H. . . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma, Sec. 4; A.S.M.E., Treas. 4; 
Intramurals. 



BROSS, BARBARA M. . . . Manhattan 
Indutsrial Journalism 
Delta Delta Delta, Sec. 4; Purple Pepsters; 
K-State Players; Glee Club; Collegian Staff; 
Student Planning Comm.; Phi Chi Delta; 
Radio Guild, Sec. 4; Student Evaluation 
Comm.; Publ. Award; Intramurals; YWCA. 

BROWN, HARRY E. ... El Dorado 

Civil Engineering 
BROWN, JAMES M. . . . Greensburg 

Mechanical Engineering 

BROWN, ROBERT G Oakley 

Milling Administration 
Alpha Gamma Rho; Interfrat Council; Mill- 
ing Assn.; YMCA. 

BROWN, VIRGINIA H. . . Kansas City 

Physical Education 
BRUNER EUGENE H. . . . Paradise 

Business Administration 
Alpha Tau Omega; Business Club; Intra- 
murals; YMCA. 

BRUNNEMER, GENEVA B. . Glen Elder 
Business Administration 
Business Club; Eastern Star; YWCA. 






Beson, Donald M. 
Beim, G. Louise 
Bellairs, Harold L. 
Bellinger, Albert L. 
Bellinger, Carnot E. 
Bennett, Joan A. 
Bennett, M. Prudence 



Bentley, Thomas B. 
Berg, Florence F. 
Berger, Dale V. 
Bergner, Jean M. 
Bergstrom, Donald M. 
Bernasek, Frank E. 
Berry, Dorothy B. 



Berry, Robert J. 
Bettinger, Joseph L. 
Bicknell, Betty L. 
Bieberly, Walter L. 
Biery, Ernest R. 
Billiard, Arthur T. 
Billiard, Francis E. 



Binder, Julius F. 
Bischoff , Georgine A. 
Bishop, Howard L. 
Bishop, Mildrd S. 
Black, Harold T. 
Black, Leslie 
Blake, William O. 



Blood, Roy V. 
Blystone, Edna J. 
Bogue, Robert E. 
Bohnenblust, Gene F. 
Bolton, J. Vaughn 
Bondurant, Dewey T. 
Bonnel, Delbert W. 



Borchardt, Howard W. 
Borthwick, Don R. 
Borthwick, JoAnn D. 
Bowlin, Dale F. 
Bowman, B. Phil 
Bowser, Estyl O. 
Boyd, Hurshal E. 



Bradley, Mary K. 
Brainard, Kathryn V. 
Braman, Shirley C. 
Brewer, Doris M. 
Brewer, John A. 
Brooks, Ralph S. 
Brooks, Richard H. 



Bross, Barbara M. 
Brown, Harry E. 
Brown, James M. 
Brown, Robert G. 
Brown, Virginia H. 
Bruner, Eugene H. 
Brunnemer, Geneva B. 

305 





Awarded every possible honor, RICHARD P. MED- 
LIN . . . Blue Key . . . Sigma Tau ... Phi Lambda 
Upsilon ... Phi Kappa Phi . . . Engineering Coun- 
cil .. . S.P.C. . . . Student Union Committee . . . 
Steel Ring. 



BRYANT, NANCY L. . . . Haviknd 

Home Economics and Education 
Home Ec Club; Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog.; YWCA. 

BUCKLES, GLORIA LEE . . Kansas City 
Option A 
Alpha Delta Pi; Club Cervantes, V-Pres. 4; 
UNESCO; YWCA. 

BUGEL, LUCILE M. . . Superior, Wis. 

Textiles and Clothing, Graduate 

BUNGE, MARJORIE .... Waverly 

Clothing Retailing 
Kappa Phi; Home Ec Club; YWCA. 

BURKHEAD, BERDETEA . . . Beloit 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 

BURKHEAD, ILAH Beloit 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta. 



BURKHEAD, MELVIN S. . 

Agriculture 



Beloit 



BURNS, RICHARD M Topeka 

Animal Husbandry 
Kappa Sigma; Sigma Delta Chi; Block & 
Bridle; Plow & Pen Club; Congregational 
Student Fellowship, Pres., Sec; SPC Delegate 
Religious Feder. Council; Collegiate 4-H; 4-H 
Yearbook Ed.; ISA; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. 
Recog..; A Cappella; Ag Student, Assoc. Ed.; 
Royal Purple and Collegian Staffs; Publ. 
Award; Natl. Grand Scribe Award; Swift 
Essay Winner; YMCA. 

BURTON, JEAN A. . . . Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering 

BUSHNELL, JOHN M., JR. . Independence 

Electrical Enginering 
Radio Guild, Vice-Pres. 3; Canterbury Club; 
I.R.E., Pres 4; Scabbard and Blade; Engi- 
neering Council. 

BUXTON, JOHN B. . . . Cherryvale 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E.; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog. 

CABLE, LOUIS R Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E. 

CAREY, C. ARTHUR .... Wichita 

Poultry Husbandry 
Poultry Science Club. 



CAREY, VIVIAN B Mankato 

Home Economics 
Kappa Beta; 4-H Club; YWCA. 

CARINDER, WILLIAM J. . . Chanute 

Poultry Husbandry 
Kappa Sigma; Poultry Club, Vice-Pres. 4. 

CARLOS, ROBERT M. . . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 

CARLSON, ALAN D. . . . Lindsborg 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 

CARPENTER, FRANK R. . . Stockton 

Agricultural Education 
Phi Delta Kappa; Ag Ed Club, Pres. 3 
Poultry Science Club; Block and Bridle 
Alpha Zeta; Jr. Livestock Judging Team 
Intramurals. 

CARTER, DALE H Louisburg 

Mechanical Engineering 

CARTER, NOBLE Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 

CARTTAR, BARBARA A. . . Winfield 

Home Economics 
Alpha Delta Pi; Omicron Nu, Vice-Pres.; 
Home Ec Club; SPC; Hospitality Days' 
Comm.; Fresh. Counselor; Intramurals. 



CARVER, IRVA S Manhattan 

Option A 
Pi Beta Phi; Honorary Cadet Colonel 3. 

CASADY, ALFRED J. . . Independence 

Soil Conservation 

CASE, ROLAND W. . . Independence 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; K-Fraternity; A.S.M.E.; En- 
gineers' Open House; Golf Team 2, 3. 

CASTLE, EMERY N Oxford 

Agricultural Administration 
Ag Ec Club, Pres. 4; Alpha Zeta; Ag Stu- 
dent Staff, Asst. Ed., Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

CATHERS, BENJAMIN E. . Wellington 

Chemical Engineering 

CERANICH, JOHN M. . . Kansas City 

Business Administration 

CHAPPELL, GREGG L. . Newkirk, Okla. 

Mechaanical Engineering 



CHILDERS, MAXINE M. . . . Mission 

Industrial Journalism 
Alpha Delta Pi; Purple Pepsters. 

CHITWOOD, JOHN L., JR. . . Manhattan 

Physical Science 
Kappa Sigma. 

CLAAR, SAMUEL E. . . Greeley, Colo. 

Agriculture 

CLARK, JAMES W Logan 

Physical Science 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Sigma Gamma Epsilon; 
Williston Geology Club; Collegiate 4-H; 
A Cappella; Intramurals. 

CLARK, JOHN E El Dorado 

Physical Science 

CLARK, KATE E Mayfield 

Home Economics 
Clovia, Treas. 2, 3, 4; Collegiate 4-H; Home 
Ec Club; Theta Epsilon, Vice-Pres. 4; Fresh. 
Counselor; UNESCO; YWCA. 

CLARK, LAURENCE R. . . Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



CLARK, ROBERT A. . . Smith Center 
Civil Engineering 

CODER, EARL R Greenleaf 

Business Administration 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Veterans' Coop 
Ex, Pres. 1. 

COLEMAN, ROGER D. . . Larkinburg 

Agriculture 

COLEMAN, ROY J Horton 

Industrial Chemistry 

COLLIER, JAMES M. . . . Alta Vista 

Animal Husbandry 
Alpha Gamma Rho; Block and Bridle, Pres. 
4; Collegiate 4-H; Livestock Judging Team. 

COLLINS, DORIS A Salina 

Option A 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Frog Club; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

COLLINS, LAWRENCE K. . Junction City 

Agricultural Engineering 
Pi Kappa Tau; Scarab; Steel Ring; K- 
Fraternity; Engineers' Open House Comm., 
Chr. Ag Eng.; Varsity Wrestling. 



COLLINS, RICHARD V. . 

Physics, Graduate 



Salina 



COLLINS, SHERWOOD C. . . Dwight 

Option A 

Kappa Sigma; Radio Guild; K-State Players; 

Wampus Cats; Publ. Award; Big Six Bridge 

Tournament, 2nd place; YMCA Cabinet. 

COLLISTER, MARY K. . . Manhattan 

Music Education 
Delta Delta Delta, Sec; A Cappella; Pro- 
musica; Newman Club; YWCA. 

COLTRAIN, WAYNE O. . . Neodesha 

Agricultural Education 
Collegiate 4-H; Who's Whoot Staff; Ag Ec 
Club, Vice-Pres. 4; Varsity Wrestling. 

COMFORT, WILLIAM D. . . . Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 

CONDRY, CARSON E. . . Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 

CONELY, GERALD W. . . Arkansas City 
Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 



CONN, JAMES F Osborne 

Milling Industry 

COOK, EARL C Winfield 

Business Administration 
Business Club. 

COOK, KEITH L. . . . Houstonia, Mo. 
Civil Engineering 
Pi Kappa Alpha; A.S.C.E.; Pi Omega Pi; 
K-State Engr. Staff; Fresh. Football; Intra- 
murals. 

COOPER, ARTHUR G. 

Galena Park, Texas 
Business Administration 

CORKE, KENNETH R. . . . Studley 

Animal Husbandry 

Block and Bridle; Baptist Youth Fellowship. 

COTTON, DOROTHY . . . Manhattan 

Home Economics 

COTTON, MAURICE E. . McCook, Nebr. 

Industrial Journalism 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Radio Guild; Sigma Delta 
Chi. 



Bryant, Nancy L. 
Buckles, Gloria Lee 
Bugel, Lucile M. 
Bunge, Marjorie 
Burkhead, Berdetta 
Burkhead, Ilah 
Burkhead, Melvin S. 



Burns, Richard McV. 
Burton, Jean A. 
Bushnell, John M., Jr. 
Buxton, John B. 
Cable, Louis R. 
Carey, C. Arthur 
Carey, Vivian B. 



Carinder, William J. 
Carlos, Robert M. 
Carlson, Alan D. 
Carpenter, Frank R. 
Carter, Dale H. 
Carter, Noble 
Carttar, Barbara A. 



Carver, Irva S. 
Casady, Alfred J. 
Case, Roland W. 
Castle, Emery N. 
Cathers, Benjamin E. 
Ceranich, John M. 
Chappell, Gregg L. 



Childers, Maxine M. 
Chitwood, John L., Jr. 
Claar, Samuel E. 
Clark, James W. 
Clark, John E. 
Clark, Kate E. 
Clark, Laurence R. 



Clark, Robert A. 
Coder, Earl R. 
Coleman, Roger D. 
Coleman, Roy J. 
Collier, James M. 
Collins, Doris A. 
Collins, Lawrence K. 



Collins, Richard V. 
Collins, Sherwood C. 
Collister, Mary K. 
Coltrain, Wayne O. 
Comfort, William D. 
Condry, Carson E. 
Conely, Gerald W. 



Conn, James F. 
Cook, Earl C. 
Cook, Keith L. 
Cooper, Arthur G. 
Corke, Kenneth R. 
Cotton, Dorothy L. 
Cotton, Maurice E. 

307 

















All around leader, CHARLOTTE MARIE DORF . . . 
Mortar Board ... Phi Alpha Mu . . . Prix . . . Alpha 
Delta Theta . . . Alpha Xi Delta . . . K-State Play- 
ers .. . S.P.C. ... Phi Kappa Phi . . . Who's Who 
. . . I.S.A. . . YWCA. 



COUCHMAN, EARL W. . . . Wichita 

Chemical Engineering 
Sigma Nu, Pres. 4; Phi Lambda Upsilon, 
Pres. 4; Sigma Tau, Sec. 4; Pi Mu Epsilon; 
Steel Ring; Engineering Council, Sec. 4; Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

COWAN, BENN Ransom 

Civil Engineering 

COX, WILBERT M Salina 

Business Administration 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; I.S.A.; Wesley Foun- 
dation; Intramurals; YMCA. 

COY, RICHARD V Horton 

Business Administration 
Band; Orchestra. 

CRABB, JOHN A. . . Independence, Mo 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Promusica; Band. 

CRABB, MADGE A Lyons 

Music Education 
Promusica; Band; Chorus; Am. Guild of 
Organists. 

CRAVEN, MARY K. . . . Manhattan 
Home Economics 



CRAWFORD, BETTY J. . . Hutchinson 

Business Administration 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

CRAWFORD, L. BRYCE . . Dodge City 

Biological Science 

CRAWSHAW, STANLEY M. . Osborne 

Physical Education 
Phi Epsilon Kappa, Treas. 4; Sophomore 
Honors. 

CROSS, WILLIS E Hamilton 

Home Economics and Education 
Clovia; Kappa Phi; Collegiate 4-H; Home 
Ec Club; YWCA. 

CURRIER, MARSHALL J. . . Topeka 

Architectural Engineering 

CURRY, ROBERT L. . . Arkansas City 

Chemical Engineering 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Football. 

CURTIS, JAMES J. . . . Junction City 

Physical Science 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Wampus Cats. 



DAHL, RICHARD S. . . . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 



DAHLSTEN, PAUL W. . . Marquette 
Agronomy 
Dairy Club; Klod and Kernel Klub; Little 
Am. Royal; R.O.T.C. Band; Lutheran Stud- 
dent Assn.; Concordia Club; Intramurals. 

DAMERON, HELEN D. . Minneapolis 

Home Economics and Journalism 
Prix; Theta Epsilon; Baptist Youth Fellow- 
ship; Hospitality Days' Steering Comm.; 
SPC; Home Ec Club; Sears Home Ec Scholar- 
ship; Intramurals; YWCA. 

DAVENPORT, JOHN S. . . El Dorado 

Mechanical Engineering 
Kappa Sigma; A.S.M.E. 

DAVID, LEONARD E. ... Norton 

Business Admanistration 

DAVIS, ARLENE E. . . . Manhattan 

Home Economics 

DAVIS, JOHN E., JR. . Beardstown, 111. 

Milling Industry 
Kappa Sigma. 



DAVIS, MARILYN B. . . . Hazleton 

Industrial Journalism 
Theta Sigma Phi, Sec. -Treas. 4; A Cappella; 
I.S.A.; Royal Purple Staff. 

DAVIS, ROY, JR Mentor 

Electrical Engineering and Business Administration 
Kappa Sigma; Pi Tau Sigma; I.S.A. ; Intra- 
murals. 

DAVIS, WILLIAM R. ... Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 

DAWSON, GALEN D. . . . Wichita 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E. 

DELAY, EARL F., JR Parsons 

Mechanical Engineering 
Theta Xi; A.S.M.E.; Intramurals. 

DEMARS, LLOYD J. . . . Concordia 

Business Administration 
Business Club; Newman Club; Varsity Foot- 
ball; Intramurals. 

DENTON, LELAND G. . . . Ft. Scott 

Business Administration 



DEPEW, DON D Neodesha 

Architectural Engineering 
Engineering Council, A. I. A., Vice-Pres. 3; 
Student Arch. Assn., Pres. 4. 

DEWYKE, KEITH C. . . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Business Club; Amistad. 

DICK, BETTYE JO Wichita 

Clothing Retailing 
Waltheim Hall, Pres. 4, Sec. 3; Kappa Phi; 
YWCA. 

DIGGLE, NANCY J Mission 

Industrial Journalism 
Pi Beta Phi, Sec. 3; Phi Alpha Mu; Mortar 
Board, Pres. 4; Theta Sigma Phi, Pres. 4; 
Prix, Sec-Treas. 3; Who's Who; Publ. Award; 
Collegian, Editor 3; Comm. on Evaluation 
of Teaching; Student Union Comm. 

DIRKS, B. MARLO . . . Moundridge 

Milling Chemisrty 
Alpha Mu, Sec. 3; Vice-Pres. 4; Blue Key, 
Vice-Pres. 4; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Alpha 
Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; Milling Assn., Pres. 3; 
K-Fraternity; Who's Who; Jr. Class Pres.; 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Alpha Zeta 
Fresh. Award; Alpha Mu Fres. Award; Var- 
sity Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,. 

DOLL, DONNA O Larned 

Home Economics 
Phi Chi Delta; Christian Youth Fellowship; 
Religious Feder., Treas. 3; Home Ec Club; 
Westminister Foundation, Treas. 2. 

DONNELLAN, QUENTIN A. . Emporia 

Electrical Engineering and Business Administration 
A.I.E.E., Pres. 4; Engineering Council. 



DONOVAN, EDWIN S. . . Manhattan 
Option B 

DORF, CHARLOTTE M. . Manhattan 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Xi Delta; Alpha Delta Theta, Treas. 
2, Nat'l. Historian, Pres. 4; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Prix, Pres 3; Mortar Board; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Who's Who; K-State Players; Lutheran Stu- 
dent Assn., Vice-Pres. 3; SPC; UNESCO; 
YWCA. 

DOUGLAS, JEAN .... Winfield 

Industrial Journalism 
Kappa Delta; Radio Guild; ISA; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 

DOUGLASS, G. LOREN . Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering 

Delta Tau Delta, Sec. 3; Pi Tau Sigma; Sigma 

Tau; A.S.M.E., Treas. 2; Engineers' Open 

House Comm. 

DRAKE, ELIZABETH A. . Humboldt 

Option B 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; ISA; Mortar Board, 
Pres. 4; YWCA, Pres. 4. 

DRAYER, BARBARA . . Manhattan 
Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Eta Chi. 



DRAYER, DONALD W. 

Physical Science 



Manhattan 



DRONBERGER, DALE . . Kansas City 

Architectural Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Steel Ring; A. I. A.; Architects' 
Ass'n.; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog. 

DUBBS, FLORENCE M. . . . Ransom 

Architecture 
Architects' Ass'n.; Kappa Beta, Sec. 3; Con- 
gregational Student Fellowship; Purple Pep- 



sters. 



Clay Center 



Richmond 



DUDLEY, EARL D. . . . 

Civil Engineering 

DUNBAR, MIRIAM . . 

Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; Wesley Foundation; Collegiate 
4-H; Home Ec Radio Club; Fresh. Counselor; 
Intramurals; YWCA. 

DUNGAN, MARVIN E. . Leavenworth 

Business Administration 
Sigma Nu; K-Fraternity; Varsity Tennis 3, 4. 

DUPHORNE, JUNE . . Sharon Springs 

Industrial Journalism 
Theta Sigma Phi; Phi Alpha Mu; Collegiate 
4-H; Cosmopolitan Club; Wesley Founda- 
tion; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh, and Jr. Recog. 

DURST, HAROLD E. . . Morrowville 

Biological Science 



DUWE, MILDRED A. . . . Manhattan 
Option A 
Pi Beta Phi; Club Cervantes. 

DYKEMAN, JOAN . . . Wellington 
Biological Science 
Chi Omega; Alpha Delta Theta; Pumpkin 
Queen 4; Chapel Comm. 

EARL, JOHN H Fall River 

Physical Science 

EASTON, WILLIAM J., JR. . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Kappa Sigma; A.S.M.E. 

EATON, FRANCIS M. . . Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering 

EDWARDS, CHARLES S. . . Richmond 

Agricultural Engineering 
A.S.M.E 

EDWARDS, RAY N, JR. . Manhattan 
Option B 



Couchman, Earl W. 
Cowan, Benn 
Cox, Wilbert M. 
Coy, Richard V. 
Crabb, John A. 
Crabb, Madge A. 
Craven Mary K. 



Crawford, Betty J. 
Crawford, L. Bryce 
Crawshaw, Stanley 
Cross, Willis E. 
Currier, Marshall J. 
Curry, Robert L. 
Curtis, James J. 



Dahl, Richard S. 
Dahlsten, Paul W. 
Dameron, Helen D. 
Davenport, John S. 
David, Leonard E. 
Davis, Arlene E. 
Davis, John E., Jr. 



Davis, Marilyn B. 
Davis, Roy, Jr. 
Davis, William R. 
Dawson, Galen D. 
DeLay, Earl F., Jr. 
DeMars, Lloyd J. 
Denton, Leland G. 



Depew, Don D. 
DeWyke, Keith C. 
Dick, Bettye Jo 
Diggle, Nancy J. 
Dirks, B. Mario 
Doll, Donna O. 
Donnellan, Quentin A. 



Donovan, Edwin S. 
Dorf , Charlotte M. 
Douglas, Jean 
Douglass, G. Loren 
Drake, Elizabeth A. 
Drayer, Barbara A. 
Drayer, Donald W. 



Dronbergr, Dale 
Dubbs, Florence M. 
Dudley, Earll D. 
Dunbar, Miriam 
Dungan, Marvin E. 
Duphorne, June 
Durst, Harold E. 



Duwe, Mildred A. 
Dykeman, Joan 
Earl, John H. 
Easton, William J., Jr. 
Eaton, Francis M. 
Edwards, Charles S. 
Edwards, Ray N., Jr. 

309 








Known for high ideals and outstanding scholarship, 
LORETA STRICKLIN . . . Omicron Uu . . . Kappa 
Beta . . . UNESCO . . . Prix . . . Danforth Fresh- 
man Award . . . Who's Who . . . S.P.C. . . . Clovia. 



EGAN, JOANNE M. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Clothing and Retailing 
Chi Omega; Newman Club; Home Ec Club; 
Intramurals. 

EGGERMAN, DOROTHY . . Green 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 
Kappa Delta; Purple Pepsters; Nursing Club; 
Home Ec Club; YWCA. 

EHRSAM, ALGER R Bern 

Agriculture 

EKART, WILLIAM R Alma 

Business Administration 

ELBL, WILLIAM M Sterling 

Chemical Engineering 

ELLIS, DAN K Cambridge 

Industrial Arts 

ELLIS, ROSCOE, JR. . . . Havensville 

Agronomy 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog. 



ELMER, HAROLD S. . . . Manhattan 

Biological Science 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

ENGEL, ALBERT E. . . Independence 

Business Administration 

ENGELLAND, RUTH A. . . Sterling 

Option B 
Alpha Tau Omega. 

ENGELLAND, RUTH AL. . . Sterling 

Home Economics and Education 
Hospitality Days' Steering Comm.; Van Zile, 
Vice-Pres. 4; YWCA. 

ENGLER, ROBERT G . . . Chapman 

Business Administration 

EPP, VIRGINIA L Salina 

Medical Technology 
Chi Omega, Vice-Pres. 4; Phi Alpha Mu, 
Sec-Treas. 4; Alpha Delta Theta, Sec. 3; 
Corres. Sec. 4; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog. 

EPPINGER, LEROY G. . . . Norton 

Business Administration 



EVANS, PHYLLIS R Stanley 

Industrial Chemistry 
Chi Omega, Vice-Pres. 3, Treas. 2; Phi Alpha 
Mu, Pres 4; Mortar Board; Prix; A.Ch.S.; 
State Collegiate Republ., Vice-Pres. 3; Young 
Collegiate Republ. Party, Vice-Pres. 3; Sec. 
All-College Party, 3; Student Council, Sec. 4; 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Rep. at Natl. 
Student Assn. 4; S.P.C; I.S.A.; YWCA. 



EWALD, PHILIP H. . Kansas City, Mo 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Intramurals. 

FALEN, HOBART N. . . . Manhattan 

Agriculture 
Horticulture Club, Pres. 4; Ag Ec Club. 

FALEN, TEDDY S. ... Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

FEDELL, RICHARD L. . . Frontenac 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; Student Council. 

FENTON, FRANKLIN H. . Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering 
Beta Theta Pi; Steel Ring; A.I.Ch.E., Sec. 4. 

FETROW, JOHN W Attica 

Electrical Engineering 



FICHTNER, HENRY J., JR. . Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E. 

FIESER, LORINE Norwich 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Kappa Phi; Wesley Foundation; Collegiate 
4-H. 

FINEGAN, RICHARD J. . . Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta, Vice-Pres. 3; Steel Ring, 
Treas. 3; A.I.E.E., Treas. 3; Engineering 
Council, Treas. 4; Kansas State Engr., Assoc. 
Ed. 4, Assoc. Feature Ed. 3; S.P.C. 

FISHER, MARY EDITH . . Fredonia 

Home Economics and Education 
Kappa Phi; Wesley Foundation; Collegiate 
4-H, Sec. 3; Miniwanca Club, Vice-Pres. 2, 
Pres. 3; Home Ec Publicity Club; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 

FLENTIE, DONALD L. . . . Centralia 

Agriculture 

FORD, DON H Marysville 

Physical Science 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Student Council, Pres 4; 
Psychology Club, Sec-Treas. 4. 

FORD, WILBUR D. . . Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering and Business Administration 



FOREMAN, CHARLES F. . Manhattan 
Dairy Husbandry 
S.P.C; Collegiate 4-H; Veterans' Assn.; Dairy 
Club. 

FOSTER, CHARLES C . . Effingham 

Soil Conservation 

FOWLER, GEORGANNE . Dodge City 

Industrial Chemistry 
Mortar Board, Treas 4; Amicossembly, Pres. 
3; Keim's Kabana, Pres. 2; I.S.A.; S.P.C; 
Collegiate 4-H; UNESCO; La Verne Noyes 
Scholarship; Intramurals; YWCA. 

FRALICK, NAOMI R Howard 

Clotihng and Retailing 
Band; Glee Club; A Cappella; Home Ec 
Publicity Club; K-State Players; Purple Pep- 
sters, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres 4: YWCA. 

FRANCIS, NORENE .... Simpson 

Music Education 
Mu Phi Epsilon, Pres. 3, 4; Collegiate 4-H; 
Promusica; Band 1, 2; A Cappella; Glee 
Club; YWCA. 

FRANCIS, RAYMOND E. . . Arcadia 

Business Administration 



FRANKLIN, LYLA M. . . . 

Home Economics 
Collegiate 4-H; Kappa Phi; YWCA. 



Atwood 



FRANTZ, KENNETH E. . . Lindsborg 
Soil Conservation 



FREDRICKSON, PAULINE . Concordia 

Medical Technology 
Pi Beta Phi; Alpha Delta Theta, Vice- Pres. 
4; Theta Epsilon, Treas. 2, 4, Vice.Pres. 3; 
YWCA. 

FREDRICKSON, RALPH K. . Oberlin 

Mechanical Engineering 
Alpha Tau Omega. 

FREEDLUN, JOHN P. . . . Chanute 

Animal Husbanry 

FREEMAN, E. ROY . . . Manhattan 

Physical Science 

FRIZZELL, CONSTANCE E. 

Rochester, New York 

Medical Technology 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Alpha Delta Theta; 
Frog Club; Orchesis; YWCA. 

FUHRKEN, RALPH C. . Washington 

Music Education 
Alpha Tau Omega. 



FULLER, RICHARD M. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Civil Engineering 
Beta Theta Pi; A.S.C.E.; K-Fraternity; Letter- 
man in Track. 

FULTON, ERNEST L. . . Nortonville 

Civil Engineering 

FULTZ, KENNETH E. . . Nortonville 

Electrical Engineering 
Tau Beta Pi; Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu; 
I.R.E. 

FUNSTON, JULES . . . Independence 

Business Administration 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

GAAFAR, EL-SAYED MOHAMMED 
HEGAB Cairo, Egypt 

Zoology and Parasitology, Graduate 

GAFFORD, LLOYD C Willis 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E. 

GAGE, WALTER R., JR. . Manhattan 

Option B 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Alpha Phi Omega, 
Vice-Pres. 1, 2, 3, 4; Masonic Club; Intra- 
murals; YMCA. 



GANDEE, IRVINE E. . . Junction City 

Electrical Engineering and Business Administration 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Sigma Tau, Sec. 4; 
Eta Kappa Nu; Steel Ring; Pi Mu Epsilon; 
Sr. Class Pres.; Student Council; Fresh. 
Recog.; Intramurals. 

GARRISON, DELLA M. . . Manhattan 

Home Economics and Education 

GARRISON, EVELYN R. . . Abbyville 

Home Economics 
Home Ec Club. 

GARRISON, MARGARET . Hutchinson 
Home Economics 
Collegiate 4^H; YWCA, Pres 4. 

GARTON, CHESTER D. . . . Norton 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Wampus Cats. 

GATES, DELL E Agra 

Agriculture 
Block and Bridle Club, Treas. 3; Intramurals; 
Popenoe Entomological Club, Treas. 4; 
YMCA. 

GATES, KATHRYN M Agra 

Home Economics and Education 
Home Ec Club; Fresh. Counselor; YWCA. 



Egan, Joanne M. 
Eggerman, Dorothy 
Ehrsam, Alger R. 
Ekart, William R., Jr. 
Elbl, William M. 
Ellis, Dan K. 
Ellis, Roscoe, Jr. 



Elmer, Harold S. 
Engel, Albert E. 
Engelland, Charles W. 
Engelland, Ruth A. 
Engler, Robert G. 
Epp, Virginia L. 
Eppinger, Leroy G. 



Evans, Phyllis R. 
Ewald, Philip H. 
Falen, Hobart N. 
Falen, Teddy S. 
Fedell, Richard L. 
Fenton, Franklin H. 
Fetrow, John W. 



Fichtner, Henry J., Jr. 
Fieser, Lorine N. 
Finegan, Richard J. 
Fisher, Mary Edith 
Flentie, Donald L. 
Ford, Don H. 
Ford, Wilbur D. 



Foreman, Charles F. 
Foster, Charles C. 
Fowler, Georganne 
Fralick, Naomi R. 
Francis, Norene 
Francis, Raymond E. 
Franklin, Lyla M. 



Frantz, Kenneth E. 
Fredrickson, Pauline 
Fredrickson, Ralph K. 
Freedlun, John P. 
Freeman, E. Roy 
Frizzell, Constance E. 
Fuhrken, Ralph C. 



Fuller, Richard M. 
Fulton, Ernest L. 
Fultz, Kenneth E. 
Funston, Jules 
Gaafar, El-Sayed 
Gafford, Lloyd C. 
Gage, Walter R., Jr. 



Gandee, Irvine E. 
Garrison, Delia M. 
Garrison, Evelyn R. 
Garrison, Margaret 
Garton, Chester D. 
Gates, Dell E. 
Gates, Kathryn M. 

311 




f% ^% ^\ 

\ M MM 





> 










Big wheel among engineers, RICHARD "DICK" 
FEDELL . . . Student Council . . . S.P.C. . . . Sigma 
Tau ... Pi Tau Sigma. 



GATZ, KATHARINE E. . . . Preston 

Option B 
Kappa Delta; I.S.A.; S.P.C; History and 
Government Club; YWCA. 

GEE, MARY V Chanute 

Home Economics 
Waltheim Hall, Pres. 3; Eastern Star; Wes- 
ley Foundation; Home Ec Radio Club; 
YWCA. 

GEHRKE, IRENE E. . . . Herington 

Home Service 
Amistad; Collegiate 4-H; Theta Epsilon, his- 
torian 1; Lutheran Students Assn.; Religious 
Feder.; UNESCO, Sec. 4; Rodeo Queen 3; 
YWCA. 

GEORG, JOAN LaCrosse 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Lutheran Students Assn., Sec. 4; Home Ec 
Club; YWCA. 

GEORGE, DONALD W. . . . Topeka 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. 
Recog.; Sears Club; Soph. Honors. 

GEORGE, DOUGLAS .... Lebo 

Agriculture 
Alpha Gamma Rho, Treas.; Block and Bridle 
Club, Treas. 2, 3, 4,; Collegiate 4-H; Little 
American Royal, Mgr. 4; Livestock and Meat 
Judging Teams. 

GIFFORD, DOROTHY J. . El Dorado 

Biological Science 
Alpha Delta Pi; Alpha Delta Theta; Phi 
Alpha Mu; YWCA. 



GILES, ALMA H Wichita 

Foods and Nutrition, Graduate 

GILKISON, G. LUCILE . . Hutchinson 

Home Economics 

GILLILAND, OTIS Girard 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E., Corres. Sec. 4. 

GILMORE, EDNA .... El Dorado 

Foods and Food Research 
Alpha Xi Delta, Treas. 2; Omicron Nu; 
Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; 
Collegiate 4-H; UNESCO; YWCA. 

GIOVAGNOLI, PAUL S. . . . Girard 

Mechanical Engineering 

GISH, BETTY M Manhattan 

Option B 
Delta Delta Delta; YWCA. 

GISHWILLER, EUGENE . . Almena 

Business Administration 
Phi Kappa Phi; Band; A Cappella; Men's 
Glee Club; Tumbling 2. 



GLAVINICH, JOSEPH . . Kansas City 

Business Administration 
Varsity Football 1, 2. 

GLOTZBACH, BETTY M. . . Eureka 

Business Administration 
Business Club; Newman Club. 

GLOTZBACH, RALPH B. . . Paxico 

Business Administration 
Phi Kappa; Business Club, Pres.; Newman 
Club; Collegiate 4-H; Veterans' Assn. 

GLOVER, WILLIAM C. . . Manhattan 

Milling Industry 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

GODFREY, BEVERLY I. Arkansas City 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta; YWCA. 

GODFREY, DOROTHY . Leavenworth 

Speech, Graduate 

GODFREY, GEORGE W. . . . Liberal 

Mechanical Engineering 
Delta Sigma Phi; K-State Engr. Staff. 



GORGAS, ETHEL M. . . Hutchinson 
Home Economics 
Hospitality Days' Comm. 

GOSS, CHARLES G. . . . Osage City 

Mechanical Engineering 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E 

GOSS, JO ANN H Burns 

Child Welfare 
Alpha Xi Delta; Kappa Phi. 

GRABER, ORLAND . . Pretty Prairie 

Mechanical Engineering 

GRABER, RUTH Turon 

Business Administration 

GRAHAM, ROY S Altamont 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Pres. 3; Pi Tau Sigma; 
A.S.M.E. 
GRANDFIELD, VIRGINIA M. . Wichita 

Home Economics 
Clovia, Pres. 3; Prix; Mortar Board, Sec. 4; 
Sigma Eta Chi, Pres. 3; Collegiate 4-H, 
Corres. Sec. 1; Religious Feder.; Home Ec 
Club; Home Ec Fresh. Counselor; Who's 
Whoot, Editor 4; Ass't. Editor 3; Who's 
Who; Danforth Scholarship; YWCA, Sec. 
3, Treas. 4. 



GREEN, JOHN W. . . . Mound City 

Electrical Engineering and Business Administration 

I.R.E.; A.I.E.E.; K-State Engr., Bus. Mgr.; 

Rifle Team; Athenian Lit. Society; Flying 

Wildcats. 
GREEN, WILLIAM D. . . Manhattan 
Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Newman Club; Intra- 

murals. 
GREENOUGH, JEAN M. . . Solomon 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 

Delta Delta Delta; Home Ec Club; Kappa 

Phi; Leadership Council, Pres. 3; YWCA. 

GROGG, BENJAMIN . St. Joseph, Mo. 

Milling Chemistry 
Alpha Mu, Sec. -Treas.; Phi Lambda Upsilon; 
Milling Assn. 

GROSDIDIER, ROSEMARY . . Eudora 

Home Economics 
Alpha Chi Omega; Home Ec Club; Newman 
Club; Hospitality Days' Comm. 
GROTE, LLOYD D Sabetha 

Electrical Engineering 

Wesley Foundation; Orchestra; Cosmopolitan 

Club, Pres.; A.I.E.E.; Masonic Club; YMCA. 

GROVE, GWEN Larned 

Option A 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



GUIPRE, ROBERT W. . San Benita, Tex. 

Electrical Engineering 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; I.R.E. 



GULLEY, CAROL H. ... El Dorado 

Florticulture and Ornamental Horticulture 
Horticulture Club, Sec. 3, Treas. 4; Wesley 
Foundation; Kappa Phi; Ag Queen Atten- 
dant. 

GULLEY, RAYMOND A. . . Lawrence 

Florticulture and Ornamental Horticulture 
Horticulture Club, Vice-Pres.; Ag Council; 
Wesley Foundation. 

GULLEY, WILLIAM R. . . . Olathe 

Florticulture and Ornamental Horticulture 
Horticulture Club. 

GUNTER, LYLE W. . . . White City 

Electrical Engineering 

GWIN, FRANCIS B Leoti 

Economics, Graduate 

GWIN, PAUL H Manhattan 

Agriculture 
Alpha Tau Omega. 



GWIN, ROY E Leoti 

Agronomy, Graduate 

HACKNEY, JANEY . . . Wellington 

Industrial Journalism 
K-State Players, Pres. 4; Nat'l. Collegiate 
Players, Sec. 4; Radio Guild; Kappa Phi; 
Wesley Foundation; Senior Class Sec; Col- 
legian Society Ed.; Publ Award. 

HADLEY, JAMES F. . . Independence 

Electrical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu, Sec. 4; I.R.E.; 
Alpha Phi Omega; Pi Mu Epsilon, Vice-Pres. 
3; Phi Kappa Phi. 

HAGUE, DARILENE D. . . Hugoton 

Home Economics and Art 
Amicossembly, Sec; Skywood Hall, Pres.; 
Band, Majorette. 

HALBOWER, CHARLES . . Anthony 

Psychology, Graduate 

HALL, MILDRED I. . . . Coffeyville 

Clothing and Retailing 
Chi Omega, Treas. 2, Pres. 4; Collegiate 4-H; 
Home Ec, Ex. Council; Hospitality Days' Co- 
Chr. 4; Omicron Nu, Pres. 3, Delegate to 
Conclave 3; Senior Class Treas. 4; Ag Barn- 
warmer Queen 3; Who's Who; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 

HAMLIN, FRANK S. . . Mobile, Ala. 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; Sigma Tau; Pi Mu Epsilon; 
A.S.M.E. 



HAMLIN, HOWARD E. . . Manhattan 

Physical Education 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; K Fraternity, Pres. 3; Phi 
Epsilon Kappa, Vice-Pres. 4; Varsity Football 
Letters; Fresh. Football. 

HAMMERLI, DONALD R. Clay Center 
Option A 
Sophomore Honors; YMCA. 

HAMMOND, CLARICE . . Great Bend 

Home Economics and Art 
Westminister Foundation, Treas. 3; Ameri- 
can Artist Award, 2, 3. 

HAMMOND, EDNA A. . . . Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing 
Delta Delta Delta; K-State Players; Home Ec 
Club; Promusica. 

HANLY, JEANNE .... Manhattan 
Option A 
Chi Omega. 

HANSEN, ENAS M Wichita 

Home Economics 
Clovia; Collegiate 4-H; Home Ec Club; 
Gamma Delta, Treas. 3, Sec. 2; Fresh. 
Counselor; YWCA. 

HANSON, RICHARD H. 

Salt Lake, Utah 
Architecture 
Phi Delta Theta. 






Gatz, Katharine E. 
Gee, Mary V. 
Gehrke, Irene E. 
Georg, Joan 
George, Donald W. 
George, Douglas 
Gifford, Dorothy J. 



Giles, Alma H. 
Gilkison, G. Lucile 
Gilliland, Otis 
Gilmore, Edna M. 
Giovagnoli, Paul S. 
Gish, Betty M. 
Gishwiller, Eugene 



Glavinich, Joseph 
Glotzbach, Betty M. 
Glotzbach, Ralph B. 
Glover, William C. 
Godfrey, Beverly I. 
Godfrey, Dorothy 
Godfrey, George W. 



Gorgas, Ethel M. 
Goss, Charles G. 
Goss, Jo Ann H. 
Graber, Orland 
Graber, Ruth L. 
Graham, Roy S. 
Grandfield, Virginia M. 



Green, John W. 
Green, William O. 
Greenough, Jean M. 
Grogg, Benjamin 
Grosdidier, Rosemary 
Grote, Lloyd D. 
Grove, Gwen 



Guipre, Robert W. 
Gulley, Carol H. 
Gulley, Raymond A. 
Gulley, William R. 
Gunter, Lyle W. 
Gwin, Francis B. 
Gwin, Paul H. 



Gwin, Roy E. 
Hackney, Janey L. 
Hadley, James F. 
Hague, Darilene D. 
Halbower, Charles C. 
Hall, Mildred I. 
Hamlin, Frank S. 



Hamlin, Howard E. 
Hammerli, Donald R. 
Hammond, Clarice E. 
Hammond, Edna A. 
Hanly, Jeanne 
Hansen, Enas M. 
Hanson, Richard H. 

313 





Editor of Who's Whoot, VIRGINIA M. GRAND- 
FIELD . . . Prix . . . Mortar Board . . . Who's Who 
. . . Clovia . . . Panhellenic Representative . . . 
4-H Reporter. 



HARMAN, WALTER G. . Hoisington 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; A.S.M.E.; Band; Foot- 
ball 2. 

HARMON, JACK D Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Nu; Pi Tau Sigma; Steel Ring; 
A.S.M.E. 

HARON, ALBERT S. . . Baghdad, Iraq 

Mechanical Engineering 
Cosmopolitan Club; A.S.M.E.; Hillel Founda- 
tion. 

HARRISON, JOANN B. . . Manhattan 

Music Education 

HARRISON, ROBERT E. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu. 

HART, WILLIAM C. . . . White City 

Civil Engineering 
Acacia; A.S.C.E.; Intramurals. 

HARVEY, ROY S. . . . Junction City 

Business Administration 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Sec; Interfrat Council, 
Pres. 4; S.P.C. 



HASKETT, WILLIAM C. . . Peru, Ind. 

Agronomy 
Ag Assn.; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Klod 
and Kernel Klub, Treas. 4. 

HAWLEY, VIVIAN H. . . . Abilene 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 
Collegiate 4-H; Amicossembly; A Cappella; 
Home Ec Club; Wesley Foundation; Gradu- 
ates' Wives Club, Pres. 4; YWCA. 

HAYES, BEVERLY J. . . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Pi Beta Phi, Vice-Pres. 4; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Wesley Foundation; I.S.A.; Business Club; 
Intramurals; YWCA. 

HAYS, ROBERT P Cherokee 

Architectural Engineering 

HEATH, CLARENCE G. . . . Leoti 

Physical Education 
Alpha Tau Omega; K Fraternity, Pres. 3; 
Student Athletic Council; Varsity Football 
1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Mo. -Kan. Sr. All-Star 
Team 1947; Varstiy Baseball 2. 

HECHT, ROGER L. . . . Kensington 

Agricultural Journalism 
Plow and Pen; Collegiate 4-H; House of 
Williams, Pres. 4. 



HEDGECOCK, JACKSON L. . Pittsburg 

Mechanical Engineering 
Phi Kappa Phi; Pi Tau Sigma; Pi Mu Epsi- 
lon; A.S.M.E.; Amistad; Engineers' Open 
House, M. E. Chm. 4. 



HEGGY, BETTY LOU . . Garden City 

Home Economics and Art 
Band; Orchestra; Amicossembly; Home Ec 
Service Club; I.S.A.; Baptist Youth Fellow- 
ship; Skywood Hall, Pres. 3. 
HEGGY, COMPTON E. . . . Stafford 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E.; Baptist Youth Fellowship. 
HELFREY, JEAN M. . . . Hutchinson 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
HEMPHILL, JOHN M. . . Greensburg 

Mechanical Engineering 

HEMPHILL, RUSSELL P. . Greensburg 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E. 
HENDRICKSON, RUBY R. . Concordia 

Home Economics and Nursing 
HENNON, HELEN . . . Washington 

Industrial Journalism 



HENRICKS, DENNIS E. . . Emporia 

Business Administration 
HERRICK, CAROL W. . . . Elmdale 
Home Economics and Education 
Clovia; Home Ec Club; Collegiate 4-H; 
YWCA. 
HERRICK, CHARLES W. . . Elmdale 
Agriculture 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Tri-K; Col- 
legiate 4-H; Track. 
HETER, CAROL JEAN . . . Sterling 
Home Economics 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Collegiate 4-H Club, 
Pres. 3; Miniwanca Club, Sec. 2; Leadership 
Council, Vice-Pres. 2; Band; K-State Players, 
Sec. 3; Home Ec Club, Vice-Pres. 4; Fresh. 
Counselor 3; Hospitality Days, Steering Com- 
mittee; Prix; Org Control Board, Sec. 3; 
Mortar Board; Omicron Nu, Vice-Pres. 4; 
International Court of Justice Judge, 3; 
Phi Kappa Phi 4; Who's Who 4; Outstand- 
ing Senior; Intramurals; YWCA. 

HEWSON, MARY E Larned 

Option B 
HIDAYATULLAH, KHAN S. 

East Khandesh, India 
Agriculture Economics, Graduate 
HILL, HAROLD W. . . . Kansas City 
Architectural Engineering 

HILL, JARVIS L Topeka 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 
HILLERMAN, JOHN P. . Turlock, Calif. 
Poultry Husbandry 
Poultry Science Club, Pres.; Softball. 

HINES, HAROLD E Salina 

Milling Administration 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

HINMAN, CLYDE D. . . McCracken 

Chemical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Phi Lambda Upsilon, Sec. 4; Pi 

Mu Epsilon; A.I.Ch. E. 

HISER, ARTHUR B. . . . Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; A.I.Ch. E.; Bridge Tournament. 

HOCHULI, WAYNE D . . . Holton 

Mechanical Engineering 
HODGSON, JOSEPH H. . Little River 
Agricultural Engineering 
Theta Xi. 

HOEFER, JOHN J. . . Los Angeles, Cal. 

Electrical Engineering and 

Business Administration 

I.R.E.; Eta Kappa Nu, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; 

Sigma Tau; K-State Engineer Staff; S.P.C. 



HOFFMAN, ALLEN, JR. . Coffeyville 

Chemical Engineering 
A.I.Ch. E. 

HOLLECKER, JEANNE . Kansas City 
Option A 
Newman Club; Intramurals. 

HOLMGREN, JEAN A. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Option A 
Pi Beta Phi; Theta Epsilon; Club Cervantes; 
Leadership Council; Publ. Award; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

HOLT, CARL D. . . . Guyman, Okla. 

Mechanical Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta; A.S.M.E.; Glee Club; Glider 
Club; Intramurals. 

HOMMON, RAYMOND C. 

Smith Center 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E., Treas; Veterans' Assn. 

HONSTEAD, JOHN F. . . . Topeka 

Chemical Engineering 
Alpha Phi Omega. 



HONSTEAD, MARJORIE L. . Topeka 

Home Economics 
Home Ec Nursing Club. 

HOOVER, VERNON R. . . Winfield 

Physical Science 
Beta Theta Pi; Williston Geology Club; 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Dance Manager. 

HOPE, MARY I Hutchinson 

Home Service 
Wesminister Foundation; YWCA. 

HOPKINS, DEWI A Topeka 

Architectural Engineering 
A. I. A.; Intramurals. 

HORTON, WILLIAM M. . . Wichita 

Business Administration 
Mens' Glee Club; A.I.E.E.; Business Club; 
Veterans' Assn.; Athenian Lit. Society. 

HOWARD, CLAUDE M. . Kansas City 
Option B 
Phi Delta Theta; Inter. Frat. Council, Pres. 
4; Intramurals. 

HOWARD, DENTON I. . . Gaylord 

Business Administration 
Phi Delta Theta; Business Club; Intramurals. 



HOWARD, VIRGINIA . . . Clayton 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Omicron Nu; Home Ec Club. 

HOWELL, WILBUR A. . . . Wallace 

Agricultural Administration 
Block and Bridle, Corres. Sec. 3; Chaparajos, 
Treas. 3; Ag Ec Club, Treas. 4. 

HOWEY, HAROLD H. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Physical Education 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Basketball 3, 4. 

HUDDLESTON, ANN J. 

Kansas City, Mo 

Physical Science 
Pi Beta Phi, Pres. 4; Theta Epsilon, Sec. 3; 
I.S.A.; Prix; Mortar Board; Sophomore Class 
Vice-Pres.; Student Council; Outstanding 
Senior; Publ. Award; Leadership Council, 
Vice-Pres. 2; Intramurals; YWCA. 

HUDDLESTON, WILLA J. . Hoisington 

Home Economics 

HUDELSON, JOHN F. . . . Pomona 
Option B 
Phi Delta Theta; Jr. A.V.M.A.; Scarab; Busi- 
ness Club; S.P.C; YMCA. 

HUDSON, JAMES C. . . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Industrial Arts Club, Pres. 3; Engineering 
Council; Engineers' Open House Comm. 3. 



Harman, Walter G. 
Harmon, Jack D. 
Haron, Albert S. 
Harrison, Joann B. 
Harrison, Robert E. 
Hart, William C. 
Harvey, Roy S. 



Haskett, William C. 
Hawley, Vivian H. 
Hayes, Beverly J. 
Hays, Robert P. 
Heath, Clarence G. 
Hecht, Roger L. 
Hedgecock, Jackson L. 



Heggy, Betty Lou 
Heggy, Compton E. 
Helfrey, Jean M. 
Hemphill, John 
Hemphill, Russell P. 
Hendrickson, Ruby 
Hennon, Helen L. 



Henricks, Dennis E. 
Herrick, Carol W. 
Herrick, Charles W. 
Heter, Carol Jean 
Hewson, Mary E. 
Hidayatullah, Khan S. 
Hill, Harold W. 



Hill, Jarvis L. 
Hillerman, John P. 
Hines, Harold E. 
Hinman, Clyde D. 
Hiser, Arthur B. 
Hochuli, Wayne D. 
Hodgson, Joe H. 



Hoefer, John J. 
Hoffman, Allen, Jr. 
Hollecker, Jeanne 
Holmgren, Jean A. 
Holt, Carl D. 
Hommon, Raymond C. 
Honstead, John F. 



Honstead, Marjorie L. 
Hoover, Vernon R. 
Hope, Mary I. 
Hopkins, Dewi A. 



iiuuun, vv iiiii.iiii a»x. 

Howard, Claude M. 
Howard, Denton I. 


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Howard, Virginia M. 


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Howell, Wilbur A. 


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Howey, Harold H. 


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Huddleston, Ann J. 


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Hudelson, John F. 




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315 





Winner of three publications awards, NANCY DIG- 
GLE . . . Theta Sigma Phi . . . Mortar Board . . . 
Phi Alpha Mu . . . Prix ... Phi Kappa Phi . . . 
Editor Collegian . . . Who's Who. 



HULINGS, MARK H. . . . Atchison 

Mechanical Engineering 

HUME, ROBERT A. . Silver Springs, N. Y. 

Animal Husbandry 

HUMES, RICHARD P. . Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering and Business Administration 

HUND, CHARLES M Paxico 

Agricultural Education 
Phi Kappa; Ag Ed Club; Collegiate 4-H. 

HUNT, NANCY M. . . Overland Park 
Option B 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

HUTTON, BILLY J. . . . Carbondale 

Electrical Engineering 

IMEL, CLARENCE .... Spearville 
Option B and Animal Husbandry 
Block and Bridle; Newman Club; Sophomore 
Honors. 



IMHOF, LEONARD . . . 

Civil Engineering 



Cherokee 



IRISH, BETTY L. . . . Colchester, 111. 

English, Graduate 

IRISH, KENT R. . . . Colchester, 111. 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub; Masonic Club, Sec. 4. 

ISAACSON, WALTER P. . . Hiawatha 

Electrical Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta. 

JACKSON, ANDREW H. . Kansas City 

Organic Chemistry, Graduate 



JACKSON, BETTY R. 

Option A 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



Hill City 



JACKSON, ROBERT W. . . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 
Beta Theta Pi; A.I.A.; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. 
Recog.; Engr. Council, Pres. 3; Board of 
Student Publ. 3; Wampus Cats; Collegian, 
Sports Ed.; lnterfrat Council, Vice-Pres. 2; 
K-State Engr., Editor 3; Intramurals. 



JACOBS, ARTHUR O. . . . Harper 

Agriculture 

JACOBS, CHARLES F. . . . . Potwin 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub. 



JACOBS, IRVEN F Hays 

Business Administration 



JACOBS, ROBERT F. . . . 

Business Administration 



Sedgwick 



JACOBS, WINONA W. . . Manhattan 
Home Economics and Art 

JACOBSON, GLEN A. . . . Marysville 

Industrial Chemistry 

JAMES, STEPHEN K. . . Blue Rapids 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E. 



JANKE, RAYMOND H. . 

Industrial Arts 



Clafli 



in 



JANSSEN, VERNON E. . . . Lorraine 

Agricultural Administration 

JARANILLA, RAMON . Junction City 

Zoology, Graduate 

JEFFRIES, JO ANN .... Pittsburg 

Business Administration 
Alpha Delta Pi; Business Club, Sec. 4; Phi 
Alpha Mu; YWCA. 

JENKINS, GEORGEANNE . Independence 

Physical Science 
Alpha Delta Pi, Sec. 4; Phi Chi Delta; 
YWCA. 

JENNINGS, MARY F. . . Junction City 

Option A 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; lnterfrat Pledge 

Council; Purple Pepsters; Home Ec Club; 

Publ. Award; Intramurals; YWCA. 

JENNISON, LEONARD W. . Rush Center 

Physical Education 

JENSEN, MARVIN A Hunter 

Agronomy 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Collegiate 4-H. 

JILKA, LAURENCE E. . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Phi Kappa. 

JOHNSON, CALVIN E. . . Lindsborg 

Chemical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A.I.Ch.E. 

JOHNSON, E. CARL . Cottonwood Falls 

Architectural Engineering 
A. I. A.; Masonic Club. 

JOHNSON, GEORGIA J. . Council Grove 
Home Economics and Art 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

JOHNSON, LEONARD D. . . Norton 

Business Administration 
Veterans' Assn.; Business Club. 

JOHNSON, LEWIS T. . . Algona, Iowa 

Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Delta Chi; Radio Guild; Publ. Award. 



JOHNSON, MAURINE . . . Sterling 
Home Economics 

JOHNSON, PAUL A. . . . Concordia 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E., Treas. 1; Sigma Tau. 

JOHNSON, RAYMOND D. . Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 



JOHNSON, WENDELL B. . 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Sec; Band. 



. Falun 



JOHNSON, WILLIE M. . Little Rock, Ark. 

Clothing and Textiles, Graduate 

JOHNSTON, FREDERICK V. . Salina 

Architectural Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa Phi; A. I. A. Pres.; 
Engineering Council; Sigma Tau Silver Medal 
Award; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog. 

JONES, ELMER D Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering 
A.I.Ch.E.; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Canterbury Club, Treas. 3. 

JONES, EMMA J Wakeeney 

Home Economics and Art 

Kappa Delta; Home Ec Club; Purple Pep- 
sters; I.S.A.; lnterfrat. Pledge Council; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 
JONES, GEORGE R Simpson 

Physical Science 

Alpha Tau Omega; Geology Club; Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon. 

JONES, G. TED .... Dallas, Tex. 

Architectural Engineering 

JONES, JOHN W., JR Lebo 

Electrical Engineering 

JONES, NORMA L. . . . Manhattan 
Option A 
Chi Omega; Radio Guild; Leadership Coun- 
cil; Publ. Award; K-State Players; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

JORGENSON, PAUL H. . . Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; A.S.C.E., Sec. 4; Steel 
Ring; Wampus Cats, Sec. 2; lnterfrat. Coun- 
cil; lnterfrat. Pledge Council; Intramurals; 
YMCA. 

KAYS, FREDERICK A., JR. . Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering 
Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Pi Mu 
Epsilon; Phi Kappa Phi Fres. Recog. 

KEESLING, MAXINE L. . . . Burrton 

Business Administration 
Alpha Chi Omega, Vice-Pres. 3, 4; Beta Phi 
Gamma, Sec. 2; Purple Pepsters; Collegiate 
4-H; K-State Players; Publ. Award; Pan- 
hellenic Council; YWCA. 



KEHMEIER, KEITH R. . . 

Busines Administration. 
Alpha Tau Omega. 



St. Francis 



KEITH, ALLIS A Manhattan 

Bacteriology, Graduae 



KELLER, WARD A. 



Manhattan 



Mechanical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta; Pi Tau Sigma; Sigma Tau; 
A.S.M.E.; lnterfrat. Pledge Council; K-State 
Engr. Staff; Student Council, Treas. 4; Who's 
Who; Engineers' Open House Comm.; Sum- 
mer School Rec. Comm.; Outstanding Senior; 
Intramurals; YMCA. 

KELLOGG, BARBARA B. . . Stanley 

Industrial Journalism 
Pi Beta Phi; Radio Guild, Treas. 4; Publ. 
Award; Intramurals; YWCA. 

KEPLEY, JANEE Earleton 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta. 

KETTERMAN, WILLIAM R. . Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Steel Ring; 
A.I.Ch.E.; Intramurals. 



Hulings, Mark H. 
Hume, Robert A. 
Humes, Richard P. 
Hund, Charles M. 
Hunt, Nancy M. 
Hutton, Billy J. 
Imel, Clarence 



Imhof, Leonard J. 
Irish, Betty L. 
Irish, Kent R. 
Isaacson, Walter P. 
Jackson, Andrew H. 
Jackson, Betty R. 
Jackson, Robert W. 



Jacobs, Arthur O. 
Jacobs, Charles F. 
Jacobs, Irven F. 
Jacobs, Robert F. 
Jacobs, Winona W. 
Jacobson, Glen A. 
James, Stephen K. 



Janke, Raymond H. 
Janssen, Vernon E. 
Jaranilla, Ramon 
Jeffries, Jo Ann 
Jenkins, Georgeanne 
Jennings, Mary Frances 
Jennison, Leonard W. 



Jensen, Marvin A. 
Jilka, Laurence E. 
Johnson, Calvin E. 
Johnson, E. Carl 
Johnson, Georgia J. 
Johnson, Leonard D. 
Johnson, Lewis T. 



Johnson, Maurine 
Johnson, Paul A. 
Johnson, Raymond D. 
Johnson, Wendell B. 
Johnson, Willie M. 
Johnston, Frederick V. 
Jones, Elmer D. 



Jones, Emma J. 
Jones, George R. 
Jones, G. Ted 
Jones, John W., Jr. 
Jones, Norma L. 
Jorgenson, Paul H. 
Kays, Frederick A., Jr. 



Keesling, Maxine L. 
Kehmeier, Keith R. 
Keith, Allis A. 
Keller, Ward A. 
Kellogg, Barbara B. 
Kepley, Jane E. 
Ketterman, William R. 

317 




o e\ o 





Genial leader both in and out of class, LEONARD 
EUGENE WOOD . . . Who's Who . . . Junior Class 
Officer . . . Wampus Cats . . . Blue Key . . . Steel 
Ring ... Phi Lambda Upsilon . . . Acacia . . . 
Sigma Tau. 



KRAMER, FRED C Salina 

Milling Administration 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

KRAMER, FREDERICK L. . . Topeka 

Civil Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta; A Cappella; A.S.C.E.; 
S.P.C. 

KRAUSE, GEORGE .... Harper 

Agronomy 
Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Klod and Kernel 
Klub, Treas. 2, Pres. 4; Agricultural Coun- 
cil, Sec. 4; Collegiate 4-H; Cadet Officers 
Club. 

LAMBERT, CHARLOTTE A. . Hiawatha 

Industrial Journalism 
Collegian Staff; Royal Purple Staff; Publ. 
Award; Wesley Foundation; YWCA. 

LAMBERT, JAMES B. . . Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering 
Engineers' Open House; Intramurals. 

LAMOREAUX, REBECCA . Waterville 
Option A 
Alpha Delta Pi. 



LESLIE, DAVID L Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E., Sec. 3, 4. 



LEVEDAHL, EDITH C. . . Aurora, 111. 

Home Economics and journalism 
Alpha Chi Omega; Theta Sigma Phi; Quill 
Club, Pres.; Omicron Nu. 

LEWIS, DAVID A Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Alpha Tau Omega; Business Club. 

LEWIS, JOHN R. . . Mansfield, Penn. 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.N.E.; Pi Tau Sigma; Rifle Team. 

LEWIS, KATHERINE C. 

North Kansas City, Mo. 
Option B 
Psychology Club; Canterbury Club. 

LHUILLIER, CLAYTON L. . Oswatomie 

Business Administration 

LILLIEQUIST, PEARL A. . Medicine Lodge 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Collegiate 4-H; Home Ec Club; YWCA. 



KILKENNY, JAMES L. . . Manhattan 

Business Administartion 
Beta Theta Pi; Newman Club; Vice-Pres. 3; 
Business Club; A.I.Ch.E.; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog.; Intramurals. 

KILMER, MILTON D. . . Kensington 

Business Administration 
Amistad, Sec. -Treas. 2; Business Club; Band. 

KING, LAWRENCE J. . . Minneapolis 

Physical Education 
Alpha Tau Omega; K-Fraternity; Scabbard 
and Blade; Varsity Football, 2, 3, 4. 

KIPP, WILLIAM M. . . . Manhattan 

Industrial Chemistry 

KIRKENDALL, VERN S. . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Amistad; Business Club; Collegiate 4-H. 

KIRKPATRICK, HUGH R. . Manhattan 
Chemical Engineering 

KISER, HAROLD M Delphos 

Physical Education 
Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Epsilon Kappa; K- 
Fraternity; Track 2, 3, 4,. 



KITE, DULCIE D St. Francis 

Medical Technology 

KLEIN, MARCELINE A. . Hutchinson 

Clothing and Retailing 
Kappa Delta; Intramurals; YWCA. 

KNEDLIK, NORTON K. . . . Riley 

Business Administration 

KNOPF, DONALD W. . . . Emporia 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; 
A.S.M.E. 

KOBROCK, ROBERT C . Kansas City, Mo. 

Physical Science 
Alpha Phi Omega; Cheerleader 2; YMCA. 

KOCH, ALFRED J. . . Sharon Springs 

Agronomy 

Newman Club; Klod and Kernel Klub; 

Alpha Zeta; Collegiate 4-H; Phi Kappa Phi 

Fres. Recog. 

KOLSTE, LOREN C Almena 

Physical Science 
Delta Sigma Phi. 



KONGS, CLARENCE H. . . 

Business Administration 
Phi Kappa. 



Seneca 



LANCASTER, MARGARET E. 

Yates Center 

Biological Science 
Alpha Delta Theta, Sec. 4; I.S.A.; UNESCO; 
Kappa Beta; Amicossembly; Home Ec Club; 
Pal O'Mie, Pres. 2, Treas. 4; Religious Fed.; 
YWCA. 

LANE, CHARLES W. . Muskogee, Okla. 

Physical Science 
Kappa Sigma; Williston Geology Club. 

LARSEN, DONALD W. . . . Peabody 

Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Block and Bridle; Vice-Pres. 3; 
Ag Assn.; Ag Ed Club, Treas. 3; Collegiate 
4-H; S.P.C. 

LARSON, MARILYN . . . Wamego 

Home Economics and Art 
Delta Delta Delta; Home Ec Club; Hospi- 
tality Days' Comm. 

LATSCHAR, ARNOLD M. . Manhattan 
Milling Chemistry 
Alpha Mu. 

LAUGHLIN, JEANNE . . Kansas City 
Option A 
Delta Delta Delta; Newman Club. 

LAW, SUZANNE Lyons 

Medical Technology 
Pi Beta Phi; Phi Chi Delta; Alpha Delta 
Theta; YWCA. 



LEA1RD, DICK D Kensington 

Civil Engineering 

LEASURE, GEORGE A., JR. . Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E.; Sophomore Honors; Track Team 
3; Cross Country Team 4. 

LEATHERS, JAMES W. . . El Dorado 

Agriculture Administration 
Collegiate 4-H; Ag Club, Vice-Pres. 

LEATHERS, THOMAS D. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Delta Chi; Wesley Foundation; Col- 
legian Staff, Copy Desk Editor 4; Varsity 
Baseball 4; Intramurals; YMCA. 

LEHMAN, DORIS .... Enterprise 
Option B 
Collegiate 4-H; Kappa Phi; Wesley Founda- 
tion; YWCA. 

LEPORI-B, ANGELINA 

Panama City, Panama 
Home Economics 
Cosmopolitan Club, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4; 
Club Cervantes; YWCA. 



LIND, BENJAMIN .... Scott City 

Business Administration 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

LINDHOLM, ERNEST A. . . Cheney 

Civil Engineering 

LINGELBACH, DANIEL D. 

Fayetteville, Ark. 
Electrical Engineering, Graduate 

LITTLEFIELD, WINSTON F. 

Hutchinson 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E. Treas. 4. 

LIVERS, RONALD W. . . Waterville 

Agronomy 
Klod and Kernel Klub, Sec. 4; Tri-K Crops 
Contest; Intercollegiate Crops Judging Team. 

LOE, C. DOYLE Glasgo 

Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

LOGAN, DONALD G . Cedar Rapids, la. 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 

LONGFELLOW, DELBERT D. . Climax 

Mechanical Engineering 



LOOMIS, RUTHANN . . Valley Falls 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Purple Pepsters; Kappa Phi; Collegiate 4-H; 
A Cappella. 

LORSOM, ROBERT J. . . . Chapman 

Mechanical Engineering and 
Business Administration 
Phi Kappa, Treas. 2, Pres. 3, 4; Scabbard 
and Blade, Sec. 4; Wampus Cats, Sec.-Treas., 
3; Newman Club; A.S.M.E.; Mortar and Ball; 
Business Club; Pax; K-State Engr. Staff; 
Intramurals. 

LOW, GALEN R Wichita 

Architectural Engineering 

LOY, BEVERLY J Chapman 

Home Economics and Education 
Home Ec Club; Collegiate 4-H; Sears Roe- 
buck Scholarship; S.P.C; YWCA. 

LOYD, JAMES J. . . . Valley Center 
Option B 
Delta Tau Delta. 

LUBROTH, MILDRED . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Art, Graduate 
LUEHRING, LEONARD I. . Washington 

Chemical Engineering 
Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Tau, Treas. 3; Phi 
Lambda Upsilon, Treas. 4; Steel Ring; A.I. 
C.E., Vice-Pres. 4; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. 
Recog. 






Kilkenny, James L. 
Kilmer, Milton D. 
King, Lawrence J. 
Kipp, William M., Jr. 
Kirkendall, Vern S. 
Kirkpatrick, Hugh R. 
Kiser, Harold M. 



Kite, Dulcie D. 
Klein, Marceline A. 
Knedlik, Norton K. 
Knopf, Donald W. 
Kobrock, Robert C. 
Koch, Alfred J. 
Kolste, Loren C. 



Kongs, Clarence H. 
Kramer, Fred C. 
Kramer, Frederick L. 
Krause, George 
Lambert, Charlotte A. 
Lambert, James B. 
Lamoreaux, Rebecca A. 



Lancaster, Margaret E. 
Lane, Charles W. 
Larsen, Donald W. 
Larson, Marilyn 
Latschar, Arnold 
Laughlin, Jeanne 
Law, Suzanne 



Leaird, Dick D. 
Leasure, George A., Jr. 
Leathers, James W. 
Leathers, Thomas D. 
Lehman, Doris M. 
Lepori-B, Angelina 
Leslie, David L. 



Levedahl, Edith C. 
Lewis, David A. 
Lewis, John R. 
Lewis, Katherine C. 
Lhuillier, Clayton L. 
Lilliequist, Pearl A. 
Lind, Benjamin 



Lindholm, Ernest A. 
Lingelbach, Daniel D. 
Littlefield, Winston F. 
Livers, Ronald W. 
Loe, C. Doyle 
Logan, Donald G. 
Longfellow, Delbert D. 



Loomis, Ruthann 
Lorson, Robert J. 
Low, Galen R. 
Loy, Beverly J. 
Loyd, James J. 
Lubroth, Mildred S. 
Luehring, Leonard T. 

319 



C~* k*-l *"**• ***j 









■iwt? ■•»*-•■' f?—»~ lis^^v '^ e r< 



m i.mi JM 





An officer and a capable organizer in many groups, 
GEORGANNE FOWLER . . . Mortar Board . . . Ami- 
cosemmbly . . . Keim's Kabana . . . S.P.C. . . . 
I.S.A. . . . UNESCO . . . 4-H . . . YWCA LaVerne 
Noyes Scholarship. 



LULL, LINTON C. . . . Smith Center 

Animal Husbandry 
Block and Bridle, Sec. 4; Collegiate 4-H; 
Senior Livestock Judging Team; Co-Ch. of 
Little American Royal Comm. 

LUMPKIN, NORMA G. . Phillipsburg 

Option A 
Alpha Xi Delta; Kappa Phi; Band; Eastern 
Star; YWCA. 

LUNDHOLM, JOE, JR. . . Osage City 

Physics, Graduate 

LUNDQUIST, CLINTON E. . Lindsborg 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub; Lutheran Students 
Assn.; Intramurals. 

LYON, GEORGE T . . Greenville, Pa. 

Business Administration 

McCASKILL, GEORGE A. . Kansas City 

Industrial Chemistry 
Phi Lambda Upsilon; A.Ch.S.; Chess Club; 
Wrestling Team 3. 

McCAULEY, HAROLD H. . . Stockton 

Mechanical Engineering 



McCOMB, CECIL N Ft. Scott 

Electrical Engineering 

McCORMICK, HARRY H. . El Dorado 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E. 

McCRARY, PATRICIA G. . Concordia 

Biological Science 
Pi Beta Phi; Phi Chi Delta, Pres. 3; Phi 
Alpha Mu; Phi Kappa Phi; Prix; K-State 
Players; Alpha Delta Theta, Sec; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 

McCREREY, RUTH .... Hiawatha 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta, Treas. 4; Amicossembly; 
Moore-th'-Merrier Pres. 4. 

McDONALD, JANE .... Syracuse 

Option A 
Alpha Chi Omega; K-State Players; YWCA. 

McDOUGAL, LUROY . . . Atwood 

Soil Conservation 

McFADDEN, ROBERT P. . St. Louis, Mo. 

Milling Administration 
K-State Players; S.P.C. 



McGEORGE, DOROTHY M. 

Industrial Journalism 



Cunningham 



McGOVERN, LOUIS J. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Chemical Engineering 
Phi Kappa Phi; A.I.Ch.E.; Newman Club; 
Btidge Tournament. 

McGUIRE, VIRGINIA L Pratt 

Home Economics and Education 
Collegiate 4-H; Sears Roebuck Scholarship; 
YWCA. 

McHARG, ROBERT E. . . El Dorado 

Chemical Engineering 
A.I.Ch.E. 

McINTYRE, JOHN O. . . . Herington 

Physical Science 

McMANIS, LAWRENCE E. . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 

A Cappella; Religious Federation; Wampus 

Cats, Sec. 3, 4; A. I. A.; Students Architect 

Assn.; YMCA, Vice-Pres. 4. 

McNABNEY, CAROLYN F. . Coffeyville 

Biological Science 
Chi Omega; K-State Players; Phi Chi Delta; 
Publ. Award; Intramurals; YWCA. 



McVEY, PATRICIA P. . . . Hill City 
Home Economics 
Alpha Xi Delta. 

MABIE, RICHARD O. . . Pueblo, Colo. 

Architectural Engineering 

MACKINTOSH, DARLENE . Manhattan 

Biological Science 

MADDEN, BRUCE B. . . . Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Pi Tau Sigma. 

MAHONEY, GEORGE T. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Civil Engineering 
Steel Ring; A.S.C.E., Pres. 4; Engineer Coun- 
cil; Engineers' Open House Chr. for Civil 
Engr. 4. 

MALL, WILLIAM W. . . . Manhattan 
Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Delta Chi; Radio Guild, Pres. 4. 

MARDIKS, DAVID . . . Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering 



MARKEY, WILLIAM R. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Civil Engineering 
Phi Kappa; A.S.C.E.; Newman Club; K-State 
Engr. Staff; Intramurals. 

MARKHAM, PEGGY J. . . . Osborne 

Physical Science 
Kappa Phi; Geology Club; Collegiate 4-H; 
A Cappella. 

MARKLEY, MARY L. . . Wellington 

Psychology, Graduate 

MARLOW, SHELTON W. . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Phi Delta Theta. 

MARSHALL, DORIS J. . . . Topeka 

Home Economics 
Delta Delta Delta; Purple Pepsters; K-State 
Players. 

MARTIN, ANNA M. . . Littleton, Colo. 
Music Education 
Promusica; A Cappella; Radio Guild; Organ- 
ists' Guild. 

MASON, EVERETT R. . . Wakefield 

Electrical Engineering 



MASON, JAMES R., JR. . Denver, Colo. 

Agricultural Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta. 
MASTIN, M. ARLENE .... Beloit 

Home Economics and Education 

Alpha Xi Delta, Pres. 4; Orchestra; Kappa 

Phi; Fresh. Counselor; Home Ec Club; Pan- 

hellenic Council; YWCA. 

MATSON, LAWRENCE D. . Smith Center 

Physical Science 



MATTHEWS, JAMES W. . Joplin, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A.I. A., Sec. 

MAXFIELD, BONNA J. . Garden City 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Collegiate 4-H; Kappa Phi; Home Ec Club; 
Purple Pepsters; Hospitality Days' Steering 
Comm.; YWCA. 

MEDLIN, RICHARD P. . . Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering 
Blue Key; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Tau, Treas. 
3; Steel Ring; Phi Lambda Upsilon; 
A.I.Ch.E.,, Pres. 3; S.P.C; Engineering Coun- 
cil; Student Union Comm. 

MEDLIN, ROGER C . . . Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Delta Chi, Pres. 4; Publ. Award; 
Collegian Bus. Mgr. 4. 



MEILI, MARY J Beverly 

Home Economics and Education 
Collegiate 4-H; Fresh. Counselor; Kappa Phi; 
Hospitality Days' Steering Comm.; Wesley 
Foundation; Home Ec Club, Sec-Treas. 4; 
Publicity Club, Pres. 4; Van Zile, Pres. 4; 
Home Ec Exec. Council 4; Delegate to 
Nat'l. Home Ec Convention 4; YWCA. 

MEISNER, DARLENE J. . . Manhattan 

Physical Education 
Kappa Delta; Phems; Frog Club; S.P.C; 
I.S.A.; Intramurals; YWCA. 

MEISNER, JOHN F. . . . Osage City 

Agriculture Administration 
Sigma Nu; Scabbard and Blade; Ag Ec Club; 
Collegiate 4-H; YMCA. 

MELCHER, NEWELL C . . . Ottawa 

Agronomy 
Collegiate 4-H; Klod and Kernel Klub; Jr. 
Division Tri-K Crops Judging Contest. 

MELODY, WILLIAM J. . Gettysburg, S. D. 

Physical Education 
Phi Epsilon Kappa; K-Fraternity; Varsity 
Football 4: 

MERRIMAN, HARRY E. . Manhattan 

Physical Education 
Delta Tau Delta; Varsity Football. 

MERTZ, LOUIS J Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E.; Engineering Open House Comm. 



METTLER, DON E Formoso 

Physical Science 

MILLER, CAROLYN L. . Silver Springs, Md. 

Home Economics 
Alpha Chi Omega, Sec. 4; Home Ec Club; 
YWCA. 

MILLER, JANICE E Oxford 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Kappa Phi; Fresh. Counselor; Collegiate 
4-H; Wesley Foundation; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog. 

MILLER, MARY J Merriam 

Home Economics and Art 
Alpha Delta Pi, Vice-Pres. 4; Home Ec Club; 
Phi Chi Delta; Fresh. Counselor; Interfrat. 
Pledge Council; Panhellenic Council; Hospi- 
tality Days' Steering Comm.; YWCA. 

MILLER, WILFRED T. . . . Winfield 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Veterans Assoc, Commander 3; 
S.P.C; UNESCO; Committee for Student 
Evaluation of Teaching. 

MONCREIF, E. STANTON . . Wichita 

Florticulture and Oranamental Horticulture 
Kappa Sigma. 

MONTGOMERY, ROBERT L. . Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 









Lull, Linton C. 
Lumpkin, Norma G. 
Lundholm, Joe, Jr. 
Lundquist, Clinton E. 
Lyon, George T. 
McCaskill, George A. 
McCauley, Harold H. 



McComb, Cecil N. 
McCormick, Harry H. 
McCrary, Patricia G. 
McCrerey, Ruth 
McDonald, Jane 
McDougal, Luroy 
McFadden, Robert P. 



McGeorge, Dorothy M. 
McGovern, Louis J. 
McGuire, Virginia L. 
McHarg, Robert E. 
Mclntyre, John O. 
McManis, Lawrence E. 
McNabney, Carolyn F. 



McVey, Patricia P. 
Mabie, Richard O. 
Mackintosh, Darlene 
Madden, Bruce B. 
Mahoney, George T. 
Mall, William W. 
Mardiks, David 



Markey, Wiliam R. 
Markham, Peggy J. 
Markley, Mary L. 
Marlow, Shelton W. 
Marshall, Doris J. 
Martin, Anna M. 
Mason, Everett R. 



Mason, James R., Jr. 
Mastin, M. Arlene 
Matson, Lawrence D. 
Matthews, James W. 
Maxfield, Bonna J. 
Medlin, Richard P. 
Medlin, Roger C. 



Meili, Mary J. 
Meisner, Darlene J. 
Meisner, John F. 
Melcher, Newell C. 
Melody, William J. 
Merriman, Harry E. 
Mertz, Louis J. 



Mettler, Don E. 
Miller, Carolyn L. 
Miller, Janice E. 
Miller, Mary J. 
Miller, Wilfred T. 
Moncreif, E. Stanton 
Montgomery, Robert L. 

321 




TS5?< 




Only student representative on the Athletic Council, 
JAMES "DAVE" WEATHERBY . . . four year basket- 
ball letterman . . . Blue Key ... Phi Epsilon Kappa 
. . . Tau Kappa Epsilon . . . Who's Who . . . 
K-Fraternity. 



NESBIT, CHARLES D. . . Manhattan 
Agricultural Administration 
Alpha Zeta; Block and Bridle, Vice-Pres. 4; 
Ag Ec Club; Ag Assn.; Phi Kappa Phi; Ag 
Barn-warmer Asst.; Sophomore Honors; 
Senior Livestock Judging Team; Student 
Eligibility Comm. 

NEWMAN, ROBERT J. . . Manhattan 
Milling Industry 
Sigma Nu. 

NICHOLS, EARL C. . . . Osage City 

Agricultural Education 
Ag Ed Club; Block and Bridle; Klod and 
Kernel; Second Place Award for Crop Judg- 
ing. 

NICHOLS, ELIZABETH M. . Manhattan 
Music, Graduate 

NICKELSON, SHANNON . . Penokee 

Agronomy 
Alpha Zeta; Klod and Kernel Klub, Treas.; 
Ag Student Staff; Publ. Award; R. P., Ag 
Student, and Collegian Photographer. 

NIGHTINGALE, MAX L. . . Corning 

Busines Administration 
Busines Club; Intramurals. 

NIXON, ELEANOR . . . Manhattan 
Option B 
Home Ec Club; Purple Pepsters; YWCA. 



NORRIS, BETTE JANE .... Salina 

Option B 
Chi Omega, Sec. 2; Phi Chi Delta; Leader- 
ship Council; Frog Club; Intramurals. 

NOYES, NADINE Emporia 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Kappa Phi; Home Ec Club; Waltheim Hall, 
Treas.; YWCA. 

NUTTER, MERLINE .... Peabody 

Option A 
Amicossembly; Keim's Kabana, Pres. 1; 
Women's Tennis Champion 3, 4; Intra- 
murals;; YWCA. 

OLIVER, MARJORIE J Salina 

Medical Technology 
Chi Omega; Alpha Delta Theta; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 



OLMSTEAD, ELAINE L. . . Manhattan 
Option B 
Phi Kappa Phi. 

OLSON, DAVID H. . . . Manhattan 
Business Administration 

OSBORN, RALPH J. . . Independence 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E. 



OSBORN, WALTER O. . . . Mahaska 
Animal Husbandry 

OTTEN, BILL H Wichita 

Civil Engineering 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; A.S.C.E. 

OTTO, JAMES V Riley 

Milling Chemistry 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Vice-Pres. 2, Pres. 3; 
Alpha Mu; Memorial Chapel Comm.; Ag 
Assn.; Milling Assn.; Intramurals. 

PACE, PANFILLO L. . Bridgeport, Conn. 
Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E. 

PACHE, CARL F Home 

Business Administration 

MOODY, RICHARD E. . Holland, Mich. 

Agronomy 
Masonic Club. 

MOORE, DALE L Ashland 

Business Administration 
Business Club. 



MOORE, THOMAS C. . . . Syracuse 

Business Administration 

MOREEN, THOMAS R Salina 

Business Administration 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Royal Purple, Bus. 
Mgr. 4; Publ. Award; Social Calendar 
Comm.; Business Club. 

MORRISON, KENNETH J. . Howard 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub. 

MORTON, RAYMOND L. . . Wamego 
Option B 
Sigma Nu. 

MOSES, JOSEPH R McLouth 

Mechanical Engineering 

MOSHER, HAROLD N. . . . Alden 

Physical Education 

MOSIER, E. LOUISE Hoxie 

Home Economics 
Clovia Vice-Pres.; Purple Pepsters; S.P.C.; 
Home Ec Club; Hospitality Days' Chairman 
4; Collegiate 4-H; Who's Whoot Staff; Fresh. 
Counselor; Intramurals; YWCA, Sec. 3. 



MOUNKES, DARREL G. . . Emporia 

Agricultural Education 

MOUNT, WILLIAM J. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering 

MUDGE, HARRY W., JR. . . Gridley 

Dairy Manufacturing 
Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Dairy Club; Dairy 
Cattle Judging Team; Collegiate 4-H. 

MUIRHEAD, RUTH . . Shreveport, La. 

Option B 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Glee Club; Publ. 

Award; Panhellenic Council; R. P. Beauty 

Queen Attendant; YWCA. 

MYERS, CAROLYN T. . Springfield, Mass. 

Physical Science 
Leadership Council; A. I. A.; K-State Players; 
K-State Engr. Staff; Math Club; I.S.A.; Ami- 
stad; Intramurals; YWCA. 



MYERS, JOAN R Galva 

Option B 
Pi Beta Phi; Canterbury Club; Interfrat. 
Pledge Council; I.S.A.; Eastern Star; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

MYERS, ROBERT R. . . . Clay Center 

Business Administration 



NATHAN, JOSEPH B., JR. . . Wichita 

Chemical Engineering and Physical Science 
Acacia; Vice-Pres. 2; A.I.Ch.E.; Flying Club; 
Yellow Dog. 

NEELEY, BERNICE J. . . . El Dorado 

Option A 
Club Cervantes; Kappa Phi; I.S.A.; Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

NEELEY, WILLIAM G. . . . Earleton 

Animal Husbandry 

NEFF, ARTHUR W Ulysses 

Geology, Graduate 

NEIGHBOR, HOWARD D. . . . Iola 

Industrial Journalism 
Tau Kappa Epsilon; Radio Guild; Quill Club; 
Alpha Phi Omega. 

PAGE, NAOMI R Hazelton 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Collegiate 4-H; Home Ec Club; YWCA. 

PALMER, JEAN A Manhattan 

Business Administration 



PAPIN, JACKIE L. . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Biological Science 
Kappa Alpha Psi. 

PARCEL, CLAIR K. . . . Coldwater 

Animal Husbandry 
Farm House ;Alpha Zeta, Vice-Pres. 4; Block 
and Bridle, Vice-Pres. 2, 4; Collegiate 4-H; 
Senior Parting Gift Comm.; Jr. Livestock 
Judging Team. 

PARSONS, JOHN L. . . . Manhattan 
Agronomy 
Alpha Zeta; Tri-K. 

PATTERSON, DUANE T. . . Topeka 

Industrial Journalism 
Delta Tau Delta; Sigma Delta Chi; K-Club; 
Baseball 2; Royal Purple Staff 4. 

PATTERSON, HERMAN D. . Lorraine 

Physical Science 
Alpha Kappa Lambda. 

PAYNE, BETTY SUE . . Burlingame 

Medical Technology 
PAYNE, VONA C. . . . Kansas City 

Home Economics and Education 



PEARCE, HARRY A., JR. . Manhattan 

Physical Science 
Theta Xi. 

PEARCE, WAYNE A. . . . Baldwin 

Agriculture 

PEARSON, ROBERT J. . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

PENN, WALLACE E. . San Fernando, Cal. 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Veterans' Assn. 

PENNAK, ROY F. . . . Cincinnati, O. 
Landscape Design 
Horticulture Club. 

PERKINS, CAROLINE . . Manhattan 
Home Economics and Food Research 
Alpha Xi Delta; Omicron Nu; Home Ec 
Club; Fresh. Counselor; Sigma Eta Chi, 
Treas. 2, 3, Pres. 4; K-State Players; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

PETERSON, FREDERICK H. . Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E., Vice-Pres.; Steel Ring; Alpha Phi 
Omega; Engineers' Open House Comm. 



Moody, Richard E. 
Moore, Dale L. 
Moore, Thomas C. 
Moreen, Thomas R. 
Morrison, Kenneth J. 
Morton, Raymond L. 
Moses, Joseph R. 



Mosher, Harold N. 
Mosier, E. Louise 
Mounkes, Darrel G. 
Mount, William J. 
Mudge, Harry W., Jr. 
Muirhead, Ruth 
Myers, Carolyn T. 



Myers, Joan R. 
Myers, Robert R. 
Nathan, Joseph B., Jr. 
Neeley, Bernice J. 
Neely, William G. 
Neff , Arthur W. 
Neighbor, Howard D. 



Nesbit, Charles D. 
Newman, Robert J. 
Nichols, Earl C. 
Nichols, Elizabeth M. 
Nickelson, Shannon 
Nightingale, Max L. 
Nixon, Eleanor 



Norris, Bette Jane 
Noyes, Nadine 
Nutter, Merline 
Oliver, Marjorie J. 
Olmstead, Elaine L. 
Olson, David H. 
Osborn, Ralph J. 



Osborn, Walter O. 
Otten, Bill H. 
Otto, James V. 
Pace, Panfilo L. 
Pache, Carl F. 
Page, Naomi R. 
Palmer, Jean A. 



Papin, Jackie L. 
Parcel, Clair K. 
Parsons, John L. 
Patterson, Duane T. 
Patterson, Herman D. 
Payne, Betty Sue 
Payne, Vona C. 



Pearce, Harry A., Jr. 
Pearce, Wayne A. 
Pearson, Robert J. 
Penn, Wallace E. 
Pennak, Roy F. 
Perkins, Caroline J. 
Peterson, Frederick H. 

323 





Collegiate 4-H club president, RICHARD "DICK" 
WINGER . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . Alpha Zeta 
. . . Block and Bridle . . . Scabbard and Blade 
. . . S.P.C. . . . Chapel Committee . . . Student 
Union Committee. 



PETERSON, JOHN L. . . . Lawrence 

Mechanical Engineering 
PETERSON, LEROY A. . . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Band; Track Numeral. 

PETERSON, LOYD E Kinsley 

Civil Engineering 
Sigma Tau, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Engineering 
Council, Pres. 4; Steel Ring; A.S.C.E.; Blue 
Key; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Band; 
Who's Who; Phi Kappa Phi. 

PETERSON, NOBEL K. . . . Garrison 

Soil Conservation 
Scabbard and Blade; Klod and Kernel Klub; 
ROTC Open House Comm. 

PETERSON, PAUL M. . . McPHERSON 

Business Administration 

PETERSON, VERLIN H. . . . Clifton 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub. 

PETRO, ROBERT K Topeka 

Agriculture Administration 
Beta Theta Pi; Danforth Scholarship; Band; 
Dairy Club; Ag Ec Club; Ag Student Staff; 
Intrarnurals. 



PETTIT, ROBERT L. . . . Neodesha 

Physical Science 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

PFEFFER, JAMES R Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 

PHILLIPS, BYRON B. . . . Manhattan 

Organic Chemistry, Graduate 

PIERCE, BERNARD T. . . Manhattan 

Agriculture Engineering 

PIERPOINT, HAROLD W. . . Benedict 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; Sigma Tau; Pi Mu Epsilon; 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog. 

PIFFER, PATRICIA J. . . Kansas City, Mo 

Medical Technology 
Pi Beta Phi; Prix, Sec-Treas. 3; Phi Chi 
Delta; Alpha Delta Theta; Leadership Coun- 
cil, Pres. 1; "Tiny-Y ", Co-Ed. 2; Publ. Award, 
1, 2; Panhellenic Council, Pres. 3; Intra- 
rnurals; YWCA. 

PIXLEY, MARGARET A. . . Cimarron 

Home Eco?iomics 
Collegiate 4-H; K-State Players; Kappa Phi, 
Treas. 4; Omicron Nu; Wesley Foundation; 
I.S.P., Sec-Treas. 2; I.S.A. Delegate to Nat'l. 
Meeting; Who's Who; S.P.C; Phi Kappa Phi 
| Fresh. Recog.; Sears Scholarship; Home Ec 
- Club Scholarship. 



POAGUE, LOWELL L. . . . WaKeeney 

Business Administration 
Sigma Nu. 

POLAND, HAROLD D. . . . Barnes 

Business Adt?iinistrction 
Business Club; Men's Glee Club; Veterans 
Assn.; YMCA. 

POSTLETHWAITE, JOHN E. . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; Sigma Tau; A.S.M.E.; Engi- 
neer's Open House Comm. 

POSTLETHWAITE, MARION E. 

Manhattan 
Agronomy 
Phi Kappa Phi; Gamma Sigma Delta. 

POTTER GEORGE C. . . . Manhattan 

Industrial Chemistry 
A.Ch.S. 

POWELL, DEAN O Ford 

Business Administration 
Amistad; Business Club. 

PRIBBLE, BEVERLY B Salina 

Radio 
Pi Beta Phi; Radio Guild, Sec. 3; Glee Club; 
K-State Players; I.S.A.; Interfrat Pledge Coun- 
cil; Publ. Award; Intrarnurals; YWCA. 



PRICE, HAROLD W. . . . Anthony 

Physical Science 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

PRICE, VONDA G. . . . Clay Center 

Biological Science 
Kappa Phi; Collegiate 4-H; Annex 4, Pres.; 
Ag Barnwarmer Queen 2. 

PRUDEN, JAMES E. . . Cincinnati, Ohio 

Animal Husbandry 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Veterans Assn.; Ag. 
Barnwarmer Comm. 

QUAKENBUSH, ETHAN A. . . Sublette 
Agronomy 
Klod and Kernel Klub; Veterans' Assn., 
Treas 3; Poultry Club; Collegiate 4-H. 

QUINLISK, WARREN W. . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Steel Ring. 

RALSTON, GLEN D Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

RAMSEY, CARROL D. . . Uniontown 

Home Economics 
Omicron Nu, Treas. 4; Home Ec Publ. Club; 
Fresh. Counselor; Collegiate 4-H; Sigma Eta 
Chi; Congregational Student Fellowship; Pal 
O'Mie, Treas. 3, Vice-Pres. 4. 



RAMSEY, WILLIAM R. . . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 

RANSOM, DONALD E. . . Kansas City 

Architectural Engineering 

READY, IRMA L Wichita 

Child Welfare 
Home Ec Club; Home Ec Service Club; Col- 
legiate 4-H; Baptist Youth Fellowship; Theta 
Epsilon, UNESCO; YWCA. 

REARDON, LUCY E Colby 

Home Economics and Education 
Chi Omega; Home Ec Club; A Cappella; 
Frog Club; Intrarnurals. 

REDMOND, M. PATRICIA . . . Erie 

Clothing Retailing 
Collegiate 4-H; Home Ec Publ. Club; K-State 
Players; Fresh. Counselor; YWCA. 

REIFF, JOHN J Sanger, Calif. 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Delta Psi Omega; 
Wesley Foundation. 

REINHARDT, FREDRICK A. . Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 



REINHARDT, JOY Z. . . Manhattan 

Home Economics and Art 

Omicron Nu; Phi Chi Delta; Quill Club, 

Pres. 4; Home Ec Service Club; UNESCO;. 

YWCA. 

RHOADES, RAYMOND W. . Decatur, 111. 

Mechanical Engineering 

RICE, KENNETH H. . . Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering 

RICHARDS, FRANK P. . . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma; Steel Ring; A.S.M.E. 

RICHARDS, WILLIAM H. . Manhattan 

Milling Industry 
Beta Theta Pi; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Who's 
Who; Alpha Zeta; Blue Key; Ag Student 
Staff; Alpha Mu; K-Fraternity; Newman 
Club, Pres. 3; Ag Barnwarmer Comm. Ch.; 
Ag Council; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; 
Sophomore Honors; Basketball 3, Golf 3. 

RICKERT, WILLIAM A. . . Marysville 

Business Administration 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Business Club. 

RICKLEFS, RALPH B Salina 

Landscape Design 
Beta Theta Pi. 

RIEB, JACK L St. Francis 

Mechanical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta, Pres. 4; Pi Tau Sigma; 
Sigma Tau; Engineers' Open House Comm. 

RIEG, BILL Wichita 

Chemical Engineering 

RIFFEL, EDWARD D. . . . Stockton 

Agriculture 

RIGGS, FLETCHER E. . . Richmond, Mo. 

Agricultural Administration 
Alpha Zeta; Ag Ec Club, Treas 4; UNESCO; 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Forums Comm. 

RIGGS, MARVIN L. . . Conway Springs 

Animal Husbandry 
Alpha Zeta; Religious Feder., Pres. 4; Bap- 
tist Youth Fellowship; Block and Bridle; 
Collegiate 4-H; Who's Whoot; Ag Ed Club; 
YMCA. 

ROBERTSON, CARLTON J. 

Jackson, Miss. 
Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Sigma Delta Chi. 

ROCHAT, GLEN E Wilsey 

Physical Education 

ROCK, MARIE Navarre 

Physical Education 
Phems, Sec-Treas. 3, Pres. 4; Collegiate 4-H; 
Purple Pepsters, Sec. 4; Frog Club, Sec- 
Treas. 4; Intrarnurals. 

ROCKERS, JAMES J Greeley 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub; S.P.C; Newman 
Club. 
ROGERS, THOMAS T. . . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Business Club. 

ROLF, FLOYD E Pratt 

Agricultural Administration 
Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Ag Ec Club, Vice- 
Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Collegiate 4-H; Phi Kappa 
Phi Fresh. Recog.; Sophomore Honors; Ag 
Student Staff Bus. Mgr. 3; Sears Roebuck 
Scholarship; Intrarnurals; YMCA. 

ROLLER, OPAL E Circleville 

Home Economics 

ROLLS, CLARENCE R Thrall 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; Sigma Tau; A.I.E.E. 

ROOD, MARY H Peabody 

Mechanical Engineering 
Kappa Delta, Vice-Pres. 2, 3; A.S.M.E., Sec. 
3, 4; Math Club; Glee Club; Intrarnurals; 
YWCA. 



Peterson, John L. 
Peterson, Leroy A. 
Peterson, Loyd E. 
Peterson, Nobel K. 
Peterson, Paul M. 
Peterson, Verlin H. 
Petro, Robert K. 



Pettit, Robert L. 
Pfeffer, James R. 
Phillips, Byron B. 
Pierce, Bernard T. 
Pierpoint, Harold W. 
Piffer, Patricia J. 
Pixley, Margaret A. 



Poague, Lowell 
Poland, Harold D. 
Postlethwaite, John E. 
Postlethwaite, Marion E. 
Potter, George C. 
Powell, Dean O. 
Pribble, Beverly B. 



Price, Harold W. 
Price, Vonda M. 
Pruden, James E., Jr. 
Quakenbush, Ethan A. 
Quinlisk, Warren W. 
Ralston, Glen D. 
Ramsey, Carrol D. 



Ramsey, William R. 
Ransom, Donald E. 
Ready, Irma L. 
Reardon, Lucy E. 
Redmond, M. Patricia 
Reiff, John J. 
Reinhardt, Frederick A. 



Reinhardt, Joy A. 
Rhoades, Raymond W. 
Rice, Kenneth H. 
Richards, Frank P. 
Richards, William H. 
Rickert, William A. 
Ricklefs, Ralph B. 



Rieb, Jack L. 
Rieg, Bill 
Riffel, Edward D. 
Riggs, Fletcher E. 
Riggs, Marvin L. 
Robertson, Carlton J. 
Rochat, Glen E. 



Rock, Marie 
Rockers, James J. 
Rogers, Thomas T. 
Rolf, Floyd E. 
Roller, Opal E. 
Rolls, Clarence R. 
Rood, Mary H. 

325 





Top flight scholar and sportsman, WILLIAM "BILL" 
RICHARDS . . . Blue Key . . . Beta Theta Pi 
. . . Freshman and Sophomore Honors . . . Alpha 
Mu . . . Who's Who . . . Ag Council . . . Two 
Sport Letterman. 



ROSEBERRY, CYRILKA B. . . Wichita 

Option A 
Alpha Delta Pi; Spanish Club; Intramurals. 

ROSENOW, RICHARD V. . Clay Center 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub. 

ROTTINGHAUS, BERNARD H. 

Corning 

Mechanical Engineering 
Phi Kappa; A.S.M.E.; Engineers' Open House 
Comm.; Intramurals. 

ROTTY, HELEN L. . . Kirkwood, Mo. 

Foods and Food Research 
Phi Kappa Phi; Omicron Nu; Home Ec 
Service Club; Amicossembly; Canterbury 
Club. 

ROY, CHARLES H. . . Overland Park 

Agronomy 
Tri-K; Masonic Club; Westminister Founda- 
tion; Crops Judging Team. 

RUTSCHMANN, EDWIN F. . Maple Hill 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E. 



RYAN, CHARLES L. 



Manhattan 



Business Administration 



RYAN, DELLA M. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Retail Merchandising 

SAMUELSON, GRACE I. . . . Weskan 

Business Administration 
Kappa Phi; Business Club; Collegiate 4-H; 
Wesley Foundation; Freshman Class, Sec. 

SANDERS, PHILIP Miller 

Agricultural ]ournalism 

SANDERSON, DALLAS A. . . Hamilton 

Business Administration 

SCALAPINO, RALPH A. . . . Everest 

Biological Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Williston Geology 
Club. 

SCARBOROUGH, NIRA . . . Wichita 
Option B 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; YWCA, Sec. 4. 

SCHARDEIN, PHYLLIS M. . Nickerson 
Home Service 
Eaastern Star; Bowling. 



SCHINDLER, JUNE Salina 

Home Economics and Art 

Home Ec Club; Phi Chi Delta; Hospitality 

Days' Steering Comm.; UNESCO; YWCA. 

SCHIRMER, DAVID E Holton 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Block and Bridle; K- 

Fraterntiy; Senior Class Vice-Pres.; Varsity 

Football. 

SCHMIDT, FRANCIS W. . . Catherine 

Business Administration 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT A Lyons 

Chemical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Phi Lambda Upsilon; A.I.Ch.E. 

SCHMIDT, VIRGINIA R. . . . Newton 

Home Economics and Education 
Kappa Delta, Pres. 4; Purple Pepster; S.P.C.; 
Kappa Phi; Home Ec Club; Hospitality Days' 
Steering Comm.; Intramurals; YWCA. 

SCHMIDT, WINSTON A. . . . Lyons 

Architectural Engineering 
Beta Theta Pi. 
SCHMITT, AUDREY . . Pawnee Rock 
Home Economics 
Alpha Delta Pi. 



SCHMITT, BERNARD L. . . Manhattan 

Business Administration 
Business Club; Mortar & Ball. 
SCHNEIDER, RAYMOND C. . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 

SCHOVEE, MARY LOU . . . Topeka 

Foods Demonstration 

Pi Beta Phi; Home Ec Club; Newman Club; 

Intramurals; YWCA. 

SCHOWENGERDT, MARJORIE J. 

Wamego 
Home Economics and Education 
Prix; Omicron Nu; Mortar Board; Who's 
Who; Home Ec Club; Junior Class Sec; 
Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Collegiate 
4-H; Kappa Phi. Pres. 4; Religious Feder., 
Pres. 2, 3; Wesley Foundation Cabinet; 
S.P.C.; I.S.A.; UNESCO; Fresh. Counselor; 
YWCA. 
SCHRADER, JOSEPH E. . Kansas City, Mo. 
Soil Conservation 
Newman Club; Klod and Kernel Klub. 
SCHROEDER, LOREN D. . . . Beverly 
Electrical Engineering 
K-Fraernity; A.I.E.E.; Varsity Football 2. 

SCHRUBEN, JOHN H. . . . Stockton 

A rchitectural En gin eering 
Phi Kappa Phi; Student Architect's Associa- 
tion; Fresh, and Soph. Honors. 



SCHUPBACH, ELEANOR H. . Lancaster 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Collegiate 4-H; Home Ec Club; Lutheran 
Students Asm; Omicron Nu; YWCA. 

SCHWARTZ, VICTOR A. . Arkansas City 

Electrical Engineering 

SCHWEIGER, FRANK A. . . . Arma 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Tau Sigma, Sec. 4; Phi Kappa Phi. 

SCOTT, CATHERINE J. . . . Garnett 

Option A 
A. I. A., Sec. 4; Jr. Arch. Org., Sec. 4; Frog 
Club. 

SEDLOCK, ROBERT E. . Kansas City, Mo. 
Agriculture 
Phi Kappa. 

SEIFFE, JO ANN Y. . . . Manhattan 
Option B 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sec. 2; Kappa Phi; 
Royal Purple Staff; Purple Pepster, Vice- 
Pres. 3; Fresh. Recog; Leadership Council; 
Intramurals; YWCA. 

SELLERS, ERNEST E. . . . Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta; Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; 
Eta Kappa Nu; Steel Ring; Blue Key; I.R.E.; 
Engr. Council, Vice-Pres.; Who's Who. 



SELLERS, GABE A., JR. . . Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta, Sec. 2; Sigma Tau, Vice- 
Pres. 4; Pi Mu Epsilon; Eta Kappa Nu; 
Steel Ring; K-State Engr., Feature Ed. 4; 
I.R.E., Sec. 4; Westinghouse Achievement 
Award; Who's Who; Engineers' Open House 
Comm.; Apportionment Board. 

SETTER, MARJORIE I. . . Manhattan 

Industrial journalism 
Newman Club; Collegian Staff, Bus. Mgr. 3; 
Publ. Award; Intramurals. 

SHANK, HARRY E Bazine 

Agriculture 
Tri-K; Sears Scholarship; Collegiate 4-H; 
Band; Intramurals. 

SHAPIRO, EUGENE . . Rutherford, N. J. 

Electrical Engineering 

SHARP, GUY L El Dorado 

Physical Education 

SHELLEY, GUY M., JR. . . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Nu; Pi Tau Sigma; Sigma Tau; Steel 
Ring; A.S.M.E.; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. 
Recog.; Engineers' Open House Comm.; Intra- 
murals. 

SHELOR, MARION E Bloom 

Agricultural Engineering 



SHERRELL, ROY L Lincoln 

Physical Education 

SHIELDS, HAROLD L. . . Muncy, Penn. 

Milling Industry 
Alpha Mu; Scabbard and Blade. 

SHOOP, MARION H. . . . St. John 

Business Administration 
S.'gma Phi Epsilon. 

SHUPE, JOHN W Mt. Hope 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Vice-Pres. 2; Pi Tau Sigma, 
Pres. 4; Blue Key; Sigma Tau; Who's Who; 
A.S.M.E.; Board of Student Publications; K- 
State Engineer, Assistant Editor; Freshman 
Football; Varsity Basketball 2; Varsity Tennis 
2; K-Fraternity. 

SHUPP, DANNY E. . . . Tulsa, Okla. 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 

SIGSBEE, GEORGE B, JR. . Dodge City 

Civil Engineering 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 

SILER, LEANNA M. . . . Garden City 

Music Education 
Promusica; Band; Orchestra; YWCA. 



SIMOX, PAULINE J. . . . Kansas City 
Home Economics and Education 
Home Ec Club; Hospitalaity Days' Steering 
Comm.; Amistad; Chaparajos. 






SIMKINS, CHARLES A. . . . Reading 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub; Newman Club; Intra- 
murals. 

SIMMONS, HERBERT W. . . . Salina 
Business Administration 
A Cappella. 

SIMMONS, JOHN W Abilene 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Nu. 

SIMPSON, MARY L. . . . Leonardville 
Option B 
Christian Youth Fellowship; Glee Club; 
YWCA. 

SINGER, HERBERT O . . New York, N. Y. 

Psychology, Graduate 

SIRON, KAY R Pleasanton 

Biological Science 
Econ. Justice Comm., Ch.; Collegiate 4-H; 
YMCA. 



Roseberry, Cyrilka B. 
Rosenow, Richard V. 
Rottinghaus, Bernard H. 
Rotty, Helen L. 
Roy, Charles H. 
Rutschmann, Edwin F. 
Ryan, Charles L. 



Ryan, Delia M. 
Samuelson, Grace I. 
Sanders, Philip 
Sanderson, Dallas A. 
Scalapino, Ralph A. 
Scarborough, Nira B. 
Schardein, Phyllis M. 



Schindler, June 
Schirmer, David E. 
Schmidt, Francis W. 
Schmidt, Robert A. 
Schmidt, Virginia R. 
Schmidt, Winston A. 
Schmitt, Audrey 



Schmitt, Bernard L. 
Schneider, Raymond C. 
Schovee, Mary Lou 
Schowengerdt, Marjorie 
Schrader, Joseph E. 
Schroeder, Loren D. 
Schruben, John H. 



Schupbach, Eleanor H. 
Schwartz, Victor A. 
Schweiger, Frank A. 
Scott, Catherine J. 
Sedlock, Robert E. 
Seiffe, JoAnn Yapp 
Sellers, Ernest E. 



Sellers, Gabe A., Jr. 
Setter, Marjorie I. 
Shank, Harry E. 
Shapiro, Eugene 
Sharp, Guy L. 
Shelley, Guy M., Jr. 
Shelor, Marion E. 



Sherrell, Roy L. 
Shields, Harold L. 
Shoop, Marion H. 
Shupe, John W. 
Shupp, Danny E. 
Sigsbee, George B., Jr. 
Siler, LeannaM. 



Simcox, Pauline J. 
Simkins, Charles A. 
Simmons, Herbert W. 
Simmons, John W. 
Simpson, Mary L. 
Singer, Herbert O. 
Siron, Kay R. 

327 



1 , --•■ ad 






A man of varied interests, WARD A. KELLER . . . 
Recreation Committee . . . Open House Committee 
. . . Intramurals . . . Student Council . . . Who's 
Who ... Pi Tau Sigma . . . Sigma Tau . . . 
Delta Tau Delta . . . Interfrat. Pledge Council. 

SIZEMORE, RICHARD T. . . Parsons 

Architectural Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Blue Key; Engineering Council; 
Steel Ring; K-State Engineer Staff; Engineers' 
Open House, Mgr. 4; Who's Who; Varsity 
Basketball. 

SKELTON, JESSE D Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Sigma Tau; 
Phi Kappa Phi; A.I.E.E., Sec. 3; Engineers' 
Open House, E. E. Ch. 4; Band. 

SLAWSON, CHARLES J. . Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu, Pres. 4; Sigma Tau; Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

SMITH, BOB L Emporia 

Civil Engineering 
Sigma Tau. 

SMITH, DALE F. . . . Arkansas City 

Industrial Chemistry 
A.Ch.S.; Veterans' Assn. 

SMITH, GEORGE E Shawnee 

Agriculture 

SMITH, GERALD M Garnett 

Mechanical Engineering 
Pi Omega Pi; Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa Phi; Pi 
Tau Sigma. 



SMITH, KEITH C Oil Hill 

Mechanical Engineering 

SMITH, MARY E Coffeyville 

Biological Science 
Kappa Phi; Wesley Foundation; Collegiate 
4-H; Hills' Heights, Pres. 4; Amicossembly; 
Commonwealth Political Party, Sec. 4; S.P.C. 

SMULL, MARGARET M. . . Caldwell 

Bacteriology, Graduate 

SMULL, NEIL H Bird City 

Architecture, Graduate 

SNOWBARGER, MARIETA I. 

Marienthal 
Option B 

SNYDER, EMELIE K Topeka 

Home Economics and Art 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; K-State Players; 
Band; Orchestra; A Cappella; Frog Club; 
Sec-Treas. 3. 



SNYDER, EUGENE E. . . Junction City 

Physical Education 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



SOBER, BONNIE L Sabetha 

Home Service 
Kappa Phi; Amistad, Home Ec Club; Col- 
legiate 4-H; YWCA. 

SORENSEN, JUNE E. . . McPherson 

Food Demonstration 
Pi Beta Phi; Eastern Star Club, Vice Pres. 4, 
Pres. 4; Fresh. Counselor; Chapel Comm.; 
Home Ec Club; Hospitality Days' Steering 
Comm.; Publ. Award; Intramurals; YWCA. 

SPENCER, GODFREY M. . Manhattan 
Industrial Arts 
Kappa Sigma. 

SPENCER, HARVEY G. . . . Whiting 

Chemical Engineering 

SPRINGER, GLENN E Salina 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; A.S.M.E. 

SPRINGER, NEOLA M. . . Galesburg 

Home Economics and Education 
Home Ec Club; Kappa Beta, Treas. 4; Pal 
O Mie, Pres. 4; Fresh. Counselor. 

STALEY, MARY JO. . . . El Dorado 

Option B 
Chi Omega. 



STALLARD, PHILLIP L. . . . Parsons 

Civil Engineering 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

STEDHAM, THELMA J. . . . Salina 
Option B 
Pi Beta Phi; Phi Alpha Mu; Eastern Star; 
Theta Epsilon; Hist, and Gov't. Club. 

STEELE, WILLIAM T Parsons 

Soil Conservation 
Klod and Kernel Klub. 

STEPHENSON, EVERETT S. . Wichita 

Agricultural Administration 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Block and Bridle. 

STEVENS, DONALD L. . . Kansas Ctiy 

Architectural Engineering 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

STEWART, BENNIE L. . . Hutchinson 

Business Administration 
Phi Delta Theta; Pi Epsilon Delta; K-State 
Players; Business Club; Student Union Plan- 
ning Comm.; Royal Purple Staff; Intra- 
murals; YMCA. 

STEWART, ROBERT H. . Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering, Graduate 



STONER, DALE W. . . . Concordia 

Business Administration 
Business Club. 

STRICKLIN, LORETA M. . . Agenda 
Home Economics 
Clovia; Who's Who; Omicron Nu; Prix; 
Religious Feder.; Kappa Beta, Vice-Pres. 4; 
Home Ec Publ. Club, Vice-Pres. 4; Collegiate 
4-H; UNESCO, Corres. Sec. 4; C.S.F.; Stu- 
dent Eval. of Teaching Comm.; S.P.C; 
Student Union Comm.; Danforth Fresh. 
Award; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh. Recog.; Mortar 
Board Recog.; Omicron Nu Fresh. Award; 
Van Zile Hall Scholarship Award; Home Ec 
Hospitality Days' Steering Comm.; YWCA. 

STROBEL, VADALINE A. . . Garfield 

Home Economics 
STROWIG, BARBARA H. . . . Salina 

Music Education 

STRUTT, INEZ E Woodston 

Music Education 

STURDEVANT, JAMES W. . Altoona 

Animal Husbandry 
Block and Bridle. 



STURDEVANT, LOIS E. . 

Home Economics 



Cimarron 



SUITER, CLANTON T Otis 

Business Administration 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Mortar and Ball; Business 
Club; A.I.E.E.; Intramurals; Track. 

SWANSON, JOHN W., JR. 

Red Bank, N.J. 

Chemical Engineering 
A.I.Ch.E.; Veterans' Assn. 

SWANSON, RICHARD S. . Concordia 

Architectural Engineering 
Sigma Nu, Pres. 3; Sigma Tau; Steel Ring; 
Student Architects Assn.; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog. 

SWEARINGEN, RALPH E. . . Logan 

Business Administration 
Masonic Club. 

SYFERT, ERVIN W Wichita 

Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture 
Acacia, Treas. 3; Glee Club; Horticulture 
Club; Masonic Club, Treas 4. 

SYLER, ROBERT T Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E.; I.R.E. 

TAMBLYN, ELIZABETH E. . Kansas City 
Biological Science 
Cosmopolitan Club; Canterbury Club. 



TASKER, JOHN H., JR. . . . Caney 

Agricultural Journalism 

TAYLOR, BETTY N. . . . Manhattan 

Option B 

TAYLOR, DEAN B. . . Independence 

Mechanical Engineering 

TAYLOR, DOROTHY L. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Business Administration 
Baptist Youth Fellowship; Business Club; 



YWCA. 



Manhattan 



TAYLOR, EULA MAE . 

Music 
Mu Phi Epsilon, Treas. 3, 4; Gamma Delta, 
Sec. 4; Promusica, Treas. 2; American Guild 
of Organists; YWCA. 

TAYLOR, HARRIETT F. . . Enterprise 

Medical Technology 
Alpha Delta Theta. 

TAYLOR, MARLIN R. . Independence 

Mechanical Engineering 



TAYLOR, WESLEY U. . . . Bentley 

Industrial Physics 

TEAFORD, MARY E. . . . Manhattan 
Option B 

TEMPLETON, VANCE N. . . . Logan 

Bus in ess Adm inistration 

TERRILL, MARION L. . . Hutchinson 

Music Education 
Mu Phi Epsilon, Vice-Pres. 3, Sec. 4; Col- 
legiate 4-H; Promusica; A Cappella; Sigma 
Eta Chi; Panhelenic Council; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog.; Intiamurals; YWCA. 



THOMAS, WALTER R. . 

Physical Science 
Theta Xi, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 
murals. 



Belleville 
4; Intra- 

Emporia 



THOMAS, WAYNE D. . . 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu. 

THOMPSON, WILBUR G. . Winchester 

Electrical Engineering 
A.I.E.E. 



Sizemore, Richard T. 
Skelton, Jesse D. 
Slawson, Charles J. 
Smith, Bob L. 
Smith, Dale F. 
Smith, George E. 
Smith, Gerald M. 



Smith, Keith C. 
Smith, Mary E. 
Smull, Margaret M. 
Smull, Neil H. 
Snowbarger, Marieta I. 
Snyder, Emelie K. 
Snyder, Eugene E. 



Sobers, Bonnie L. 
Sorensen, June E. 
Spencer, Godfrey M. 
Spencer, Harvey G. 
Springer, Glenn E. 
Springer, Neola M. 
Staley, Mary Jo 



Stallard, Phillip L. 
Stedham, Thelma Jo 
Steele, William T. 
Stephenson, Everett S. 
Stevens, Donald L. 
Stewart, Bennie L. 
Stewart, Robert H. 



Stoner, Dale W. 
Stricklin, Loreta M. 
Strobel, Vadaline A. 
Strowig, Barbara H. 
Strutt, Inez E. 
Sturdevant, James W. 
Sturdevant, Lois E. 



Suiter, Clanton T. 
Swanson, John W., Jr. 
Swanson, Richard S. 
Swearingen, Ralph E. 
Syfert, Ervin W. 
Syler, Robert T. 
Tamblyn, Elizabeth E. 



Tasker, John H., Jr. 
Taylor, Betty N. 
Taylor, Dean B. 
Taylor, Dorothy L. 
Taylor, Eula Mae 
Taylor, Harriett F. 
Taylor, Marlin R. 



Taylor, Wesley U. 
Teaford, Mary E. 
Templeton, Vance N. 
Terrill, Marion L. 
Thomas, Walter R. 
Thomas, Wayne D. 
Thompson, Wilbur G. 

329 




i < 





*«** *~J tf**J 




With intentions of becoming a Home Demon- 
stration Agent, MARGARET PIXLEY . . .Sears 
Scholarship . . . I.S.A. . . . S.P.C. . . . K-State 
Players . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Home Ec Scholar- 
ship . . . 4-H. 



THROCKMORTON, MILDRED T 

Coffeyville 
Option B 
Alpha Delta Pi; Newman Club; Interfrat. 
Pledge Council; Leadership Council; YWCA. 

TICE, REBECCA J. . . . Hutchinson 

Physical Education 
Chi Omega; Phems; Purple Pepsters; Intra- 
murals; YWCA. 

TICHENOR, RUTH E. . . . Abilene 

Physical Education 
Phems; Amicossembly; Phi Chi Delta; Col- 
legiate 4-H; Intramurals; YWCA. 

TIMMERMEYER, MILDRED A. . Wichita 
Home Economics 
Home Ec Club; Newman Club; Amistad. 

TJADEN, MAURICE E. . . Clearwater 

Civil Enginering 
A.S.C.E. 

TOBUREN, MERRILL W. . Manhattan 

Industrial Chemistry 
Alpha Kappa Lambda. 

TROXELL, MARION D. . Arkansas City 

Business Administration 



TROXELL, NORMAN F. . Arkansas City 

Business Administration 

TOGGLE, BEATRICE . . ClayCentef 

food Research 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Omicron Nu, Sec. 4; 
YWCA. 

UHL, ROBERT J. . . . Smith Center 

Electrical Engineering 
Kappa Sigma; Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu; 
I.R.E. 

UTERMOEHLEN, DORIS M. . Lebanon 

Option B 
Annex II, Pres. 2; Business Club. 

VANDAGRIFF, DON H. 

Weather ford, Tex. 
Milling Chemistry 



VANDERBUR, CHARLES A. . Manhattan 

Business Administration 

Phi Kappa Phi; Fr., Soph., and Jr. Honors. 

VANDERWILT, LAWRENCE M. 

Solomon 

Electrical Engineering 



VAN HORN, C. DUANE . Little River 

Business Administration 
Theta Xi; Collegiate 4-H; YMCA. 

VAN SICKEL, VINCENT T. . Marysville 

Mechanical Engineering 

VAWTER, RUFUS L., JR. . Coffeyville 
Industrial Arts 
Band; Glider Club; Engineers' Open House 
Comm. 

VICKERS, DON C Abilene 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E.; Engineers' Open House, Sec. 3, 
ME Chr. 4. 

VICORY, FREEMAN M. . . Greenleaf 

Civil Engineering 

VICORY, HAROLD B. . . Greenleaf 

Business Administration 

VIEUX, O. O Wilmore 

Industrial Journalism 
UNESCO; Chaparjos; Young Republican 
Club Chr.; YMCA. 

VOGT, ELMER Meade 

Business Administration 

VOLKEL, GEORGE D Lenora 

Electrical Engineering 
Kappa Sigma; Mortar and Ball; A.I.E.E; 
Intramurals. 

VOLKENING, VADA V. . . . Alma 
Clothing Retailing 
Omicron Nu, Treas.; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma 
Eta Chi, Pres.; Collegiate 4-H; Congregational 
Student Fellowship; Amicossembly, Vice- 
Pres.; Amistad; YWCA. 

VYFF, Alvin D Lebanon 

Option B 

VYFF, BEATRYSE P. . . . Murdock 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 
Alpha Xi Delta. 

WADDELL, CAROLYN S. . Manhattan 
Home Economics 

WALKER, DONALD C . . Dodge City 

Industrial Chemistry 
A.Ch.S.; Band; Orchestra. 



WALKER, HOWARD W. . Manhattan 
Electrical Engineering 

WALKER, JAMES G Newton 

Geology, Graduate 

WALKER, TOM B. . . Detroit, Mich. 

Citizenship Education 

WALSH, JOSEPH M. . . Hutchinson 

Business Administration 

WALTERS, JEAN E. . . . Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing 
Purple Pepsters; Home Ec Council, Sec. 

WALTERS, KENNETH L. . . Horton 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 

WALTON, THEODORE P. . Manhattan 

Industrial Arts 
I.A.S., Vice-Pres.; Glee Club; Engineers' 
Open House Comm. 



WARD, EVA M Jewell 

Business Administration 
Alpha Chi Omega, Treas. 3; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Business Club; Royal Purple Staff 3; Publ. 
Award; Student Directory Editor 4. 

WARD, FLOYD R Centralia 

Agricultural Administration 
Farm House; Ag Ec Club, Sec. 3; Col- 
legiate 4-H; Scholastic Eligibility Comm.; 
Intramurals. 



WARD, LINTON E. . . 

Civil Enginering 
A.S.C.E. 



Concordia 



WARNER, HELEN M. . . . Thomas 

Home Economics, Graduate 

WARREN, EDWIN C. . . . Sterling 

Electrical Engineering 
Eta Kappa Nu; Band. 

WARREN, EMMETT J. . . . Topeka 

Civil Engineering 

WARREN, RICHARD B. . Arkansas City 

Animal Husbandry 



WATKINS, CHARLES B, JR. . Frankfort 

Physical Education 

WATTS, CHESTER L Pratt 

Option B 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Pres. 2; Inter-Frat. 
Council, Vice-Pres. 1; YMCA. 

WEATHERBY, JAMES D. . Neodesha 

Physical Education 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

WEAVER, MARY A Alma 

Child Welfare and Euthenics 
Kappa Delta; Home Ec Club; Radio Club; 
Band; Fresh. Counselor; Hospitality Days' 
Steering Comm.; Home Ec Club, Vice-Pres. 
4; La Verne Noyes Scholarship; Panhellenic; 
I.S.A. 

WEBBER, JACK S. ... Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 



WEBER, JACK A. . . 

Option B 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Jackson, Miss. 



WEEKLEY, GEORGE H, JR. 



South Haven 



Chemical Engineering 
A.I.Ch.E.; Phi Lambda Upsilon 



WEISS, CAROLYN A. . Kansas City, Mo. 
Option B 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Home Ec Club; 
Royal Purple Staff; YWCA. 

WEISSBACK, ANNETTE B. . Topeka 

Home Economics and Education 
Newman Club; Home Ec Club. 

WELLS, JOHN D Elmdale 

Physical Science 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; Williston Geology 
Club. 

WELLS, MARY F Viola 

Industrial Journalism 
Kappa Phi; Collegiate 4-H. 

WELLS, RUTH I. ... Adrian, Mo. 

Food Economics and Nutrition, Graduate 

WEMPE, CHARLES M. . . . Seneca 

V eterinary Medicine 
Phi Kappa. 

WENGER, DWIGHT A. . . Oberlin 

Mechanical Engineering 



Throckmorton, Mildred T. 
Tice, Rebecca J. 
Tichenor, Ruth E. 
Timmermeyer, Mildred A. 
Tjaden, Maurice E. 
Toburen, Merrill W. 
Troxell, Marion D. 



Troxell, Norman F. 
Tuggle, Beatrice 
Uhl, Robert J. 
Utermoehlen, Doris M. 
Vandagriff, Don H. 
VanDerbur, Charles A. 
Vanderwilt, Lawrence M. 



VanHorn, C. Duane 
VanSickel, Vincent T. 
Vawter, Rufus L., Jr. 
Vickers, Don C. 
Vicory, Freeman M. 
Vicory, Harold B. 
Vieux,0. O. 



Vogt, Elmer 
Volkel, George D., Jr. 
Volkening, Vada V. 
Vyff, Alvin D. 
Vyf f , Beatryse P. 
Waddell, Carolyn S. 
Walker, Donald C. 



Walker, Howard W. 
Walker, James G. 
Walker, Tom B. 
Walsh, Joseph M. 
Walters, Jean E. 
Walters, Kenneth L. 
Walton, Theodore P. 



Ward, Eva M. 
Ward, Floyd R. 
Ward, Linton E. 
Warner, Helen M. 
Warren, Edwin C. 
Warren, Emmett J. 
Warren, Richard B. 



Watkins, Charles B., Jr. 
Watts, Chester L. 
Weatherby, James D. 
Weaver, Mary A. 
Webber, Jack S. 
Weber, Jack A. 
Weekley, George H., Jr. 



Weiss, Carolyn A. 
Weissbeck, Annette B. 
Wells, John D. 
Wells, Mary F. 
Wells, Ruth I. 
Wempe, Charles M. 
Wenger, Dwight A. 

331 








Wfim :\r. 1IVJ mMm 




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^MS L m ' j. : \\i ~fm 





Graduating with 2.9 average, GABE SELLERS, 
JR. . . . member Apportionment Board . . . Engineer 
Magazine . . . Sigma Tau . . . Eta Kappa Nu . . . 
Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Delta Tau Delta . . . Radio 
Club . . . Who's Who. 



WERNER, MORRIS W. . . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering 

WERTENBERGER, ROBERT O. 

Washington 

Civil Engineering 

WESCHE, BERYL A. . . . Manhattan 

Biological Science 

Chi Omega; Phi Kappa Phi Fr. Recog.; 
Panhellenic Council; Intramurals; YWCA. 



WHEELOCK, JOHN R. . 

Industrial Arts 



Manhattan 



Olathe 



WHITENACK, RAY M. . . 

Electrical Engineering 

A.I.E.E., Vice-Ch. 3; Ch. 4; Engineering 
Council; Steel Ring. 

WHITESIDE, ALBERT E. . . Fort Scott 

Electrical Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta. 



WICHERS, HENRY W. . . Manhattan 

Option A 

WICK, LEON L Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 

WILCOX, CARMEN K. . Minneapolis 

Physical Education 
Phi Epsilon Kappa, Sec. 4; K-Fraternity; 
Scabbard & Blade; Cadet Officers Club, 
Vice-Pres. 4; Track 3-4. 

WILCOX, NANCY L. . . Hutchinson 

Business Administration 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Vice-Pres. 4; Purple 
Pepsters, Sec. 4; K-State Players; Interfrat. 
Pledge Council; Home Ec Club; I.S.A.; Busi- 
ness Club, Treas. 4; Kappa Beta; Phi Kappa 
Phi Fresh. Recog.; Intramurals; YWCA. 

WILCOX, PATTY J Topeka 

Home Economics 



WILDER, CLYDE P., JR. 

ElDorado Springs, Mo. 
Agriculture 



WILKIE, GEORGE T Topeka 

Civil Engineering 
A.S.C.E. 

WILKINSON, REBECCA E. 

San Angelo, Tex. 

Arts and Sciences 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

WILKOWSKE, ROGER H. . . Emporia 

Dairy Manufacturing 

Farm House, Treas. 3; Alpha Zeta, Biennial 
Conclave Delegate; Dairy Club, Treas. 3; 
Collegiate 4-H; Sears Roebuck Scholarship; 
YMCA. 

WILLIAMS, EARL E. . . Baxter Springs 

Animal Husbandry 

Block and Bridle; Poultry Science Club; Vet- 
erans' Assn.; Intramurals. 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM D. . . Wichita 

Architectural Engineering 



WILLIS, PEGGY C. . . . Manhattan 
Home Economics 
Chi Omega. 

WILSON, CLYDE R Wichita 

Business Administration 
Beta Theta Pi. 

WILSON, DAVID O Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

Delta Tau Delta; Scabbard and Blade; Engi- 
neering Council; A.S.M.E., Pres. 4; Intra- 
murals. 

WILSON, JAMES W Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 

WILSON, ROBERT R., JR. . Council Grove 

Electrical Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E; Sigma Tau; I.R.E. 

WINGER, RICHARD . . . McCune 

Agriculture 

Alpha Gamma Rho, Sec. 3; Interfrat Pledge 
Council; Collegiate 4-H, Pres. 4; Alpha Zeta, 
Sec. 4; Scabbard and Blade, Sec. 4; Block 
and Bridle; Senior Livestock Judging Team; 
Student Union Comm., Ch.; Phi Kappa Phi 
Fresh. Recog.; UNESCO; S.P.C.; Intramurals; 
Student Council; YMCA. 



WINGERD, HARVEY K. . 

Business Administration 
Intramurals. 



Navarre 



WILKE, MIRIAM . . 
Option B 



Topeka 



WINTER, GLEN D. . . . Hoisington 

Business Administration 

WIRTZ, LEO A Great Bend 

Business Administration 

WOLF, PAUL D Emporia 

Business Administration and Option B 

Men's Glee Club, Pres. 3; Hist, and Gov't. 
Club; Intramurals. 

WOOD, LEONARD E . . . Burr Oak 

Chemical Engineering 

Acacia, Pres. 3; Steel Ring, Vice-Pres. 3; 
Phi Lambda Upsilon, Vice-Pres. 3; Sigma 
Tau; Blue Key; Wampus Cats; Interfrat 
Council; Junior Class Treas.; Student Coun- 
cil, Vice-Pres. 4; Who's Who; Fresh, and 
Soph. Honors; Intramurals. 



WOOD, MARGARET R. . . Mankato 

Option A 
Band; Orchestra; Kappa Phi; YWCA. 



WOODS, JOHNIE J. . Prairie View, Tex. 
Poultry Husbandry, Graduate 

WOOLGAR, NORMAN . . Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 

A.S.M.E., Pres. 4; Pi Tau Sigma, Pres. 4; 
Sigma Tau; Pi Mu Epsilon; Engineering 
Council. 

WOOLLEY, HARRIET .... Salina 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 
Canterbury Club; Home Ec Publ. Club. 

WORTMAN, DARRELL G. . Independence 

Mechanical Engineering 
A.S.M.E. 

WRIGHT, DELORES F. . . . Wichita 

Physical Science 

YARNELL, ROBERT W. . . Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Kappa Lambda; West Stadium, Treas. 
3; SPEBSQSA. 



YELLEY, CLIFFORD R. . . ElDorado 

Business Administration, Graduate 

YOUNG, DEWEY H. . . Clay Center 

Civil Engineering 
Steel Ring; A.S.C.E., Vice-Pres. 4; 

ZELEZNAK, MICHAEL G. . Kansas City 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Steel Ring; A.S.C.E. 
Newman Club; K-Fraternity, Vice-Pres., 4 
Mortar and Ball; Sophomore Class President 
Junior Class Vice-Pres.; Freshman Football 
Numeral; Varsity Football Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ZOLLINGER, JOE E. 



Junction City 



Mechanical Engineering 
Siema Nu; Pi Tau Sigma; Scabbard and 
Blade, Treas. 4; Cadet Officers Club, Treas.; 
A.S.M.E.; A Cappella; Mortar and Ball; 
Engineers' Open House Comm.; Collegiate 
4-H; Rifle Team, 4. 

BRUBAKER, MARILYN 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics and Nursing 
Delta Delta Delta; Nursing Club; Sigma 
Theta Tau; Intramurals; YWCA. 

CASTATOR, AVIS W. . . Nickerscn 

Home Economics and Nursing 
Sigma Theta Tau; Nursing Club; YWCA. 



SIEGELE, JESSIE Olathe 

Nursing 

UNRUH, VIOLA F Newton 

Nursing 
Chi Omega; Nursing Club; Intramurals; 
YWCA. 



Werner, Morris W. 
Wertenberger, Robert O. 
Wesche, Beryl A. 
Wheelock, John R. 
Whitenack, Ray M. 
Whiteside, Albert E. 



Wichers, Henry W. 
Wick, Leon L. 
Wilcox, Carmen K. 
Wilcox, Nancy L. 
Wilcox, Patty J. 
Wilder, Clyde P., Jr. 



Wilke, Miriam 
Wilkie, George T. 
Wilkinson, Rebecca E. 
Wilkowske, Roger H. 
Williams, Earl E. 
Williams, William D. 



Willis, Peggy C. 
Wilson, Clyde R. 
Wilson, David O. 
Wilson, James W. 
Wilson, Robert R., Jr. 
Winger, Richard 



Wingerd, Harvey K. 
Winter, Glen D. 
Wirtz, Leo A. 
Wolf, Paul D. 
Wood, Leonard E. 
Wood, Margaret R. 



Woods, Johnie J. 
Woolgar, Norman 
Woolley, Harriet 
Wortman, Darrell G. 
Wright, Delores F. 
Yarnell, Robert W. 



1 r i 



Yelley, Clifford R. 
Young, Dewey H. 
Zeleznak, Michael G. 
Zollinger, Joe E. 
Brubaker, Marilyn 
Castator, Avis W. 



Siegele, Jessie 
Unruh, Viola F. 



333 





THE LIFE, the spirit, the courage of an old Hill like me comes from only one source — its under- 
graduates. They are the ones whose voices raise to a roar at a touchdown or boo a referee, the 
ones who wash over me like a tide, fill my rooms with their ceaseless questions and laughter. 

They are the public, who praise me if things go right for them and bitterly shout their disapproval 
if things go wrong. People all over the country have taken their turn at writing about what goes on 
on the Hills of today. Sometimes I see these articles and have a good chuckle. No one can see the 
whole picture of what my students do, think or feel except me. I am their foundation, their counselor 
and their guide toward the future. 

Being a rather silent Hill, I won't attempt to tell you the attitudes — the many complexities of 
those who make up my population. You probably wouldn't believe me, anyway. 

Sometimes, I get a little tired of the never-ending tide of youth that sweeps across my face. They 
chatter timelessly about who has a date with whom, why they got a B instead of a C, whether or not 
they should sneak out of library, and what the old so-and-so did when they cut his class. 

They talk about their best friend, beer, the nitrogen cycle, the jawbone of a dogfish, the amount 
of sleep they got, the term paper that is due tomorrow, how many times they've been in love, the 
break-down of the washing machine, the word for garage in Portugese, AC and DC currents, who paid 
for the cokes last night, the works of Thomas Dekker, and what they did — or didn't do — in high 
school. 

335 



The stretch out on my grass to study or sleep between classes. They sleep in classes. They throw 
cigarettes all over my face and they talk about me behind my back — but I forgive them. 

I have a generous nature — if you don't believe it, take note of all the punishment I have taken 
for the last eighty-five years. I have a solid rock constitution and a heart of limestone. 

Sometime, they'll be glad I was here, those underclassmen. Someday, they'll learn to appreciate my 
true beauty, grace and wisdom. I realize gratitude is not a universal virtue, but one time they'll be 
grateful to me. 

Some of these underclassmen stay a long time — some only a semester. The way I always look at 
that is, if they don't like me, I don't like them either. They can take me just the way I am or get off. 
A few get off. 

But, in spite of all this, I am happy to see the dawning of each day, with drowsy students trudg- 
ing back to me. Glad to feel their feet knocking aside blades of grass or slipping on my icy sidewalks. 
Glad to hear the grinding of pencil sharpeners, the scratch of pen on paper — even the soft snore dur- 
ing a comprehensive lecture. 

These who are here now are the counterparts of all the tens of thousands who have gone before. 
They are alike, and yet they are different. They are my friends, and yet they condemn me. They are 
my students, and yet they do not listen to my teaching. They must learn for themselves. 

But, I must give underclassmen this much credit — they have made me what I am today. I would 
never be able to do so much for students of today had not their predecessors done as much for me. I 
get along with them pretty well. For that matter, I have to. Were it not for their presence, I might be 
just another cornfield. 




336 






Juniors struggle (upper right) with English Profici- 
ency Tests, in which a passing grade is required for 
graduation. Twenty per cent flunked this year — an 
all-time high. Maybe that accounts for the deep 
concentration on the faces above. 



Home ec girls cast their ballot (center) after the 
raucous campaign for class officers. The Common- 
wealth and All-College parties boasted progressive 
platforms and torchlight rallies for their candidates. 



Judiciously marking their ballots for their choice for 
class officers are students in the vet school (bottom). 





fyall (ZetfiAtkatian 



An early fall enrollment brought crowds of hot students 
flocking back to Kansas State. A long line of H's wait 
(above) for dean's cards, the first step in the process. 



Just inside the door is the end of the first line. Here dean's cards 
are received, (center left) and K-Staters move on to fill out in- 
formation cards. 



Click! goes the shutter on freshmen only (lower left). Pictures 
are taken for transcripts and for further indentification. Part of 
the registration system was changed last fall to accomodate the 
huge numbers of students in the same amount of time. 



AlM(j,HA44,<f, 9& JdatUf flab 



Veterans queue up for the extra lines involved in G. I. Bill red 
tape (upper right). Here, on the second floor of Anderson, they 
separate from the rest of the crowd to go through a process all 
their own. 




■ i 

i 



"I'm sorry, but that class has just been closed," are familiar words 
from the assigners' tables (center). Students and instructors pon- 
der over schedules and hours for the coming semester. 



Checks change hands across the desks of the cashier's office (lower 
left) as students pay fees and tuition. 



QinUked tf-ox, A 



Checkers hunt for assignment errors, keep part of the double- 
handful of papers collected during enrollment (upper left). 



1 ■■--■ 


■ -■ r: ■...,:.,., ,..-,-. ■■ - 




| I 




"Oh happy day!" shouts coed as she passes the portals of the 
final door with assignment, activity book and a few days of 
freedom before classes begin. 



Activity books are handed out (lower right) in exchange for receipts 
from cashier. Students eagerly wait to see the numbers on the 
tickets and how the games have been apportioned between the 
odd and even books. 




t^BBmm&aBBUwa&gmm 




Top Row 

Abbott, Gerald D Augusta 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Abelson, Arlene R Iola 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Ackerman, D. Gene . . . . Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Acre, Robert E., Jr Bucklin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Adams, Henry J Belleville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Adams, Howard C Merriam 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Adams, Mary E Tulsa, Okla. 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Adams, Patricia S Norton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Adams, Paul Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Adams, Ralph L Dexter 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Adams, Robert T., Jr. ... Hoisington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Adams, Willis E Great Bend 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Addington, Janice L. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Adee, Barbara L Belleville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Adee, Martha M Wells 

Junior in Home Economics 

Adell, Dorothy E Neodesha 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Adell, Wendell H Neodesha 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Aiken, John M La Harpe 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 



Ainslie, Harry R. . . . Hartwick, N. Y. 

Junior in Agriculture 
Akins, Howard D Abilene 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Al-Ani, Hussain Y Ana, Iraq 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Albee, Patricia A Hiawatha 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Albers, Arthur W Bendena 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Albers, Byron A Bendena 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Albora, John M Paterson, N. J. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Albrecht, Oscar W Herington 

Junior in Agriculture 

Alderman, Kenneth M Lyons 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Alderman, Margaret Lyons 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Alefs, E. June Great Bend 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Alexander, Donald L. . . . Junction City 

Junior in Agriculture 

Alexander, James R Manhattan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Alexander. Richard M. . . . Wellington 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Allen, Charlotte I Ogden 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Fourth Row 

Allen, Christine E Olathe 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Allen, Dale K. . Olathe 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Allen, Donald L Overland Park 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Allen, Joyce M Arkansas City 

Junior in Home Economics 

Allen, Roscoe R Oswego 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Allen, Warren M Ogden 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Allen, William T Bison 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Allgire, G. Wayne Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Allingham, Robert M. . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Allphin, Don J Arlington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Almquist, Lo Ree Great Bend 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Almquist, Orpha Glee . . . Great Bend 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Alsafar, Thabit A Ana, Iraq 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Altepeter, Joseph F Parsons 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Amerine, Marie T Penalosa 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Amrine, Raymond D Winfield 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Amstutz, John J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Anderson, Carolyn I Admire 

Junior in Home Economics 

Anderson, Elden M Oberlin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Anderson, Forrest M Roxbury 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Anderson, Joyce L Canton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Anderson, Karl D Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 





Wmm\mmBmummm .Jmmwmm^ v . H Hlnflil I fl He- mm 



Top Row 

Anderson, Robert L Clyde 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Anderson, Robert W Kinsley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Anderson, Ruth E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Anderson, Wallace R Greenleaf 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Anderson, Wayne W. . . Ft. Madison, la. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Anderson, Wendell S Americus 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Anderson, William D Cantcn 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Andrews, Hcv/ard D Topeka 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Andrisevic. James F. ... Kansas City 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Apel, J. Dab Longton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Apollo, Calvin A Fredonia 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Arand, Harvey L Belvue 

Junior in Agriculture 

Archer, Rex D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Arensman, Elnora M Kinsley 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Argabright, H. Joan .... Hiawatha 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Armitage, J. Connie .... Hutchinson 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Armstrong, Charles D Muscotah 

Junior in Agriculture 



Arndt, Albert E. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Arnold, Dean W Lindsborg 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Arnold, Don L Lindsborg 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Arnold, Iris R Galesburg 

Junior in Home Economics 

Arnold, Loren G Whiting 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Third Row 

Arnold, Maurice E Marysville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Arnold, Ralph C Rczel 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Arnold, Robert F Marysville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Art, Oren G Westphalia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Artman, Phyilis C Mt. Hope 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Asher, Herbert W Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Asher, Madeline Great Bend 

Junior in Home Economics 

Asher, Reginald K. . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ashlock, Drma L Merriam 

Junior in Home Economics 

Aspelin, Esther P Dwight 

Junior in Home Economics 

Asper, Darw'n E Oxford 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Atkinson, Richard, Jr. ... El Dorado 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Atteridge, George S., Jr. . Chatham, N.J. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Atwell, Leroy S Utica 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Atwood, Margaret I Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Aubel, William F Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Auerbach, Gerald G Wichita 

Special in Engineering and Architecture 



Aufdemberge, Melvin 



Lincoln 



Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Austin, Margaret L Lola 

Junior in Home Economics 

Averill, Charles E. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Aye, William R Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ayers, Terry V Neodesha 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



WITH A SONG IN THE AIR, 82 students practice 
for A Cappella choir under the direction of Prof. 
Luther Leavengood. Following their annual Christ- 
mas Vespers, choir members started practice for a 
five day tour of Kansas high schools. 




Top Row 

Babb, Beverley A Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Babcock, Elliot R Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Backman, Howard D Vliets 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bacon, Leonard W. . . . Omaha, Nebr. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bacon, Peter J Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Badders, George S., Jr Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Baden, Alfred J Independence 

Junior in Engineering aitd Architecture 
Bader, Robert S. . . . Falls City, Nebr. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Badgley, William A. ... Neodesha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Badley, Maurice T Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Baehr, William M. ... Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Baertch, V. Sue Soldier 

Junior in Home Economics 

Baetz, William J Smith Center 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bailey, Arlo H Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bailey, Keith E Topeka 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bailey, Robert E Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bailey, Robert V Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bair, Mary L Minneola 

Freshman in Home Economics 



Bair, Ross T., Jr Minneola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Baird, Leland R Logan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Baird, M. Catherine Attica 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Baker, Alice M Holton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Baker, Aloysius M Atchison 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Baker, Barbara J Wapello, la. 

Junior in Home Economics 

Eaker, Burl D Kingman 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Baker, Gilbert L Holyrood 

Jtmior in Engineering and Architecture 

Baker, Glenna M Axtell 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Baker, Homer F., Jr Enterprise 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Baker, James C St. Joseph, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Baker, John C, Jr Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Baker, Leonard E Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Baker, Natalie A Newton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Baker, Patricia L Kingman 

Junior in Home Economics 

Fourth Row 

Baker, Philip J Lyons 

Junior in Arts and Scineces 
Baker, Raymond E Atchison 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Balderson, Charles J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Baldwin, Frances L Oxford 

Junior in Home Economics 
Baldwin, James G Blue Rapids 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Baldwin, Mark E Kingsdown 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Eallou, Corliss J Delphos 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bandel, Arnold F Alma 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Banman, Alvin K, Jr Centralia 

Freshman in Engineering and Agriculture 

Barb, Gayle E Augusta 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Barb, Melvin V . Augusta 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Barber, Dorothy J Ransom 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barcellina, Dwain F Osage City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barclay, Nelda E Wakefield 

Junior in Home Economics 

Bare, Chester L, Jr Protection 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Barger, Donald R Cambridge 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Barham, Doran W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Barham, Shirley L Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Barker, Barbara L Lamed 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barker, Jared W Stilwell 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Barlow, Martha A Humboldt 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barndollar, Pratt, Jr Coffeyville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 









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&LmsA 




HP .4,., ,. 
wKJmKx m 



Top Row 

Barnes, Bill J Topeka 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Barnes, E. Louise . ... Manhattan 
Junior in Home Economics 

Barney, Duane L Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Barnowski, Kenneth J. . Royal Oak, Mich. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barnowski, Walter J. . . Royal Oak, Mich. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barr, J. Albert Downs 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Barr, M. Rosamary Leoti 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Barr, Robert E McPherson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Barrett, Edgar C Anthony 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Barrett, Fred F Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Barrett, Paul C Topeka 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Barrett, Reva Jean .... Wamego 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Barrett, Theodore F. . . . Kansas City 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Barrett, Wallace L Herington 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Barstow, Janis Larned 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Barta, John P., Jr Manchester 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bartel, Earl J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Bartels, Wayne A. . . Sioux City, Nebr. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bartlett, Gailand D. ... Dodge City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bartley, Derrill G Horton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Barton, Ada A Junction City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bascom, George S Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Bascom, John U Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bates, Card V Hays 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Bathurst, Verne M Allen 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Batt, Robert A Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Batten, Clifford J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Batten. George F., Jr. ... Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Battin, James M Stafford 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Battin, Mary E Manter 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Eauersfeld, Ruth A Fredonia 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Bauman, Nellie C Sabetha 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Baxter, Charles D Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Eaxter, Leslie K, Jr Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Baxter, William M Circleville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bayles, Janice M. . . Silver Spring, Md. 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bean, Charles G Hutchinson 

Freshman in Engineering and Arcihtecture 

Bearce, Loren S. . . . Falls City, Nebr. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Beat, Arthur A Kingman 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Beaver, Earl S Olathe 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Beaver, James O Olathe 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Bebermeyer, Dorothy .... Abilene 
Junior in Home Economics 

Beck, Gale D Rago 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Beck, Hayes B Manhattan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

WITH AN ARM FULL OF THE NEW ANTI-FLU 
JUICE, another student checks out of the new tem- 
porary hospital. Completed during the fall term, the 
student hospital sparkles with bright new equipment 
— and nurses. 

- 

\h . 

am 

4Si 






Top Row 

Beck, Leon D Leonardville 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Beck, Virginia K Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Beckenhauer, William H. . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Becker, Alice M Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Becker, Alvin R Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Becker, Charles E Logan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Beeby, Patricia B Wakeeney 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Beeby, Patrick A Manhattan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Beeman, Everett D Morrowville 

Junior in Agriculture 

Beemer, Harold W. . . . . Carlton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Beezley, Eugenia R Girard 

Junior in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Beggs, Joan L Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Behrent, Paul A. . . ... Selden 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Beightel, Paid R. . ... Holton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Beitenbucher, Howard L. Trenton, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bell, Jack E Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bell, Jack F Perry 

Junior in Agriculture 

Bell, Kenneth E Paola 

Junior in Agriculture 



Bell, Leland S Merriam 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bell, Robert L Merriam 

Junior in Agriculture 

Bell, Willis E Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Bellinger, Clifford M. .. . Fort Scott 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Beltz, Quinlin D Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bemis, R. Guy Ellsworth 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bender, Kenneth R Ellsworth 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bender, Louis B., Jr Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bengtscn, Herman L Lindsborg 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Bennett, Frederick L Burrton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bensing, Robert G Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Benson, Earl E Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Benson, Joe C, Jr Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Beougher, Clifford E Parsons 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Berger, Barbara Ann . . . McPherson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Berghaus, Gene Meade 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Bergmann, Glenn M Axtell 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Berndt, Alan A Glasco 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Berndt, Robert E Glasco 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Berner, William C Clifton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Berrie, Donald R Winfield 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Berry, Delbcrt W Lenora 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Berry, Donna B Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Berry, Hardy D Lenora 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Berry, Nancy J El Dorado 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Berte, Allen E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Bertschinger, Harold W. . . Lecompton 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Beshears, Jack R Clay Center 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Best, Josephine M Hazelton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Eettenbrock, Dorothy A. . . Brookville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Betz, Leona M Enterprise 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Betz, Loine Enterprise 

Junior in Home Economics 

Betz, Martha L Glen Elder 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bhear, James A Holton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bickle, Donald G Hays 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bideau, Edwin H Chanute 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bienhoff, Edgar H Kensington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 




0^*% 0^'{ ^^^ 







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c c* c* c> 











Top Row 

Bierly, Gail E Iola 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Biery, Phyllis Jean Clyde 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bigler, Robert H. ... Wiggins, Colo. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Billingsley, Leslie .... Kansas City 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Billington, Lois M Edna 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Binford, Ray W Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

BLd, Bennie Protection 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Bird, Frederick C Olathe 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bird. Max J Albert 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bird, M. Ted Albert 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Birk, Phyllis P Gridley 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Bisagno, Robert D Augusta 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Bisbee. William R Plains 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bischof , John O Abilene 

Freshman in Enginering and Architecture 

Bishop, Carolyn M Gypsum 

Junior in Home Economics 

Bitts, M Idred L Pomona 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Blackburn, Ben L Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Blackman, JoAnn Hill City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Blackman, Merrill E McPherson 

Junior in Enginering and Architecture 



Blackwelder, Joann Pratt 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Blaha, Bea Niles 

Junior in Home Economics 

Blair, Marjorie J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Blair. Robert O Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Blanchard, Albert R. . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Blanchrt, Arthur J St. Marys 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Blaser, Loren F Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Blecha, Carol | Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Blecha, Phyllis J Wellington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Blinn, Donald P Beloit 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Blood, Rolla L Salina 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bloomquist, Harley V. . . . Osage City 
Freshman in Agriculture 

Bloyd, Gerald L Lincoln 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bluhm, Vernon A Herkimer 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Blythe, Albert W. . . . White City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Boatright, Helen M Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Boatwright, Virgil E Clements 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bochaus, Dorothy H Newton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bodine, Virgil W Mission 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bogina, August, Jr Girard 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bogue, Jerry A Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bogue, Richard J .Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bogue, Robert E Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bohling, Victor L Meade 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Bohnenblust. Dale J Riley 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON LAB— in a ronsorial clip- 
joint' — was a routine for K-State sheiks. Students 
usually came out short, or at least thoroughly 
trimmsd. Coeds got the hair-curling treatment too, 
but theirs was more permanent. 




Top Row 

Bohnenblust, Marilyn F. . . Minneapolis 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Boice, Marilyn A Great Bend 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Boisvert, Frances D. . . . Osawatomie 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Boldenow, Willard K. . . . Hoisington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Boles, John W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Enginering and Architecture 

Boles, Ronald J Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Boley, Loren D Wakarusa 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Boley, Lyle T Manhattan 

Junior in V eterinary Medicine 

Bollinger, Thyra G Beeler 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Bolton, Phillip E. ... Council Grove 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bond, William C Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Boner, Boyd W Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bonnett, Bernetta J. . . . Smith Center 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bookwalter, Earl C Halstead 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Boone, Mary M Madison 

Junior in Home Economics 

Booth, Ray E Jetmore 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Borck, Fred A Blue Rapids 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Borck, Helen M Blue Rapids 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Borland, William H, Jr. . . Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Born, Wilbur D Penokee 

Junior in Agriculture 

Borror, Martin A Westphalia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Borst, George E Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 
Borst, William H Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bortz, Richard E Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Boutwell, Betty Jane Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Bowen, Elvin L Longford 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bower, Ida H Osage City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bowman, Evelyn M Larned 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Bowman, C. Ray Abilene 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Boyd, Richard A Pittsburg 

Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 

Boyer, Boyd B Meade 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Boyles, Rodney T Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Boys, Fay L Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Fourth Row 

Bozanic, Milton .... Lander, Wyo. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bozeman, Earl G Nickerson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Bracken, William J Leona 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bradbury, George, Jr. . . . Minneapolis 
Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 

Bradley, Bill B Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bradley, Frances A Ft. Riley 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bradley, Robert B Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Bradley, William F. . . . Blue Mound 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bradshaw, Jeanne M. ... McPherson 

Junior in Home Economics 

Brady, Bowen H Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brady, James E Logan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Brady, Joseph J Wichita 

Junior in Agriculture 

Brainard, Olive R Carlyle 

Junior in Home Economics 
Brake, Benjamine R. . . . Blue Rapids 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Brakebill, Mary C . . . Sharon Springs 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Branan, Kathryn J Claflin 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Branan, Robert L Claflin 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brandt, Harold E Frankfort 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Branson, George M Oak Hill 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Braum, Doris L. . . Washington, D. C. 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Braunagel, Charles L Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Breckenridge, Kathryn A. . . . Norton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



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Top Row 

Bredbenner, Joseph W. . . Berwick, Pa. 
Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Breeden, Lowell D Great Bend 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Brelsford, Clifford D Fall River 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bremner, Robert S. . . . Orleans, Mass. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Breneman, Rodney D. . . . McPherson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Brennan, Lawrence W. . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Brenner, Frances Culver 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brenner, Richard W. . . . Clay Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bretz, Kenneth D Lucas 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Brewer, Dean D Concordia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brewer, Glen C Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Brewer, Joanne B Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Brewer, Robert H Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Brewster, Phil S Mission 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bridge, Thomas E. . . . Medicine Lodge 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bridgewater, William H. . . . Norton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Briles, Virginia L Pomona 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Briscoe, Wilbur S., Jr Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Britt, Alan A Luray 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Broadie, Harold E Ashland 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Broberg, L. Eileen Vesper 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Broce, Deloris R Dodge City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Brock, Don W Blue Mound 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Brockman, Carl W. . . . Junction City 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Brookover, Donald L Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brookover, William H Eureka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Brooks, Jerry D Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brooks, Robert G Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Brose, Gerald L. . . Minneapolis, Minn. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Brotherson, Helen R. Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Brotherson, W. Jerry . . . Kansas City 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, Don E Wellington 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, Don R Oakley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Brown, Donald A Fall River 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Brown, Donald F Anness 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Brown, Donna D . Clyde 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Brown, Everett E Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, Frank C Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Brown, Harold E. . . . Council Grove 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Brown, J. Herbert . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Brown, Jack C Kansas City 

Junior in Agriculture 

Brown, Keith I Sylvan Grove 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, Lois M Osborne 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, Mila D Prairie View 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

MORO COURTS, DORMITORIES FOR SINGLE MEN 
were completed this year. Located just across the 
street from Aggieville (and the picture show) the 
"Splinterville" dorms provided easy access to both 
study and the relief from it. 




Top Row 

Brown, Paul W Great Bend 

junior in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, Richard G., Jr. . Washington, D. C. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Brown, Theodore D Wichita 

Sophomore in Architecture and Engineering 

Brown, Wallace C Wichita 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Brown, Wilbur E Halstead 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Brown, William F Cheney 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Browne, John C Norton 

Sophomore in Engineering and. Architecture 

Brownlee, Harry J Sabetha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Brownlee, William O. . . . Lawrence 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Brubaker, Jack K Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bruce, Robert E Kansas City 

Freshman in Engitieering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Bruenger, Fred E Humboldt 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bruner, Eugene H Paradise 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bruner, Horace W. . . Seminole, Okla. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bruner, Jack R Burns 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bruns, Calvin E Riley 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bryan, Ellsworth V., Jr. . . . Cimarron 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bryan, Harold L Neodesha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bryan, Marilyn R Anthony 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Bryan, Virginia A McPherson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bryan, William J Scranton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bryant, James G Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Buchanan, Marilyn L Calvert 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Buckles, Floy L Manhattan 

Junior hi Arts and Sciences 

Buckles, Lavona May . . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Buehler, Bruce W Bushton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Buehler, Robert H Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bullinger, Lawrence W Canton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bunge, Melvin E Waverly 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Burchfield, C. Stan Anthony 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Burdick, Ralph C. . . . Falls City, Neb. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Burgert, Doris Hillsboro 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Burgess, Nellie M. . . . Petersburg, Va. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Burgwin, Mary Ann .... Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Burket, Leatrice A Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Burklund, Wayne E Abilene 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



Burnette, W. Dorene .... Asherville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Burns, Gordon E Pomona 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Burns, John M Cherryvale 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Burns, Philip D Mayetta 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Burns, Phyllis L Ashland 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Burr, Myron C Kinsley 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Burris, Harold D Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Burroughs, Jonnie C. . . . Miltonvale 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Busby, Alfred S. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Busenbark, Johnny R. . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bush, Leola J Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bush, Marilyn E Eureka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Buster, Don L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Butcher, Frederic D., Jr. . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Butler, Betty Wichita 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Butler, Gail L Topeka 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Butler, Peggy Lou Stafford 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Button, Donald J Great Bend 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Byer, Doris L Stafford 

Sophomore in Home Economics 




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Top Row 

Byerly, Betty M Tribune 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Byerly, Charles S Hutchinscn 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Byler, Mary D Newton 

Junior in Home Economics 

Bynum, Shirky J Kansas City 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Byrd, Glenn W. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Cade, Donald R Pomona 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cadwell, Joseph W. . Broken Bow, Nebr. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Caffrey, Richard D. . . . Mount Hope 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cain, John W., Jr. . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Cain, Richard A Manhattan 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Calderwood, Ailison H. . . . Spring Hill 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Calderwocd, Barbara J. . . . Spring Hill 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Calkins, Helen B Phillipsburg 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Callaghan Anna M Merriam 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Callahan, Bernard E Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Callahan. Frances R Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Callahan, Harold D Garnett 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Callahan, Robert E Coffeyville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Callot, Sherman Atchison 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Campbell, Carol . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Campbell, Dolores J Lakin 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Campbell, Eugene R. New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Campbell, Forest D Wayne 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Campbell, Robert E Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Canfield, Darrel N Oxford 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cannon, William L Wichita 

Junior in Agriculture 

Caplinger, James M. ... Greensburg 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Carey, Kathleen J. . . . Valley Center 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Carleton, Edwin J Coldwater 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Carleton, Thomas J Manhattan 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Carlson, Bernard C Stockton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Carlson, Carl W Clyde 

Junior in Agriculture 

Carlson, Dallas C Elsmore 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Carlson, Norris W Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Carlson, Robert G Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Carlson, Virgil P Smolan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Carnahan, Janice E Garrison 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Carnahan, Quentin N. ... Garrison 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Carpenter, Dewey D. . . . Pawnee Rock 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Carper, Delbert R Lebanon 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Carroll, Stanley L Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Carson, Kenneth D. . . . Hartford, Ky. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Carter, Robert M Halstead 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Carver, Clyde M Miltonvale 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

SHIRT SLEEVED STUDENTS pack the freshly 
painted Auditorium to receive President Eisenhower's 
annual State of the Campus address in the early 
fall. 

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Top Row 

Cary, Cecile M Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Cary, Donna L Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Cary, Harold R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Case, Walace G Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Casement, Nancy Jo Sedan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Casement, Rollin J Sedan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Casey, Patrick S Forsyth, Mo. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Casmer, George S Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Cather, Mary Elizabeth . . . Anthony 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cavin, Lyman E Clay Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cazier, Helen L Topeka 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Cederberg, Richard A. . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Ceranich, Anthony P. . . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Chadd, Bernard K Greensburg 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Chajuss, Tamara . . Fel- Aviv, Palestine 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Chamberlin, Virginia L. . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Chambers, Donald E. . . . Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Chambers, Jacob W Pomona 

Junior in Agriculture 

Ji 



Champeny, Wallace H Oxford 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Champlin, Merl D Cedar Vale 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Chance, Donna Jean . . . Minneapolis 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Chandler, Charles Q Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Chandler, William W., Jr. . . . Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Channell, Glenn L. . . . Dallas, Texas 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Chapin, Bobie T Kansas City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Chapman, Duane E Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Chapman, Mary E Tribune 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Chase, Richard J El Dorado 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Chelstrom, Betty Jean . . . Randolph 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Chenoweth, James M Grinnell 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Chesney, Rodert P Woodston 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Chestnut, William B. . . . Clay Center 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Childress, Donald E Parsons 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fourth Row 

Childs, Dana P Herington 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Chrisman, Louie P Abilene 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Christensen, Stanley C Axtell 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Christian, William A. ... Merriam 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Christiansen, Everett E. . . . Columbus 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Christie, Earnest A Netawaka 

Junior in Agriculture 
Christie, Leta Jean .... Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Christopher, Ninian L Bucklin 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Chronister, Joseph S Pratt 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Chung, Edwin T. . . . Honolulu, T. H. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Church, David C Garnett 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Church, Elwyn L. . . Battle Creek, Nebr. 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 
Clark, Barbara D Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Clark, Bernard E Burr Oak 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Clark, Billy H Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Clark, Daniel W Belleville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Clark, Dwaine E Blue Rapids 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Clark, Eileen Iola. 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Clark, Gerald L Wellington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Clark, Harris K Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Clark, James L Overbrook 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Clark, Karl L., Jr. . . . Brewster, Mass. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 





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Top Row 

Clark, Lawrence L Merriam 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Clark, Shirley J. . . Albuquerque, N. M. 
Sophomore in Arts and, Sciences 

Clark, Ward L Eureka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Clarke, David E Plainville 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Clarke, Richard L Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Clary, Donis E St. George 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Clary, Robert B Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Clayton, Sue E Admire 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Cleavinger, Joseph K. ... Manhattan 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Cleland, Jean E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cleland, Wiilard C Eskridge 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Clemens, Milton A Corning 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Clemens, Rex E Corning 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Clennin, Richard G., Jr. . . . Rye, Colo. 
Junior in Agriculture 

Cline, Donald F. . . . Plainview, Nebr. 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cline, Doris A Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Cline, W. June Kanopolis 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Clinger, James B Augusta 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Clowers, Richard W St. John 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Coady, Betty M. ...... Russell 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Cobb, Alan R Augusta 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Cochran, Ethel B Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Cochran, Helen R Parker 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Coffin, C. Ted .... Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Cofran, Roswell, L., Ill . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Colby, Jane C Smith Center 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Colby, Roger K Smith Center 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Cole, Hobart J Hudson, S. D. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Cole, Robert E Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Cole, Wilbur H Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Coleman, Harold A Horton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Coleman, Maxine G. ... Larkinbury 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Coleman, Robert D Denison 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Coleman, L. Russell . . . Overland Park 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Collinge, Irwin J Emporia 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 



Collins, Barbara N Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Collins, Billy D Columbus 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Collins, Delores J Carbondale 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Collins, Mary L Concordia 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Collins, Norman R Topeka 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Collins, Tennyson I Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Colt, Frank H Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Combs, Donald E Stockton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Combs, Herbert H. . . . Mound Valley 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

STUDENTS FIND EMPLOYMENT in a wide variety 
of occupations. Manhattan stores, restaurants and 
construction firms find an eager crew of student 
workers annually. 




\ 



Top Row 

Compton, L. D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Conkey, Fordyce T Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Conner, John R Selma 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Connor, John W Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Conrad, Katherine S Maige 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Conrad, Raymond F. . . . Junction City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Converse, Faye D Eskridge 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Converse, Verne W Eskridge 

Junior in Agriculture 

Cook, Mary E Courtland 

Junior in Home Economics 

Cook, Sarah A El Dorado 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Cool, Helen E Topeka 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Cool, Vincent J Palco 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Cooley, B. Orlan Abilene 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cooley, Carl R Solomon 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Coombs, Connie R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Coombs, Robert W Bentley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Cooney, Mary F Wilson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cooper, Clarice M Gridley 

Junior in Home Economics 



Cooper, John R Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Cooper, Juanita B Delia 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Cope, Charles W Pratt 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Copt, Christine F Osage City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Cork, Myrna L Page City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Corkill, Philip A Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Cornelius, Marjorie L. . . Westmoreland 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Cory, Verna A Belleville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Cossell, Dorothy J Greensburg 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Cossman, Donald R Wright 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Ccssman, Fred N Wright 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Costello, R. G Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cotner, Melvin Coffeyville 

Junior in Agriculture 

Cotton, Barbara J Ada 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Cotton, Margaret B Ada 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Fourth Row 

Cotts, Arthur C. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Cousins, Arch G Oil Hill 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Cowan, Charles D Ft. Scott 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Cowan, Kenneth W Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Cowdery, Robert D Lyons 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Cowell, Darrell B . Lucas 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Cox, Daniel M Eureka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crackel, Robert E Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Craft, Martha C Garden City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Crandall, Doris Joan LeRoy 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Crandall, Lester L. . . . . . Wichita 

Junior in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Craven, Robert E Marysville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Crawford, Lavon Severy 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Crawford, Miriam M Vermillion 

Freshman in Home Economics 
Crawford, William L. . . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Crenshaw, Carl D. . . Independence, Mo. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Creviston, John R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crippen, James G Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Crissman, Larry R St. John 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Crnkovich, Roman J. . . Waterford, Pa. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crockett, James F Kansas City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Crofoot, John W Cedar Point 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



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Top Row 

Cronk, Donna D Newton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Cronk, Maxine J Newton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Crotinger, Victor R Bison 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crouch, Sara R Liberty, Mo. 

Junior in Home Economics 

Crouch, William M., Jr. . . Hoisington 
Freshman in Agriculture 

Crow, Horace E Hamlin, Texas 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crow, Lawrence L Bennington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crow. Richard D. . . .. Cunningham 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Crowley, Bob R Leon 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Crum, Walter S Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Crump, John E Lakin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Second Row 

Cuculiza, Sergio . . Huanuco, Peru, S. A. 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Cuer, Jane C Kingsdown 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Culbertson, Robert J. . . . Chicago, 111. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Cummings, Clyde E Logan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Cummings, Lois J Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Cunningham, Bruce B. ... El Dorado 

Junior in Agriculture 
Curbey, Royal E LeRoy 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Curnutt, Elmer N Eureka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Currie, Kathleen H. . . . Westmoreland 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Curry, George L Prescott 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Curry, Joseph E Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Third Row 

Curtis, Arch E Lewis 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Cusic, Charlene Ruth .... Topeka 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Dade, Philip E Hutchinson 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Dageforde, Kenneth E Paola 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Dahl, Robert E Manhattan 

Freshman in Etigineering and Architecture 

Dailey, Ruth Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Daily, George W Ashland 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Daily, Harold G Holton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Dalbom, Harold M Viola 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Dalke, Carl D Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dalrymple. Clyde . . . Medford, Ore. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Bottom Row 

Dalton, Vernon E Junction City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dalton, Walter F Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Daly, Robert L Huron 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Dancer, James L Caney 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Daneke, Charles D Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Dannels, Dale G Vermillion 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Dannenberg, Raymond O. . . . Gaylord 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Danner, Clark D Ellsworth 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Darby, Antoinette .... Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Darling, Joyce A Eureka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Darrow, Edgar A Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



COLOR PICTURES OF A COLORFUL CAMPUS 
were taken for the Royal Purple through the courtesy 
of the Eastman Kodak Company, who sent their 
color photographer more than 1500 miles for this 
purpose. 




Top Row 

Davenport, David E ElDorado 

Sophomore in Arts' and Sciences 

Davenport, Donna D ElDorado 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

David, Elizabeth Winfield 

Freshman in Home Economics 

David, Walter E Winfield 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Davies, Dale M Reading 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Davies, J. Clinton Reading 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Davies, James A Minneapolis 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Davies, Margaret E. .... Valley Falls 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Davies, Willa F Liberal 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Davis, Diann Marie .... Wamego 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Davis, Donald E Mulvane 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Davis, Erma L Minneola 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Davis, James C Abilene 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Davis, Patricia A Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Davitt, Frances Jennings 

Junior in Home Economics 

Dawson, Alice Ann Russell 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Day, Thomas L Mound City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Day, Wilborn N Kanorado 

Junior in Agriculture 



Dayhoff, Dale D Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Dean, H. Anne Harveyville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Dean, John R Harveyville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dean, Vernon C Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Third Row 

DeBord, Louis Centralia 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Deck, Shirley Ann Winfield 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Decker, Martin, Jr. . . Hammonton, N. J. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Deets, Max E Wellington 

Freshman in Agriculture 

DeFord, Richard L Alton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Degenhardt, Paul .... Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

DeLong, Gene E Mankato 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Demeritt, Leslie A Richland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Demott, Howard E. . . . Blue Mound 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Demous, Ollie H Pittsburg 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Denbo, Dwight E Macksville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fourth Row 

Denholm, William D., Jr. . .Tonganoxie 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Denison, Charles E St. Francis 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Denison, F. Lesley .... Coffeyville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Denman, Edwin Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

DePuy, Philip L Manhattan 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Desilet, Alvin L Aurora 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Dethloff, Carl R. . . . Natchitoches, La. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Detwiler, Loren A Athol 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Deutscher, Verlin Ellis 

Freshman in Agriculture 

DeWald, Melford D Bazine 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Dewees. La Verne E Sedgwick 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Bottom Row 

Dewey, Nancy L Onaga 

Junior in Home Economics 

Dewhirst, Iris Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dewhirst, Leonard W. . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

DeWittie, H. W Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

DeWittie, Mary E Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Deyoe, Richard I Coldwater 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Dickenson, Charles A Plevna 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Dickenson, James D Plevna 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Dickerson, Don F Augusta 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Dickerson, Richard J Augusta 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Dickey, Ruby E Ashland 

Junior in Home Economics 
















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Top Row 

Dickinson, Betty G Lucas 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Dickson, Lloyd Leonardville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Dieter, James G Longford 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Dietrick, Donald D. .... Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Diggle, Frank V Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Dilworth, Morris A. ... Joplin,Mo. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Dishman, Mona Salina 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Dishner, Patricia L Garden City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Dixon, Joseph M Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Dixon, Robert L Sterling 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Dixson, Jimmie L Atwood 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Dobson, Richard H Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Doby, Paul B Okolona, Ark. 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Dodge, Ward K Dighton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Doebele, Patricia A Hanover 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Doebele, S. E Hanover 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Doege, Alberta Tonganoxie 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Dole, Claribel Almena 

Junior in Home Economics 



Dole, Robert J Almena 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Dolecek, Mary E Russell 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Doll, Wayne F Larned 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Dolton, Joseph A Enterprise 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Third Row 

Domeny, John H Oswego 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Donahy, Ann Frankfort 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Donmyer, John E. . . . New Cambria 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Dooley, Dorothy Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Doran, Jeanette Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Douce, Wayne R Narka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dougherty, Boyce W Shawnee 

Junior in Agriculture 

Down, Jack E. . . . : . Clay Center 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Downey, Charles B Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Downie, John, Jr Topeka 

Sophomore in Enginereing and Architecture 

Downing, Don F Glasco 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bottom Row 

Downing, Doris J Bird City 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Downs, Robert F. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Doyen, Mark M Rice 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Doyen, Ray A Rice 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Doyen, Ross O Rice 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Dozier, Don A Manhattan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Draney, Edwin R Fairview 

Junior in Agriculture 

Dreese, Michael R Halstead 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Drown, James V Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

DuBois, LeRoy C Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Duby, Harold A Delphos 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



FIRE DRILL CALLS both student and building and 
repair department firemen. The College maintains 
its own fire department and equipment, including 
a few paid student firemen. 




* **. 



Top Row 
Duckers, Keith G Wetmore 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Duell, Jonathan A Ruleton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Duer, John C Smith Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dugan, Dale E Clay Center 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Dulaney, Rex O Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Duncan, Russell C Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Dunlap, Jack W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Dunlap, Robert L Liberal 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Dunn, Jack E Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Dunn, Joe Junction City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Dunne, Jack D Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Dunne, Margery L Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Duphorne, Betty I. . . . Sharon Springs 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Durflinger, Glen E Arlington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Durnil, Ardith Long Island 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dutton, Charles H Concordia 

Junior in Agriculture 

Dyck, Erma Mae Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Dyer, Alvah F Longton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Dyer, Herbert L Americus 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Eagleton, Harold W Kanopolis 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Eaton, Frank R., Jr Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Eaton, Ralph N., Jr Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Ebert, Derry B Blackwell, Okla. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Eberwein, Elroy A Lawrence 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Eckelman, David B Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Ecord, Joyce V Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Eddy, Virginia Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Eddy, William F Girard 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Edell, Casey Smith Center 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Edgar, Robert W Sterling 

Junior in Art and Sciences 

Edmonds, David W Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Edmundson, Billy J Healy 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Edwards, Marilyn L Newton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Edwards, Mary L Emporia 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Edwards, William R Emporia 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Edwards, William W. .... Atchison 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Eggerman, John W Green 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Ehret, Delbert G Atchison 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Eidson, William R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Eisenhower, Milton S., Jr. . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Elam, John C, Jr Winfield 

Junior in Agriculture 

Elder, Calvin Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Elliott, Earl S Marysville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Elliott, Marjorie M. . . Medicine Lodge 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Ellison, John R Abilene 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Elmborg, JoAnn Belleville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Elmer, Charles H Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Elvin, Leland H Marquette 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Emme, Louis D Kensington 

Junior in Agriculture 

Enders, Paul M Lyons 

Junior in Agriculture 

Endsley, Mark C Cedar 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Engelhardt, Barbara Baker . . Kingman 

Junior in Home Economics 

Engelhardt, Wayne E Kingman 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Engelken, Edgar J Seneca 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Engle, M. Jane Chapman 

Junior in Home Economics 





Top Row 

Engler, James A Chapman 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Engler, Jean Scranton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

English, Anne M Hutchinson 

Junior in Home Economics 

Erdwien, Neil C El Dorado 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Erichsen, Evelyn Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Erickson, Phil B Overland Park 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Ericson, Clifford E Clyde 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Ericson. Neil A , Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

E:nst, F. Gene Manhattan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ernst, Norman J. ... Mansfield, Mo. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Esslinger, James E Madison 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Estill, William B Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Eulert, Arnold E Holton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Evans, Marilyn A Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Evans, Norma J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Evans, Thomas M Lebo 

Junior in Agriculture 

Eversmeyer, Harold E Ottawa 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Everson, Merrill J Mankato 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Everson, Raymond L Mankato 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Ewart, Marjone L Minneapolis 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Ewing, Eugene C Riley 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Eyestone, Melvin T Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Eyestone, Sharon R Wichita 

Freshman in Home Economics 
Eyman, Kathleen Deerfield 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Fagg, Joseph R Norton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Faidley, Karl E Clay Center 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Fairbairn, Leighton E Claflin 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Faith, Bill J Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fansher, Marvin R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fansher, Stanley B Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Faris, Marjorie L Stockton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Fassett, James O Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fatzer, Elmer G Fellsburg 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Fatzer, Kenneth D Fellsburg 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fayette, Jacqueline J Meade 

Junior in Home Economics 

Fearl, Amy Lou Hutchinson 

Junior in Home Economics 

Feaster, Max E Oxford 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Feight, John J., Jr Clyde 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Feightner, Chauncy S. . Homestead Park, Pa. 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Feldner, Robert B Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Felix, Ralph E Atchison 

Freshman in Art sand Sciences 

Felzke, Walter D Leavenworth 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fennema, Owen R Winfield 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fenton, Jane S Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

SUMMER SCHOOL SWIMMERS drew a lot of water 
— or vice versa. The city pool, lighted for night 
swimming, gave the text books a stiff run for their 
money. The little man on top of the heap is 
voicing appreciation of girl life-guard. 



'■< 







Top Row 

Ferguson, Harvey N. ... Silver Lake 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Ferguson, Robert D Richmond 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Fernkopf, Kenneth M Mayetta 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fessler, Ruth R Kansas City 

Junior in Home Economics 
Fiden, William H. . . . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Fiehtner, Phyllis Jeannette . Summerfield 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Field, Ralph G Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fielding, Harold E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Finch, Wanda G Tulsa, Okla. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fine, Phyllis M Burlingame 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Finley, John L., Ill .... St. Francis 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Finley, Robert M Gardner 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Finnigin, Famie R Beattie 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Finuf, Bernard A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Finuf, Wilfrid B Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Fiser, Bobby L Mahaska 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fisher, Donald D Holton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fisher, Ross W Lawrence 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Flaherty, Michael .... Minneapolis 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Flannelly, Arthur W., Jr. . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Flannelly, James T Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Fleener, John E. . . . . . Greensburg 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 
Fleming, Jonathan B. . . . Garden City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fletcher, Albert B. . . . Junction City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Fletcher, Robert M Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Flora, Barbara J Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Flower, Robert S . . . . Junction City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Floyd, MacNelly Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Fobes, Robert D Beloit 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Foland, Jack V Almena 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Folck, Harold L Junction City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Folck, Lois G Junction City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Folkers, Jo Clearwater 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Fourth Row 

Ford, Mary Lou ..... Marysville 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Foreman, Melba D Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Forsberg, Leo A., Jr Concordia 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Fortenberry, Jacob D., Jr. . Imboden, Ark. 
Junior in V eterinary Medicine 

Foster, Hugh M Effingham 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Foster, Jane M Altamont 

Junior in Home Economics 

Foster, John T Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fox, Delia A Russell 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Fox, James L Turon 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Frakes, Glenn Corning 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Francis, Horace D., Jr Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Francis, James M St. John 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Frank, Joan L Portland, Ore. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Franklin, Edwin W Burlington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Frankum, Demrie D. ... Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Fraser, Ray W Belleville 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Frazier, John C, Jr Tulsa, Okla. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Freeby, Fred R Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Freeman, Phil R Brownell 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Frey, Muriel H Osborne 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Frey, Nancy C Douglas, Ga. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Frey, Oma L Cottonwood Falls 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 




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Top Row 

Frey, Russell A Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Frick, Edwina Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Frick, Forris B Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Friesen, Max J Lehigh 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Frisbie, Jeanne L Grantville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Frisbie, Russell M. ... Independence 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fritschen, John F Dorrance 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fritzler, Betty J Ness City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Froelich. William M. . . Arkansas City 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Froman, Marilyn D Winfield 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Frye, Martha H Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Fryer, Alan P Belleville 

Sophomore in Engineering nd Architecture 

Fryer, Kathryn R Belleville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fulcher, Richard L Larned 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fuller, John O Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fultz. Charles W. . .' . . Nortonville 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Funke Harry A Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Furlong, Virginia L. . ** . . . Wichita 
Sophomore in- Engineering and Architecture 



Furneaux, Raymond J Moran 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Gage, Ardyce E Salina 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Gamble, Charles J Granby, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gamlowski, M. Joanne .... Topeka 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Gantz, Jack D Ness City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gantz, Robert F Ness City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gard, J. Phil Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Gardner, Daniel R Hartford 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Gardner, Julia F Hartford 

Junior in Home Economics 

Garnand, Bruce F Garden City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Garrison, Harold K. . . . | Hutchinson 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Garrison, Phil M Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Garrison, Roy C Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Garver, Barbara G Kansas City 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Gast, Emil O Paola 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Gates, Loin A Aurora 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gatz, Jerry L McPherson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Gatz, John E Preston 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Gaughan, Wilbur F Centralia 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gault, Theodore G Dorrance 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gearhart, Jo Anne Erie 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gearhart, Marvin Shaw 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gebhart, R. Clark, Jr Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gee, Kathleen Kinsley 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Gehrke, Thornton .... White City 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

FUTURE K-STATERS— more than 500 of them— are 
the children of the married veteran students. Vets 
claim the children remind them of the necessity for 
study and thus more than offset any distraction 
from their school-books. 

I ' 





Top Row 

Geiger, Willard T Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Geist, Eugene F Chanute 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gentry, Harold C Asherville 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Gentry, Maurice G Asherville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

George, Louis C Longford 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

George, Ralph L Paola 

Freshman in Agriculture 
George, Raymond D. . . . Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Gerard, Richard . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Gering, Eugene Beloit 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gerlach, Mary E Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Germann, Donald J Clifton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Second Row 
Germann, Fred C Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Germann, Ralph N Clifton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Germann, Rosalie B Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Gessell, Dale S Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Getty, Alfred H Clayton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Gibbs, Shirley Barnard 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gibson, Charles E Kansas City 

Freshman in Atts and Sciences 



Gibson, Esther M Ottawa 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Gier, Lucille J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gier, Richard W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gies, Donna L Tecumseh 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Gigstad, Alfred O Effingham 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Gilbaugh, Doris F Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Gilbert, Bruce D Holton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Gilbert, Mowry C Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Gilbert, William W. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gilek, W. Ruth Anthony 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gillan, Dale E Garden City 

Junior in Agriculture 

Gillan, Lois A Garden City 

Junior in Home Economics 

Gillan, Robert F Concordia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gillenwater, Joe P Chase 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Gillespie, Howard L. . . Manchester, Okla. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fourth Row 

Gillmore, Helen M Mentor 

Junior in Home Economics 
Gilmore, James T Atchison 

Junior in Agriculture 

Gingrich, Virginia .... Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Gish, Norville R Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Glenn, Charles W Holton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Glenn, John D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Glover, Carolyn Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Godwin, R. Duane Greenleaf 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Goeken, Marjorie R Linn 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Goertzen, Albert E Milford 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Goertzen, Kenneth L. . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Goetsch, Dennis D Sabetha 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Golden, Leslie B Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering 

Goldsberry, Edward E Wellsville 

Junior in Agriculture 

Goller, George H Hanston 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Gold, Lavern F McDonald 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Good, John R McCune 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Goodbar, William L Coffeyville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Goodloe, Leonard .... Kansas City 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Gore, Lorna D Larned 

Junior in Agriculture 

Goris, Charles A Jackson, Mich. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Gorman, Joseph W Hartford 

Freshman in Agriculture 






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Top Row 

Gorman, Margaret C Hartford 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Gorman, Richard J Chapman 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Gorrell, Earl D Independence 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Gossett, A. Kathleen .... Wichita 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Gotti, Anna M Culver 

Junior in Home Economics 

Gough, Marvin L Pittsburg 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Gould, Elizabeth J Jamestown 

Junior in Home Economics 

Goyen, Lester D Cunningham 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Goyen, Loren F Cunningham 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Graff, E. June Marysville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Graham, Gerald L Neodesha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Graham, Jack Columbus 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Grandfield, James R Wichita 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Grandfield, Ora Mae . . . Manhattan 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Grandle, Robert L Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Granger, Doris L Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gransberry, James L Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Grant, Anita G. . . . Bloomfield, N. J. 

Sophomore in Home Economics 



Graves, J. Lewis . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Gray, Curtis Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Gray, Donald C. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Green, Charles Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Green, Elton E Kansas City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Green, Susie .... Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Green, Thayne C Leoti 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Green, Vera L Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Green, Warren E Leoti 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Greenawalt, Jack O Paola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Greene, Laurenz S Beverly 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Greene, Willard B Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Greenough, Phyllis A Solomon 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Gregg, Duane L Hiawatha 

Engineering and Architecture 

Grene, William B Manhattan 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Bottom Row 

Grentner, Margaret C . . Junction City 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Gress, George L. . . . Medicine Lodge 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Gretzinger, James . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Greve, Robert W Freeport 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Grieshaber, Carl E Marysville 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Griffee, Dana L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Griffing, Richard B. ... Manhattan 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Griffith, Edwin Minneola 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Griffith, Joan Kiowa 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Griffith, Mary Jo Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Griffith, William E Milford 

Junior in Agriculture 

SUMMER SCHOOL ISN'T SO BAD, especially in 

the afternoons when friends meet for a game of 

bridge and a sun tan, and occasionally, a swim in 
the city pool. 




Top Row 

Grimes, James T Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Grimes, William M Ashland 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Grimwood, Lee Sedgwick 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Grissom, Garth C Syracuse 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Grittman, W. Kenneth .... Glasco 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Groberg, D. Gail Clifton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Groff, Richard C Topeka 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Gross, Toanne G Russell 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gross, Robert U Russell 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Guerrant, Mary Jo . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Home Economics 

Gunning, Mary H Bowie, Md. 

Junior in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Gurtler, Glen B Beattie 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Gurtler, Homer G. ... Summerfield 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Gurtner, Eugene A Dodge City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Gutzman, Gerald D Almena 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Gutzman, Robert E Almena 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Gwin, Dorothy D Leoti 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Gwin, Howard D Leoti 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Haag, Donna L Holton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Haase, Herman J Plainville 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Habig, Jack F Marysville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Habr, Frank J Hanover 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Hackney, Blair H Atchison 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Haddock, Dean D Minneapolis 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hadley, Phyllis M Topeka 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Haflich, Neil O Garden City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hagan, James E La Grange, 111. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hagans, Anita F Norton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hagans, Jean E Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hagans. Robert F Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hageman, Joy Healy 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hahn, Robert E Overland Park 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Haines, Charles E Winfield 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Rov/ 

Hakanson, Harold R Isabel 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Halbower, Jane L Anthony 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Halbower, Lorraine M. ... Anthony 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Hale, Edward E Kansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hale, Patricia G Wellington 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hale, William R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Enginering and Architecture 

Hall, Charles F Fall River 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Hall, Gloria L Belleville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hall, Grace L Hutchinson 

Junior in Home Economics 

Hall, John W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hall, Laurence E Phillipsburg 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Hall, Mary E Marysville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hall, Phyllis J Belleville 

Junior in Home Economics 

Hall, Rex E Pittsburg 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hall, Robert F Merriam 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Hamasu, Masoa . . . Paouile, Hawaii 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hamilton, Barbara L. Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hamilton, Dallas E Manchester 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hamilton, Dorothy Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Hamilton, Franklin D., Jr. . Wellington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hamilton, Kenneth E. . . . Dodge City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hamilton, Robert B Madison 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 








Top Row 

Hamilton, Sidney G Neodesha 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hammarlund, Marion .... Topeka 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hammeke, Alice M. ... Great Bend 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hammond, Helen L. . . . Great Bend 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hampl, Eldon D Luray 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hampton, Peter W Abilene 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hancock, A. Lyman .... St. Francis 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Handlin, Dale L Geneseo 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Handlin, Lloyd J Geneseo 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Haney, Bob L Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hanlon, Nancy D Coffeyville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Hanna, Raymond E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hansen, Franklin A. ... Kansas City 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hansen, Joyce A Turon 

Junior in Home Economics 

Hansen, Lillian M Clay Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hansen, Norman N Greenleaf 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hansen, Reeva M Greenleaf 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Hansen, William E Turon 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Hanson, Kenneth L Jamestown 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hanson, Richard E Jamestown 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Harbert, Glen A. . . . Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Junior in V eterinary Medicine 

Harder, Alice I Minneapolis 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Harding, Betty J Cheney 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Harding, Betty L Ozawkie 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Harding, Warren G Goodland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hardy, Frances E Holyrood 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hare, Charles L Burr Oak 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hare, Jean M Viola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hare, Wendell F Delphos 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Harger, Patricia P. . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Hargis, R. Jeannette .... Highland 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Harkins, Dale D St. Francis 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Harkness, Kenneth A. ... Scott City 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Harlan, J. V Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Harman, Carolyn E. ... Chicago, 111. 
Sophomore in Home Economics 



Harman, Richard J Hoisington 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Harper, A. Jeanette . . . Hutchinson 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Harper, William E Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Harr, Joan D McPherson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Harrar, Robert K. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Harris, Clifford J., Jr. . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Harris, Dale L Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Harris, John T Coffeyville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Harris, Rilla O Kansas City 

Junior in Home Economics 

KING AND QUEEN OF PLEDGES were Paul Lyman, 
Kappa Sig, far right, and Yvonne Swenson, Alpha 
Chi. The election and crowning were held at the 
Interfraternity Pledge Council Ball in February. 

'V- 

— M 




Top Row 

Harris, Samuel R Colony 

junior in Agriculture 

Harrison, Frank C Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Harrison, George A Melvem 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Harrison, Pearl L Clifton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Harrison, Walter C Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Harrold, Leland R Sedgwick 

junior in Arts and Sciences 

Harshbarger, Frank V Topeka 

junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hart, John W Arkansas City 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Hart, Marilyn J Westmoreland 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hart, Raymond L., Jr Wetmore 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hart, Willis H Newton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Hartford, John H Buhler 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hartman. Edna A Hoxie 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Hartman, Myrna Kensington 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Hartman, Norma J Russell 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hartman, Stuart Augusta 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hartung, Kenneth L. . . Junction City 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hartwell, Richard M Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Harwood, Mary L Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hatcher, Kathryn D Plains 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hatcher, Robert Plains 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hatcher, Wayne L Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Hatesohl, Delmar E Linn 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hatfield, Charles K Kinsley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hathaway, Raymond M. . Robinson 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hauber, Edmond L Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hauserman, William J., Jr. . Ogden 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Havel, Kenneth D Cuba 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Haverkamp, Clarence F. ... Hanover 

Junior in Agriculture 

Hawes, Averil J Benton 

Junior in Home Economics 
Hawkins, Hal W. . . . Springfield, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Hawkinson, Lauranell M. . . . Bigelow 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hawley, Richard D. ... Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Fourth Row 

Hay, Willa B Eskridge 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hayden, William C. . . Tecumseh, Mich. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hayes, Donald W Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Hayes, Lewis L Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Haylett, Ward H Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Haynes, Loren D Clifton 

junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hays, Jack W Dodge City 

junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hayward, Jack W Elkhart 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hazlett, Floyd L Newton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Heaton, James F Great Bend 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hecht, Wilbert L Seneca 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Heckathorn, Clifford W. . . Augusta 

Junior in Enginereing and Architecture 
Heckert, William G. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Heckathorn, Elizabeth J. . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 
Heckler, Robert D. . Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Heckman, Henry J. . . . Independence 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Heddens, Kimber J. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hedman, Phillip A Kansas City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hedstrom, Edwin G Mankato 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hefley, Floyd D Baxter Springs 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Heikes, Duane E Riley 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Heikes, Norma K. . . ... Riley 

Freshman in Home Economics 





If jesw "*" *«» ^* ;¥-.s« A 



&£&* 1 § mmm [J^mmfm i IH : 








Top Row 

Heikes, Robert L Clay Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hein, Robert D Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Heinze, Charles D. . . . New Cambria 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Heise, Harold D Burlingame 

Junior in Agriculture 

Heise, Richard A Scranton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Held, Norman M Great Bend 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Heline, Robert E Lindsborg 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Heliums, Nancy A Wichita 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hemenway, Keith A. . . Kirkwood, Mo. 
Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Hemphill, Richard D Norton 

Sophomore in Enginereing and Architecture 

Hemphill, Robert L Madison 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Henderson, Joseph P Burden 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Henderson, Mil°s L Wheaton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hendricks, James H Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hengel, Raymond J.. . . . Pierre, S. D. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Henningson, Irene L Herndon 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Henre, Martha J Kansas City 

Junior in Home Economics 

Henrichs, Bill K Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



Henrickson, Ila M. .... Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Henry, Edwin C Dodge City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Henry, Janet E Coffeyville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Henry, Joan C Newton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Hensel, Alberta H Dodge City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Henson, Mary F Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hepler, John A Wamego 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Herr, Gordon, M Great Bend 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hertel, Robert L Great Bend 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Herwig, Robert N Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Heskett, Robert E Hoxie 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Hess, Hazen D Colby 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hess, Marvin L. . . . .... Larned 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hess, Wilbur D Larned 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hesterman, Vernon D. . . . Kensington 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Heter, Leslie N Sterling 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Heter, Thomas J Sterling 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Hewitt, George D Peoria, 111. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hiatt, John C Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hibbard, J. O Toronto 

Junior in Arts and Science 

Hickey, Robert W Liberal 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Hickok, M. Annabel Ulysses 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hicks, Jerry K Phillipsburg 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hicks, Merle E Moline 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hiefner, Bill Admire 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Higgins, Rosalie S Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

"NOW HOLD STILL," says the white-jacketed little 
man who met students at the door of the Board of 
Health trailer during the weeks in which X-rays for 
tuberculosis were taken. 




Top Row 

Hildenbrand, Arthur L. . . Clay Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hilgendorf, Rolland M. ... Lincoln 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hill, Donald M Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Hill, Donna Lou Quinter 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hill, Harriet E Westmoreland 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hill, Jeannine Topeka 

Sobhomore in Home Economics 

Hill, Jewell R Horton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hill, John H Ottawa 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Hill, Neva G Burrton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hill, Shirley J Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hillhouse, Arville B. . . . Aurora, Mo. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Hills, Dale L Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hillstrom, Wilfred B. . . . Randolph 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hilt, Billy T Wilmore 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hinds, Carolyn J Hutchinson 

Junior in Home Economics 

Hinkhouse, Betty J Hays 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Hinrichs, Bob C Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hiskett, Anna B Polo, Mo. 

Freshman in Home Economics 



Hite, Lewis A Pittsburg 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Hix, Margaret A Norcatur 

Junior in Home Economics 
Hix, Mary Lee Norcatur 

Junior in Home Economics 

Hixon, Harry A Iola 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Hodges, Jack R. . . . Lowry City, Mo. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Hodgson, Robert L Manhattan 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 
Hodler, Margaret M Beloit 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Hoel, William L Newton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hoferer, George F Wamego 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Hoff, Donald O ..... . Olathe 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hoffman, Fred H Reece 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hofmann, Jack D Manhattan 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Hofmann, Marvin D. . . . Clay Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Hofsess, Jo Harriett . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Hogan, Willard D Neodesha 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Hogg, Donald W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Hogg, Raymond E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Hoglund, Harold M Miller 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Holcombe, Barbara Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Holden, John R Independence 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Holder, R. Duane . . Independence, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Holder, Ray D. . . . Independence, Mo. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Holeman, Allen L Norton 

Junior in Agriculture 
Hollenback, James W. . . Arkansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hollinger, Max E Chapman 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Holloway, George G., Jr. . . Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Holloway, John F. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Holm, Corinne E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Holman, James G Kinsley 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Holmes, Barbara L Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Holmes, Joseph R. . . . Pasadena, Calif. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Holmes, Lemuel H Olathe 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Holmes, Richard W Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Holmes, W. Earnest, Jr Marion 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Holwick, Roy A. . . Lee's Summit, Mo. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Homier, Robert K Ellis 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Honeyman, W. Allen .... Madison 

Sophomore in Agriculture 






y^« ,\-- ^^-p [.^- * «-■ - «?} 



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f*. O ^ ) A <* 



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Top Row 

Honeywell, Jay A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Honstead, Hernden P Topeka 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Hoober, Glen L., Jr Concordia 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hoover, Neva R Smith Center 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Hopkins, Donald R. . . . Clearwater 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hopkins, Doris M Clearwater 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Hopkins, Vernice Claflin 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hoppas, Ellen L Menlo 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Hornbaker, Donald O Sylvia 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Horton, Loren M. . . . Neosho Rapids 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hoskins, Herbert D. . . . Bennington 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Hotchkiss, Robert .... Burlingame 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hottman, Calvin A Chapman 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Houghton, Clifford Tipton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Houghton, William H. . . . Concordia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Houk, Gerald Parsons 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

House, Robert A. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Housholder, Darwin L Scandia. 

Junior in Agriculture 



Howard, Shelton C Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Howe, Glenn Randolph 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Howell, Helen Ashland 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Howell, James N LaCrosse 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Third Row 

Howell, Jean M Ottawa 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Howell, Vernon C Ashland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Howenstine, Elaine M. . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Howenstine, Robert J. . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Howes, Merle L. . . Gaithersburg, Md. 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Howland, Shannon L Liberal 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Howley, Robert M Haddam 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hoyer, William E Wellington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hoyt, Carol J Caldwell 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Huber, Bernard H Meriden 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Huddleston, Norma J. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bottom Row 

aHudelson, Robert L Pomona 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

iHueben, Donald P Kansas City 

a Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Huenefeld, John C. . . . Gregory, Ark. 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hughbanks, Woodard M. . . . Crisfield 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hughes, Bruce E. . Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Hughes, Clinton D Mulberry 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Hughes, Dewey J Wellington 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hull, Phil Virgil 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hull, William A., Jr Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Humphreys, James M Sterling 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Hundley, William C, Jr. . . . Horton 

Freshman in Agriculture 



FEELING A LITTLE BLUE, the statue of William 
Harrison again saw the world through phogged 
eyes. And down Lawrence way, Uncle Jimmy 
wasn't Green any more — but a pretty purple. 




' """l »■» ^^ 



- 




- 




Top Row 

Hunt, Elizabeth J Belleville 

Junior in Home Economics 

Hunt, John E. . . . Clintonville, Wis. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hunt, Kenneth W Concordia 

Sophomore in Arts, and Sciences 

Hurd, Phillip E Nickerson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Hurd, Robert L Ashland 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Hurst, Marian Ness City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Hurst, William F Caldwell 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Hus, Janice L Stockton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Hus, Richard D Stockton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Huston, G. Dewey .... Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Hutchins, Max R Glen Elder 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Hutchison, Ira J Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ibarguen, Luis G. ... La Paz, Bolivia 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Ice, John W Cedar Point 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Iiams, Don A Kansas City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Iiams, Kenneth G Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ilsley, Carol A McPherson 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Irnel, Arleigh R Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Imel, Sara L Spearville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Imler, Marjorie E Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ingenthron, Marcia J Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Ingenthron, Thomas P Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Ireland, Robert A Mullinville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Irick, Harold W Valley Falls 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Irvine, James B Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Irwin, Donna L Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Jaber, Jalal H Nablus, Palestine 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Jackson, Arlie V Hill City 

Junior in Agriculture 

Jackson, Clarice A El Dorado 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Jackson, Donald E Kansas City 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Jacobs, Bobby D Norton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Jacobs, Clinton O Holton 

Junior in Agriculture 

Jacobs, Frank, Jr Alta Vista 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Fourth Row 

Jacobs, Joan Potwin 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Jacobs, Myra J Holton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Jacobs, Victor J Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Jacobson, Byron L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Art sand Sciences 

Jacques, Robert L Dodge City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Jaedicke, Eugene R Easton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

J agger, Sidney W Minneapolis 

Junior in Agriculture 

James, Eldon L Shields 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

James, Louis D Stockton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

James, Thomas M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Jameson, Earl F Pittsburg 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Jarrell, Earl M Ashland 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Jeffery, Gilbert C Corning 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Jenkins, Emma L Hiawatha 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Jennings, David D. . Los Angeles, Calif. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Jennings, Harry C, Jr. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Jennison, Kenneth J. . . . Rush Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Jensen, E. Don Hunter 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Jensen, E. Lew Hunter 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Jensen, Kresten R Coffeyville 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Jepsen, Richard L Castleton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Jett, Harold A .. Logan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 





J&M d 











Top Row 

Jett, Margaret A Kansas City 

Junior in Home Economics 

Jewell, Sarah P. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Jewett, Arthur L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Jewett, Frances L Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Jilka, Bernard T Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Jinkins, Mary E Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Jirik, Dale E Abilene 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

John, Robert F St. John 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Arvilla M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Bernard P Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Carl E Glasco 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Johnson, Carl W., Jr. ... Concordia 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, Dana C Republic 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, L. Dick Lawrence 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Gordon D. . . . Leonardville 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, H. Dale Salina 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Johnson, Harold M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Kenneth D Eureka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



Johnson, D. Laverne .... Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Leonard B Alta Vista 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Johnson, Lyle P Osage City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, Margaret A Assaria 

Junior in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Johnson, Martha J Macksville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Mildred E Viola 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Johnson, Nathan Herington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, Norman E. ... Jamestown 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Norman W Troy 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Johnson, Paul S Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, Phyllis Lou Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Richard E Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, Robert A Mankato 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Roger A Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Johnson, Vernell W. . . . Waco, Texas 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Johnson, Vonda M Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Johnson, Wesley E Willis 

Sophomore in Arts an dSciences 

Johnson, Wilber L Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Johnson, William D Cuba 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Johnson, W. Wayne Salina 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Johnston, Ada Mae . . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Johnston, Ira O McCune 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Johnston, Mildred I Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Johnston, William G. ... Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Johnston, William R Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Jolly, Marguerite L. . . . Oakley, Kan. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

AND THE VOICE OF THE WILDCAT is heard 
in the land during the red-hot game with the Jay- 
hawks. As one can tell by looking at the listeners 
in the Union, the boys from down the river are 
getting a pasting. 




Top Row 

Jolly, Merrill R Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Jolly, Samuel A., Jr Topeka 

Junior in Engineering 

Jones, Clarence E., Jr Reading 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Jones, Clarissa Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Jones, Edwin D Hiawatha 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Jones, Floyd I Lebo 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Jones, Howard M Aurora, Mo. 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Jones, Jack R Ottawa 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Jones, Lois E Wakefield 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Jones, Marilyn L Goodland 

Junior in Home Economics 

Jones, Paul V Everest 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Jones, Rolland A Moline 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Jones, Robert H Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Jones, Russell A Stafford 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Jones, Russell E Winfield 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Jones, Stanley E Clinton, Mo. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Jones, Thayne W Rush Center 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Jordan, James A Stafford 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Jordan, John D Freeport 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Juhlin, L. Deane Emporia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Junghans, Harley H. . . . Junction City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kaaz, Kerwin D Atchison 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Kabance, Daryl W Mayetta 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Kahl, Donna Mae .... Council Grove 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Kale, Gerald A Hiawatha 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Kamal, Adel .... Nablus, Palestine 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kamm, Harlan E Buffalo 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Karlin, Marne J Catherine 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Kaspar, Robert V Green 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kastens, Bernard H Anthony 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Kastl, Don Lee Blue Mound 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kastrup, Joanne M Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Katz, Lois R Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Katz, William W Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 
Kaucher, Karl Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Ar\:htiecture 
Kauffman, Kenneth O. ... Almena 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Kaup, Charles K Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kay, Edwin W., Jr. . . . San Jose, Calif. 

Junior in V eterinary Medicine 

Kays, David D Eureka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Keas, Roberta Effingham 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Keas, Warden F Stockton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Keast, Donald R Larned 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Keast, Glenn L Larned 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Keast, Wayne E Larned 

Junior in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 
Keck, Lee E Hiawatha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kee, Wesley R Spring Hill 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Keech, Elmer V Emporia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Keech, Lola J Emporia 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Keegan, Robert M. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Keena, Jimmie J Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Keener, Robert D Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Keeshan, Marilyn M. . . . Manhattan 

Junor in Home Economics 

Keeten, Joan M Stockton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Keeth, Allan F. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Keeton, Glenn L Carlyle 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 






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Top Row 

Keif, Rodney G Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Keigwin, Thomas H. . Bushnell, 111. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Keim, Milton L Manchester 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Keiswetter, Enid I Hill City 

Junior in Home Economics 

Keith, Dave L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Keith, Jane L Burlington 

Junior in Home Economics 

Kellenbarger, Frank M Newton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Keller, Carl G Concordia 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Keller, Harley C Beattie 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Keller, William E Greensburg 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Kelley, Herbert A Burlington 

Junior in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Kelling, Ruth D Cedar 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Kelly, Betty C Ogden 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Kelly, Paul E Holton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kelly, Robert C Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kelsey, Richard D Topeka 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kempton, Clayton L. ... Manhattan 
Special Student in Arts and Sciences 

Kempton, Donna . . Cottonwood Falls 
Junior in Home Economics 



Kempton, Jean Merriam 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Kenagy, Cecil H Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Kennedy, Karen A Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Kennedy, Kathlyn J Wilmore 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Kennedy, Ruth Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ken my, Eugene P Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Kerbs, Alice L Great Bend 

Junior in Home Economics 

Kerby, William S Chanute 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Kern, Eugene R Merriam 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kerr, Rolland D Mahaska 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Ketterman, Marjorie J. . . .Summerfield 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Kettle, J. Fred Iola 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kidd, Wallace R Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kilian, James W Junction City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kilmartin, Ronald F Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Kimbell, M. Gwyn .... Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts ami Sciences 

Kimmel, Robert G Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Kincheloe, Jack S. ... Cunningham 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kindel, James P Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

King, Allen D Oak Hill 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

King, A. R Ellis 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

King, Barbara B Winfield 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

King, Barbara Lee .... Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

King, Keith R Manhattan 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

King, Robert M Potwin 

Junior in Agriculture 

King, Roberta A Marysville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



FOOD, A RADIO AND A BULL SESSION and what 
more could you ask of a typical late afternoon. 
Women of East Stadium, converted to housing this 
year, gather in one of the spacious rooms. 




Top Row 

King, Roy A Augusta 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

King, Shirley R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kinnamon, Lynn R Sylvia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Kinsey, Barbara A Troy 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kiper, Donald S Downs 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Kirby, G. Nadine Larned 

Junior in Home Economics 

Kirgis, Robert L Beloit 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Kirkeminde, James E. . . . Alta Vista 

Junior in Agriculture 
Kirkendall, Kenneth E. . . Smith Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kirkpatrick, Robert J. . . . Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Kiser, Corliss Lee Delphos 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Kish, Roy C Rock Port, Mo. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Kissick, Delberta R Beverly 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kissick, Jacquelyn J Beverly 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kite, Henry W St. Francis 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Klaassen, Theodore . . . Whitewater 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Klameth, Leo C Vesper 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Klema, Margaret R Wilson 

Sophomore in Home Economics 



Kleopfer, Donald D Hope 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kline, Charles E Tribune 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Kloeffler, Gale D Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kloxin, Archie D Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Knapp, Alphia E Gridley 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Knapp, Dolores M Gridley 

Junior in Home Economics 

Knapp, William H Burlington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Knappenberger, Francis J. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Knight, Harold R Melvern 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Knight, Jo Anne .... Bonner Springs 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Knight, Robert H Anthony 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Knight, William E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Knoche, Delores D Stafford 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Knouse, William W Horton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Knowles, Arthur W Kirwin 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Fourth Row 

Knowles, Bernard W Salina 

Junior in Agriculture 
Knowlton, Richard L Oxford 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Knox, Bennita M Spearville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Koch, Mary J Sharon Springs 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Kohlrus, Peter Ellis 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Kohn, John H Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Kolterman, Delbert W. . . Havensville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Komisar, Aaron . . . New York, N. Y. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Konecny, John F Viola 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Konold, Richard D Pratt 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Koon, Norma R Clearwater 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Bottom Row 

Kordes, Howard D Olathe 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Korneman, Virginia L Wamego 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kors, Kermit K Independence 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Kortman, Dwight A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Koslow, Martin .... Brooklyn, N. Y 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Kraemer, Barbara E. . . . Blue Rapids 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Kraemer, Donna M Frankfort 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kraemer, Vincent H Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kramer, Marvin K Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Kramer, Raymond C Seneca 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kramer, Rudolph H Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 




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Top Row 

Kraner, Lois J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Krause, Harold L Kismet 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Krehbiel, B°tty J McPherson 

Junior in Home Economics 

Kreutzer. Helen A Easton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Krey, Max A Zenith 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Krizman, Richard J Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Krug, LaVada A La Crosse 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Kruse, Calvin D Scott City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kruse, Rex M Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Kruse, Wilber F Selden 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Kubicke, Gene J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Kubik, Ralph E Caldwell 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Kubik, Richard S Caldwell 

Junior in Agriculture 

Kuckelman, Paul J Baileyville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Kueny, Leola J Oskaloosa 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Kugler, Laberta R Abilene 

Junior in Home Economics 

Kuhlman, Henry W., Jr Linn 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Kuhn, Cleo H Alta Vista 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Kuhn, Robert P Salina 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Kysar, Robert E Tribune 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Lacey, John W Hoxie 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lacey, Ruth L Greeley 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Third Row 

Lachman, Richard C ■ . Cuba 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lachman, Roger D Cuba 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

LaCroix, Paul M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lacy, Lillian L Onaga 

Junior in Home Economics 

Lacy, Merle E Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lagasse, Margaret J Ames 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Lagergren, Charles A Elsmore 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lagergren, Frederick E. ... Mankato 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lair, Virgil A Piqua 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lamb, John H Ottawa 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lamb, Maurice E Galena 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Bottom Row 

Lambert, Addie M Hiawatha 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lambert, Joseph E Clyde 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Lambert, Lucille M Newton 

Junior in Home Economics 

Lamborn, Nancy R. . . . Leavenworth 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Lambright, Donald P. . . Savannah, Mo. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lampe, Alvin L Hanover 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lampton, Walter D Mulberry 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Landau, Darrell W Oberlin 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Landau, Marjorie E Oberlin 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lander, Wayne E Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Landreth, Jack E "Wellington 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



FEROCIOUS WILDCAT, the "living mascot" was 
one of the chief attractions at K-State football 
games. Identity of the acrobatic cat was — and is — 
a closely guarded secret. 




Top Row 

Langer, Herbert R Bronx, N. Y. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Langer, Melba M Great Bend 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Langhofer, Billy G Plains 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Langston, Arel L Smith Center 

Junior in Engineering and Architecure 

Langton, Allan L Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lanier, Irvin D Douglass 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lanning, Edgar R Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Lanoue, Eli A Aurora 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lanoue, Wanda Knight . . . Wellington 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Lansden, John W Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Larberg, G. Robert Mission 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Larrick, Marilyn A Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Larsen, Florence F Burns 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Larsen, Royce R Belleville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Larson, Kathryn M Abilene 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Larson, Lewis H Galva 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Larson, M. Thaine Athol 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lasnier, Donald R Concordia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Lassen, Buster B Wichita 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Latimer, Margaret A. . . . Borger, Texas 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Laugh inghouse, Lyal M. . . . Ft. Riley 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Laughlin, Patricia J. . . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Laughlin, William N Goodland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Law, J. Leland Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Lawrence, Donald L. . . . Overland Park 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lawrence, George W Luray 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Lawrence, Wayne A Nashville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lawson, Belva J Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lawson, Roger A Sylvan Grove 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lawyer, Marion D Easton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Lay, Betty Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Lay, Jack E Gypsum 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lay bourn, Ross L Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Fourth Row 

Lea, Shirley J Liberal 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lederer, Loyal L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
LeDuc, Ronald E Concordia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Lee, Peggy Pratt 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Lehman, Bernice L Enterprise 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Lehmann, Emil H., Jr Oakley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Leighton, Hope I Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Lemon Jr., Carl A. ... Tulsa, Okla. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lemon, Raymond L Parker 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lenhart, Laverna R Abilene 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Lenkner, Lucille M Coats 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Bottom Row 

Leonard, Floyd J Sublette 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Leonard, Mary A Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Leonard, Patrick G Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

LeRoy, Stanford L . . New York, N. Y. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lesser, Martin Junction City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Levell, Frank W Atchison 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Levering, Wilbur E LeRoy 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lewis, Anne L Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Lewis, Barbara L Preston 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Lewis, Charles C Kansas City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Lewis, Eugene R Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 




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Top Row 

Lewis, Frank R Wichita 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lewis, James J Preston 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lewis, Joseph H Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Lewis, A. Lloyd Emporia 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lewis, Robert F Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lewis, Robert G Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering atid Architecture 

Lewis, William H., Jr St. John 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lichty, Garland H Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Liebl, Elvyn A Spearville 

Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 

Lind, Wendell E Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lindblom, Richard M Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Lindgren, Lawrence E Dwight 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lindgren, Stanley R Dwight 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lindholm, E. Claribel .... Cheney 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Lindholm, Howard B Cheney 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lindholm, John C Cheney 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lindholm, Leonard E Cheney 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lindquist, Raymond L. . . . Waterville 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Lindsey, Claude D., Jr Oswego 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lingafelter, Max E Augusta 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Link, Donald F Chase 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Link, Glendeen N Phillipsburg 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Linn, Dorothy M Abilene 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Linscheid, Ronald L. . . . Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Linville, Thomas W Eskridge 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Lips. Walter R Clay Center 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Livers, David L., Jr Waterville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Livingston, Joy E Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Lloyd, Harold L Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Loader, Weldon L Talmage 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Logan, John A . . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Logan, Mae M Clay Center 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Londeen, Allen A Chapman 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Loney, Marge L. . . . Cottonwood Falls 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Long, Dorothy Abilene 

Junior in Home Economics 



Long, Robert D Clyde 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Long, Sue Ann . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Long, Wayne W McCune 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Look, Donald H Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Loomis, Marjorie J Valley Falls 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Lorson, Mary J Chapman 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Lothman, Theodore L Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Love, Donald E Partridge 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Love, Guyla E Wichita 

Sophomore in Home Economics 



NOT DRILLING FOR OIL, but putting up the 
Frankenstein machine that served as Homecoming 
decorations for the fraternity are Kappa Sig pledges. 




Top Row 

Lovell, Susan L Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lovendahl, Warren D Clyde 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lovett, Gene D Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lowe, Russell L Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Lowell, Katherine A Concordia 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Loyd, Don O Powhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Lubroth, Irwin A. . . . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Lucas, George W Frankfort 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Lukens, Harold C Clearwater 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Lundgren, Paul Osage City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lundquist, Marvin C. • • , ■ McPherson 

Sopuhomore in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Lungren, Herbert A Corbin 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Luthi, Jaunita M Wakefield 

Junior in Home Economics 

Luthi, Wilma R Madison 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Lygrisse. Darlene O Fredonia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lyman, Paul L Burrton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Lyness, Anita M Troy 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Lyon, Charles W Parsons 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Lyon, John J Grenola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McBride, Frank J Clay Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

McBride, John W Axtell 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McCall, Sybil L Osage City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

McCallum, Dean . . . Matfield Green 
Freshman in Agriculture 

McCarthy, Daniel F Larned 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McCarty, Lawrence E Merriam 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

McCauley, Gordon Stockton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

McCauley, Warren D Stockton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McCausland, Jim Wichita 

Junior in Agriculture 

McCaustland, Robert E Bucklin 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

McCay, Jerome H Wilmore 

Junior in Agriculture 

McClean, Dan L Clay Center 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

McClintock, John W Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McClure, Philip Chase 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

McClure, Robert S . Chase 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

McClure, William Herbert . . Republic 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

McCoid, Barbara A Rossville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 



McCormack, Robert K. ... Winfield 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

McCormick, Elton G Cedar 

Junior in Agriculture 

McCoy, James E Overland Park 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McCoy, James L Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McCoy, Mary M Wellington 

Freshman in Home Economics 
McCoy, Nancy J. ... Overland Park 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

McCracken, Donald D. . . . Ellsworth 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McCune, Duane A Manchester 

Junior in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

McCune, Howard E Minneola 

Freshman in Agriculture 
McCurdv, Ralph G. . . W. Orange, N. J. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McDaniel, Maurice L. . . . Faucett, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McDaniel, William S Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McDill, Glenys Sterling 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

McDonald, Philip T Horton 

Junior in Agriculture 

McDonald, Richard 0. . . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

McDowell, Norma Kipp 

Junior in Home Economics 

McEachern, Billie N. . . . Wellington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

McFadden, Harold L Stafford 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

McGhee, Charles R Centralia 

Sophomore in Agriculture 





Top Row 

McGill, Edward E Canton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McGill, John F Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McGinness, Constance . . . Cherryvale 
Junior in Home Economics 

McGinness, Edward W Aulne 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

McGlothlin, Howard R. . . Junction City 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

McGrath, Harry B Beloit 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

McGrew, Elsie E Allen 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Mcllvain, Mary Clay Center 

Junior in Home Economics 

McKee, Robert A Topeka 

Ereshman in Engineering and Architecture 

McKee, Walter D Manter 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

McKeen, John Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Second Row 

McKim, Ivan Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McKitterick, James A. . Lee's Summit, Mo. 
Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

McLaughlin, Harry J. ... Manhattan 
Junior in Agriculture 

McLean, Katherine .... Wakeeney 
Ereshman in Home Economics 

McLeland, James R Hiawatha 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

McLeland, Robert W Hiawatha 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



McMahon, Charlene M Beattie 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

McMillen, Ann Minneapolis 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

McMinn, Terry Wichita 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

McNaughton, Edward . . Kansas City 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McNay, Carroll E Louisville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

McNeil, Edgar Effingham 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

McNeil, Halcyon Manhattan 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

McNeil. Ralph V Miltonvale 

Ereshman in Engineering and Architecture 

McNeill. Monita D Topeka 

Ereshman in Home Economics 

McNeill, William N Syracuse 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

McNicholas, Jo Ellen Pratt 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

McReynolds. Kenneth L. . . . Natoma 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

McVeigh, Amos H. ... Kansas City 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

McWilson, Roger C Concordia 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Maas, Joseph R Alta Vista 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

MacCaskill, Mary V Wichita 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

MacCreary. Frank L., Jr. . . Arkansas City 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Mace, Claron L Garnett 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



MacGregor, Margaret A. . . Kansas City 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mack, Willis M Lenexa 

Ereshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Mackintosh, David O. . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Maddox, Byron C, Jr. Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Maddox, Wendell L Hazelton 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

Maddux, Howard A Lakin 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

Madison, Brenton H. . . . Minneapolis 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Magers, Malcolm B.. Jr Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Magard. Henry F. . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

A THRILL-A-MINUTE! That's the Van Zile Open 
House. In reality, one of the most enjoyable ways to 
spend a pleasant, informal evening. Though the 
picture doesn't back us up — there are women at 
Van Zile. 




Top Row 

Magnus, Alverda Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Magnus, Bedford A Clyde 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Magnus, Norma M Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Mahoney, Kenneth J Dorrance 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Mahoney, William J, Jr. . Buffalo, N.Y. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Main, Max G Caldwell 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mallory, Bonnie D Brewster 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Malone, Betty J Ellinwood 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Malone, Wiliam E. . . . Hudson, N. Y. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Maloney, Joseph E. . . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Manges, Harry L Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Manion, George W., Jr. . . . Goodland 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Manis, Al Coffeyville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Manke, Charles W Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Mannell, Leon H Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Manos, Sammy G Lyons 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Marak, Eldon J Horton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

March, Arthur B Kansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



March, Patricia D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Mariani, Robert A Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Markley, Lewis C Wellington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Marmon, Fayette F. ... Garden City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Marnix, Melville J., Jr. . . Arkansas City 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Marrs, Roy R Harveyville 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Marshall, Deems E Eureka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Marshall, Kenneth R. ... Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Marshall, Paul M., Jr. . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Marteney, Edward W Hazelton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Martens, Paul F Towanda 

Junior in Agriculture 

Martin, Loren H Corbin 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Martin, Nancy L Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Martin, Nannette S Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Martin, Phyllis Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Martin, Richard D Glasco 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Martin, Sally Wichita 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Martin, Victor H Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Maskill, Oliver F. . . . Westmoreland 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Mason, John L Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Mason, Robert H Belle Plaine 

Junior in Agriculture 

Massey, Ralph N Sun City 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Masters, Orpha G Anthony 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Mastin, Loren E Abilene 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mather, Edward L Norton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Mathews, Robert E Paola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 
Mathews, Ulysses G Manhattan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Mathis, Helen Smith Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mathy, Harold E Morrowville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Matlack, Don Burrton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Matson, Jack W Belmont 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Matthew, Dick Concordia 

Junior in Agriculture 
Matthews, Kermit D. . . Granada, Colo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Matti, Marvin L. . . Cottonwood Falls 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Mattson, David Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Mattson, Jo Ann Coffeyville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Maupin, Ardeth N. . . . Winnetka, 111. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 










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Top Row 

Maxwell, Ruthetta .... Kansas City 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

May, Hobart I., Jr Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mayall, Elizabeth A Wichita 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Mayall, Marion A Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Mead, Richard L Sterling 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Meade, Norma J Palco 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Mealey, Robert B Iola 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Means, Harold F., Jr. . . . Garden City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Means, Thomas C Kinsley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Meenen, Donald W. . . . Clay Center 
Freshman in Agriculture 

Mees, Tersa J Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 



Second Row 

Mehl, Reine .... Mixcoac, Mexico 
Freshmain in Engineering and Architecture 

Meinen, Stanley R Ruleton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Melgren, Willis H Osage City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Mellenbruch, Mary . . . . . Topeka 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Mellor, Stanley R Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mellott, John P Edwardsville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Melroy, David J Norton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Merrill, Catherine A Ellis 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Merrill, Fred L. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Merriman, Richard H. . . . Marysville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Mertz, Harold D Manhattan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Third Row 

Mettler, Steward D Formoso 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Metz, Harold L St. John 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Metzinger, Walter F. New Orleans, La. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Meyer, John W., Jr Chapman 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Meyer, Mary K Chapman 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Meyer, Richard C Powhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Meyer. Robert H Independence 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Meyers, Dale M Dwight 

Sophomore in Enginering and Architecture 

Meyers, EdmunJ L Marysville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Meyers, Verla L Woodston 

Junior in Home Economics 

Michael, William \V Havana 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Middleton, Irvin E., Jr. . Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Middleton, Nancy G. . . Clarksville, Mo. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Mierau, William C Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Millard, Raymond P., Jr Lyons 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Miller, Barbara A. . . . Lansdowne, Pa. 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Miller, Barbara Howell .... Ottawa 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Miller, Charles H Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Miller, Clyde E Liberal 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Miller, Dean T Agra 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Miller, Duane D Ellsworth 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



SATURDAY AFTERNOON SHOPPING SPREE in 
comfortable shirrs and jeans is interrupted for a 
coke and a smoke at an Aggieville drug store. 




Burlingame 



Top Row 

Millei, Harold L Peck 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Miller, Harris M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Miller, Martha E Dodge City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Miller, Milton B Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Miller, Robert D Ellsworth 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Miller, Ross E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Miller, Vesta H Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 
Mills, James M. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mills, Kenneth H Neodesha 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mills, Marilyn Topeka 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Mills, Willa D Leavenworth 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Milner, Harold L Belleville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Minor, Vernon F Leoti 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Miracle, John R Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Misegades, Dean E. . . Livingston, N. J. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Mitchell, Barbara A. . . . Cawker City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Mitchell, Dean H Republic 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Mitchell, Harold C Belleville 

Junior in Agriculture 



Mitchell, Harold E. . . . Greenfield, 111. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mitchell, John O Eureka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Mitchell, Margery A Spearville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Mitchell, Marjorie A. . . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Mitchell, Nick W Muncie 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mitchelson, Billy L. . . . Baxter Springs 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Moate, Frances L Smith Center 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Moats, M. Jane Nickerson 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Mock, Bruce D Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Moehlman, Eva R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Moehring, Don C, II .... Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Moeller, Calvin E Hiawatha 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Moffatt, Eugene M., Jr. . College Point, N.Y. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Mohn, Paul O Tampa 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Mohr, Wayne A Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Fourth Row 

Moll, Patricia L Wamego 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Moll, Ralph W Wamego 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Molzen, Dayton F Newton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Money, John W Chicago, 111. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Montague, David M Anthony 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Montague, Deloris J Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Montague, Mary H Anthony 

Sophomore in Arts and Science 

Montgomery, Clara L. . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Moody, Edward C Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Moody, Jack E Kansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Moody, Robert E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 
Moomaw, Marilyn M Dighton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Moore, Charles H Atchison 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Moore, Edwin R Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Moore, Marilyn A Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Moore, Mary J Oswego 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Moore, Richard V. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Moore, Theirl W Andover 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Moore, Thelma L Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Moore, Wesley C Robinson 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Moorman, John L. . . . Smith Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Moors, George W McPherson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 





Top Row 

Moots, Frank K Newton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Moran, John J., Jr Claflin 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Moran, Kyle L Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Morehouse, Lawrence G. . . Manchester 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Morgan, Albert W Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Morgan, Carl E Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Morgan, Edward B Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Morgan, Eleanor J Eureka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Morgan, Lois M. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Morgan, Ruby J Russell 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Morgan, William H. ... Hutchinson 
Sophomore in Engineering and Arcihtecture 

Second Row 

Morris, Lyle F Hugoton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Morrish, Cynthia . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Morrison, Gail R Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Morrison, Iolene Stafford 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Morrison, Joel G . . . Council Grove 
Freshman in Agriculture 

Morrison, John W Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Morrison, Kenneth S Abilene 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Morrow, Gene Russell 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Morse, Elliott M . Luray 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Morse, Richard H Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mortimer, Norman E. . . . Great Bend 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Morton, Helen J Green 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Morton, Melvina E Wamego 

Junior in Home Economics 



Muckenthaler, Leona M Paxico 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mudge, Carol E Gridley 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Mueller, Laureen M Hugoton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Mugler, Marilyn J Clay Center 

Junior in Home Economics 

Muirhead, Robert L. . . Shreveport, La. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Mulhern, Caroline S. . . . Summerfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mulhern, Lawrence U. . . Summerfield 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mulkey, Everett E Phillipsburg 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Mumaw, Dean T Holton 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Moser, Robert S Hiawatha Munger, Glenn O Manhattan 



Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Mosier, Betty W Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Mosier, Frank A Hoxie 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Moss. Jack G McCook, Nebr. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Moss, Robert L Independence 

Jnuior in Arts and Sciences 

Mossman, Richard S Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Motin, James A. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Motter, Eugene F Gaylord 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Mountain, Betty L Minneapolis 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Muckenthaler, George J Paxico 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Sophomore in Agriculture 

TREATING THEMSELVES and their housemother to 
a Sunday breakfast at a local hotel, are the occu- 
pants of a girl's organized independent house. 




Top Row 

Munger, Nancy J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Murphy, Donald G Woodston 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Murphy, Frances R Colony 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Murphy, John R Hiawatha 

Junior in Engineering and Architcture 

Murphy, Michael F Great Bend 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Murray, Edward F., Jr. Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Musil, Charles L Blue Rapids 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Mussett, James R., Jr Fredonia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Musson, Forrest D. . . . Arkansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Mustard, Elizabeth Abilene 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Myer, Kenneth L Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Myers, Herbert A Americus 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Myers, Michael R Marysville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Myers, Norma L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Nabours, Richard D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Nakashima, Jason T. . . Paauilo, Hawaii 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Nanninga, Gloria Ann . . Leonardville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Nanninga, Ralph E. . . . Leonardville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Nash, Roy L Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Naslund, Ralph E Leonardville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Nault, Dwaine Clyde 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Navarre, Sara Ann . . . Independence 

Junior in Home Economics 

Third Row 

Navinskey, Theresa Easton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Neal, Jean R Topeka 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Neal, Joan Salina 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Neal, William Hoisington 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Near, Charles R Long Island 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Nease, Edward B. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Nebergall, Marguerite D. . . . Newton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Need ham, Mary Beth .... Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Neeley, Mary Lou El Dorado 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Neely, Marjorie F Earleton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Neely, Nancy Omaha, Nebr. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Neely, Thomas G Minneapolis 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Neff, Ann E Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 
Neff, Harold O Ulysses 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Neher, Harold A McCune 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Neher, Raymond E McCune 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Nehring, Lola Mae Wamego 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Neibarger, Janice .... Tonganoxie 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Neighbor, Charles H Iola 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Neil, Richard W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Neises, Marv Louise . . . Belle Plaine 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Nelson, Albert L Ruleton 

Sophomore in Agrciulture 

Bottom Row 

Nelson, Allan F Chanute 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nelson, Carroll L Clifton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nelson, Dallas L Clay Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Nelson, George G Smolan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Nelson, George W Kansas City 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Nelson, Gordon V Merriam 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Nelson, Harold R Marquette 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Nelson, Joline P Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Nelson, Kenneth E Marquette 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nelson, Lee E Burns 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Nelson, Mary Alice . . . Blue Rapids 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

r^' If 

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Top Row 

Nelson, Mary A Humboldt 

Junior in Home Economics 

Nelson, Oliver F Rose Hill 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nelson, Patricia M Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Nelson, Paul D Blue Rapids 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Neugent, Roger J Lyons 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Neumann, James W., Jr. . . . Fredonia 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

New, Lowell D Ottawa 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Newacheck, Richard L ... El Dorado 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Newcomb, Richard F Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Newcomer, Joan C El Dorado 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Newell, Beth K Stafford 

Junior in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Newell, Jackie M Phillipsburg 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Newkirk, Ralph L Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Newlin, James R Hillsboro 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Newman, Ralph E Cherokee 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Newton, Bob H Turon 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Newton, Talma B Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Nichols, David E Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Nichols, Elmer C Little River 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Nichols, Patty J McPherson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Nichols, Richard D Ottawa 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Nichols, Shirley Lou Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Nicholson, William G. . . . McPherson 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Nickerson, Donald K Bushton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Niemeier, Adolph N Bremen 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Niernberger, Charles G. . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Nighswonger, Floyd E Viola 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Nighswonger, Lester L. . . . Clearwater 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nightingale, Carlyle B. ... Halstead 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nikl, James W Colby 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Noble, Mary M Rosalia 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Nolder, Betty Joan .... Manhattan 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Noll, Harry E Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Noone, R. James .... Denver, Colo. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Nordstrom, Pauline .... Randolph 
Sophomore in Home Economics 



Nordyke, Max E Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Norton, James F Glasco 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Norton, Robert D Kalvesta 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Norton, Virginia Dibbens Garden City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Noynaert, Paul J Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Nunn, Dean L Neodesha 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Nutter, Murlin J Peabody 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Nyhoff, Vernon D Cawker City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Ober, R. Nelson Beloit 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



MARCHING TOWARD DEFEAT were these loyal 
K-Staters who staged a pep rally before the K. U. 
game at Lawrence. 




Top Row 

Oberhelman, Corrin . . . Silver Lake 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Oberhelman, Dean L. . . . Waterville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Oberhelman, Robert H. . . Oak Park, 111. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Obley, Willard L Saffordville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

O'Donnell, Dorothy J. . . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

O'Donnell, Max F Gay Center 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Oelke, Harlan J Hoxie 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

O'Grady, M. Patricia . . . Dodge City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Oldfield, Ilavere B Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Oldham, Bilie L Hutchinson 

Junior in Home Economics 
Oliphant, Marcus W Offerle 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Olsen, Dale N Kinsley 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Olsen, Vernon Everest 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Olson, Charles L Newton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sicences 

Olson, Clyde H Lindsborg 

Freshman in Arts cind Sciences 

Olson, Harold L Marysville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Olson, Mary J Lindsborg 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Olson, Robert C Newton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Olson, Virginia L Glasco 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Oltjen, Twila M Robinson 

Freshman in Home Economics 

O'Neal, Betty M Colby 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

O'Neal, George A Colby 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 
O'Neal, Durl W. . . Independence, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Opitz, Donald W. . . Ozone Park, N. Y. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Orr, Calvin C Neodesha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Orr, E. Joanne El Dorado 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Orr, Terrell A Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Orsborn, Harmon L Wamego 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Ortman, Max E Mankato 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Orton, James A Sedan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Osborn, Edgar L Frankfort 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Osmer, William A Wamego 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Ostlund, Karl H Clyde 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Fourth Row 

Oswald, John C Hutchinson 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Oswald, Roy L Iola 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Otto, Louis K Manhattan 

Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 



Otwell, Harriette E Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Overley, Frank L Belle Plaine 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Overley, Laura B Belle Plaine 

Junior in Home Economics 

Pace, Talton E Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Page, Charles L Olathe 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Page, Esther M Silver Lake 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Paige, Orville L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Paisley, Gerald J Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Palmer, Donald L. ..... Liberal 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Palmer, Louise N Jewell 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Palmer, Robert M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Paluch, Albert R. . . Monticello, N. Y. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Pannkuk, Barbara G Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Paradee, Daniel Columbus 

Sophomore in V eterinary Medicine 

Paramore, Dorothy J Topeka 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Parizo, Robert S Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences • 

Parken, Dwight W Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Parker, Richard L Manhattan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Parker, William C Mulvane 

Freshman in Agriculture 




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Top Row 

Parks, John V Pomona 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Parks, Lenoel E Pomona 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Parks, Ralph D Admire 

Junior in Agriculture 

Parr, Rolland D Rossville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Parr, Virginia J Rossville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Parrish, Leslie C Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Parsons, Clyde C Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Paschal, Wilma J Luray 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Paschal, Willis A Luray 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Pascoe, Wendell E Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Patrick, Gerald H. . . San Diego, Calif . 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Patrick, Leslie R., Jr. ... Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Patten, Russell C Oxford 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Patterson, David R Leon 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Patterson, Jean J Kansas City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Pattinson, James D. ... Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Patton, Byron L Chase 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Paul, Ellen L Ottawa 

Freshman in Home Economics 



Paul, George L Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Paul, Theodore L Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Paulsen, Dale J Zenith 

Frsehman in Engineering and Architecture 

Paustian, Donald L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Payeur, Dick H Clyde 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Payne, Arlene Augusta 

Junior in Home Economics 

Payne, Charles T Augusta 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Payne, Edith I Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Payne, Margaret A McDonald 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Payne, Richard A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pearson, Winfield J Buhler 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Peck, Jean E Matfield Green 

Junior in Home Economics 

Peck, Judith A Arkansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Peck, Manford E. Ill Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Peck, Nina M Haviland 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Bottom Row 

Peckham, Betty O Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Pekeris, Arthur M. . . . Princeton, N. J. 

Special Student in Agriculture 



Pellett, Walter E Ft. Scott 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Pence, Ernest A Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Pence, Royce O, Jr Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Pence, Shirley Manhattan 

Junior in. Arts and Sciences 

Pendergast, Wayne F. ... Frankfort 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pendleton, Jack G Coffeyville 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Penka, Jerry E Hoisington 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Pepoon, Donald W Deerfield 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Periale, Joseph F Belmar, N. J. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



STUDENTS JAM KEDZIE late in the spring to get 
their copies of the 1947 Royal Purple, which, in- 
cidentally, won the twelfth consecutive Ail-American 
honor award. 




. .Mm 



Top Row 

Perine, Jack D Wamego 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Perkins, Elizabeth T Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Perkins, Morris R Sycamore 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Peterson, Axel A White City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Peterson, Charles N Lindsborg 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Peterson, Evelyn M. ... Kansas City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Peterson, Frank A., Jr. . . . Jamestown 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Peterson, Kenneth Vesper 

Junior in Agriculture 

Peterson, Lowell N Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Peterson, Mona M Wichita 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Peterson, Sallie Kansas City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Petrie, Benjamin R., Jr. . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Petro, Richard T Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Peycke, Frank E Alta Vista 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Pfenninger, Wilbur W Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pfister, Wayne E Powhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Phelps, Harry B., Jr Ransom 

Junior in Agriculture 
Phillips, Blaine B Ottawa 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Phillips, Carroll L Concordia 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Phillips, Dan E Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Phillips, Darrell C Wakeeney 

Junior in V eterinary Medicine 
Phillips, Esther Norton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Third Row 
Phillips, Margaret R Erie 

Freshman in Home Economics 
Phillips, Maryellen .... Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Phillips, William K Olathe 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Pickering, Kathleen K. . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Pierce, B. Arlene Marion 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Pierce, Frederick J Marysville 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Pierce, George D Topeka 

Junior in Agriculture 

Pierce, B. Ilene Marion 

Junior in Home Economics 

Pierce, Robert L Chapman 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Piersee, Avis P Wells 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Pieschl, Vincent J Minneapolis 

Junior in Agriculture 

Fourth Row 

Pilcher, Claude R Delphos 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Pilcher, Donald M Delphos 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Pilcher, Ronald M Delphos 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



Pinkston, Virginia A. . . . Cedar Point 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pinon, Walter E Florence 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Piper, Warren R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Pishny, Margie L Irving 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Pittaway, Alan R Kansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Pixley, Josephine Cimarron 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Plagge, Donald L Belle Plaine 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Platner, Evelyn A. . Downers Grove, 111. 

Sophomore iyi Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Plegge, Ernest H Marysville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Ploger, Donald K Kinsley 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Plumb, Charles W Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Pohlman, Jack R Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Pohlman, Joe C Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Poland, Willis D Barnes 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Pollock, C. Wendell Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pollom, Bob M Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Pollom, Majol L Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Poison, Lloyd D Vermillion 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Ponte, Alfred G Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 









Top Row 

Poole, Nita J Webber 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Popkins, Dean W Girard 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Porter, Gene W Council Grove 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Porter, William F Pratt 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Porterfield, Burt R Holton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Porterfield, Wilma I. . . . Circleville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Potter, Clarence D., Jr Hoxie 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Potter, Don H Frankfort 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Potter, Floyd E Haviland 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Potter, Helen L Hoxie 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Potter, Sherman E Haviland 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Pottorff, Patricia J Wichita 

Junior in Home Economics 

Potucek, Charles W., Jr. . . South Haven 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Potwin, Arlan G Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Powell, William B Concordia 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Powers, Charles A Kincaid 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Powers, Richard D Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Prather, Achsah M Oakley 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Prather, Rollin W Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pratt, George F Hoxie 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Pratt, Jean Pampa, Tex. 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Pratt, Joyce Pampa, Tex. 

Sophomore in Home Economics 



Third Row 

Predmore, William D. . . . Concordia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Prentice, Edward T Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pressgrove, Betty Lou . . . Tecumseh 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Pressnall, C. Dean Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Pretz, James E Olathe 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Price, Ben, Jr Reading 

Junior in Agriculture 

Price, Charles A Paola 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Price, Clifford H Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Price, Vernon R Caldwell 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Pricer, Kenneth P Bogue 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Prickett, David E AltaVista 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Bottom Row 

Prochaska, Dean M Wamego 

Junior in Agriculture 

Prohaska, Shirley J Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Ptacek, Ernest, Jr Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Quakenbush, Donald F. ... Sublette 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Quant, Robert D Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Quantic, Myron W Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Quinlan, Robert V . . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Radenberg, Marvin H Claflin 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rader, Ramona C Piedmont 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Ragsdale, George T, Jr. ... Topeka 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rahn, Iris M Arkansas City 

Junior in Home Economics 



ROYAL PURPLE DISTRIBUTION draws a modest 
crowd. They only want to see the other fellow's 
picture. Standing in line wasn't really a hardship. 
It was Dandelion Day, and everyone not in line 
was digging weeds. Sure. 




Top Row 

Raines, Nina M Olathe 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Ralston, A. Eileen Lincoln 

Junior in Agriculture 
Ramsay, Max I. . . . . . . Johnson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Ramsbottom, Hal . ... . Munden 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Ramsdale, Richard L. . . . . Anness 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Ramsey, Harold A. .... Uniontown 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Ramsey, Richard Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ranck, Jack M. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Randolph, Leon G McPherson 

Junior in Agriculture 

Rankin, Marion C Ashland 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Rankin, Stewart R Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Ratts, Frank A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Ratts, Robert V Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Rauch, John W Miltonvale 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ray, Donald E Clyde 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Ray, Harold A Iola 

Junior in Agriculture 

Ray, Howard E Iola 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Ray, Janet Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Ray, Merrill D Delavan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Ray, Patricia J Mulvane 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Ray, Russell H Delavan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Rea, Glenn B. . . . Garden City, S. D. 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Third Row 

Rea, Robert A Topeka 

Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 

Ream, Donald G Lebanon 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ream, Leo W Ulysses 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Reardon, James E Colby 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Reber, Ralph E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Redmond, Robert J Wichita 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Reece, Dwight E Horton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Reed, Bonnie J Manhattan 

, Freshman in Home Economics 

Reed, Genevieve Stark 

Freshman in Flome Economics 

Reed, Kersey H Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Reed, Leslie N., Jr Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Reed, Robert M Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Reed, Ronald G Galesburg 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Reeder, Alys L Stockton 

Freshman in Home Economics 



Rees, Lorraine E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Reese, Charles L White Cloud 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Reese, Dean E White Cloud 

Junior in Agriculture 

Reese, John W Hiawatha 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Regan, Mary K Coffeyville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Reh, Carter K Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Reichert, Elmer W. . . . Freeburg, 111. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Reichert, William J. . . . Belleville, 111. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Reid, Billie D Garden City 

Junior in Agriculture 
Reinhardt, Donald M. . . . Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Reinhardt, Margaret G. . . Great Bend 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Reinhart, Oliver D Centralia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Reisner, Mildred E. . . Glendale, Calif. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Reinkins, Carl L Talmage 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Reiss, Gerald O Kismet 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Reist, Ruth S Seneca 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Reist, Wilfred G Seneca 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Relihan, David D Lebanon 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Remmele, Paul F Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 










Top Row 

Rentier, J. R Bucklin 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Renner, Wanda L Bucklin 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rensch, Donaleigh Lyons 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rethorst, Robert O Spearville 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Rewerts, Charles N Leoti 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rewerts, Thomas H Leoti 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Rexroad, Jay M Salina 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Rexroad, Warren W Fowler 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Rexroad, Jordon J Downs 

Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 

Reynolds, Alfonso .... Kansas City 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Reynolds, Alvera F Paola 

Junior in Home Economics 



Second Row 

Reynolds, John S Dodge City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Reynolds, LeRoy W Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Reynolds, Robert M Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Reynolds, William A Paola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Rezac, Marjorie G Onaga 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Reznicek, Paul G Lost Springs 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Rice, LeRoy C Alma 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Rice, Robert F Alma 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rice, Walter L., Jr Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rice, Warren G Greensburg 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Rich, Betty J Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Third Row 

Rich, William B. . . Lee's Summit, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Richards, Bill A Russell 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Richards, Ruth M Howard 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Richardson, Warren E Douglas 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Richter, Wayne L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Ricklefs, Margaret C Salina 

Junior in Agriculture 

Rieb, Sidney L St. Francis 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Riederer, Robert H Holton 

Junior in Agriculture 

Riegel, Don A Great Bend 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Rigel, Elmer E Riley 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Rigler, William R Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Bottom Row 

Riley, Loren D Holton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Riley, Mary A Fredonia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Riley, Weldon J Spring Hill 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rinkel, Howard G Howe, Ind 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Rishel, Robert E Goddard 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ritterhouse, Fayne L Sterling 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rix, Howard C Independence 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Roach, Bernard F Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Roach, Jeanne M Oak Park, 111. 

Junior in Home Economics 

Roach, Mary E Jewell 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Roach, Thomas G, Jr. . . . Manhattan 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



OOPS!— WRONG DOOR. Chief blessing of the 
Splinterville bathroom facilities is that not every 
body has an eight o'clock class. The youth in the 
back, incidentally, is not bald. He told us so. 




Top Row 

Robb, Jimmie L Dodge City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Robbins, Robert W Hoisington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Robert, LaVerne M Osage City 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Roberts, John R., Jr Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Roberts, Thomas C Halstead 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Robertson, Merlyn D Oberlin 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Robinett, James W. ... Phillipsburg 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Robinson, Edwin S Harlan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Robinson, Farrell R. . . . South Haven 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Robinson, George A. . . Moundville, Mo. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Robinson, Kathryn M. . . Denver, Colo. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Robinson, Lucy Ann Mission 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Robson, Robert W Abilene 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Roby, Richard E Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rockers, Donald J Richmond 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Rockers, Leonard G Greeley 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Rodick, Raymond E. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Roepke, Donald E Barnes 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Roepke, Marjorie Anne . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Roesener, Arlie K McDonald 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Rogers, Donald L Burlingame 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rogers, George J. . . . Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Rogers, Ira, Jr Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rogers, Jacquelin Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Rogers, Jane Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Rogers, John E Cedar Bluffs 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Rogers, Robert R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rokey, Ned W Sabetha 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Rondeau, Henri E Great Bend 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Root, Vearl L Centralia 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Rosacker, William Keith . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Rosania, Gustavo L. . . Colon, Panama 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Rose, Ray W Kismet 

Sopohomer in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Rosenbaum, Harold S. . . Bronx, N. Y. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architectur 
Ross, Donald R Leavenworth 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architectur 
Ross, G. Hal Ottawa 

Junior in Agriculture 



Ross, Norma J Almena 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rossiter, William H . . Cleveland, Ohio 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Rostocil, A. Jean Stockton 

Junior in Home Economics 

Roth, Barbara I McPherson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Roth, Elmer L Burlington 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Roth, Jack W Clay Center 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Rothfelder, Alvin R Axtell 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Rothweiler, Jerry S. Bison 

_. Sophomore in Arts and Sicences 

Bottom Row 

Roush, Edwes Y Garden City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Roush, Gale S Garden City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Rowland, Arlyn F Marysville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rubick, Beverly B Norton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Ruddick, Bernard N. . . Council Grove 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Rudy, Keith E Holton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Rugan, N. Jean Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ruggels, Frank L Natoma 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ruggels, Paul E Natoma 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

,Ruhaak, James E Plainville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Rule, Frances E Clayton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 









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Top flow 

Russ, Oliver G Corning 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Russel, Margaret R Canton 

Junior in Home Economics 

Russell, Dan B Mission 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Russell, F. Anne Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Russell, Frances I Concordia 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Russell, John A. ... Kenmore, N. Y. 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Russell, Lyle V Hoxie 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ryan, J. Danny Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sachen, Albert J Kansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Sage, Mary M Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Sage, Stephen S Council Grove 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Second Row 

Sageser, Floyd E Amelia, Nebr. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Salberg, Delmar R Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Salero, Deloris L Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Salisbury, Gail A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Salisbury, Ralph W Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Salyer, Thomas D Ashland 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Sampson, Charles T. . . . Kansas City 
Sophomore in Agriculture 



Sampson, Jack S Abilene 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sampson, Raymond L Severy 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Sanders, Elisha P Labette 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sanders, Wayne K Tribune 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Third Row 

Sanderson, Arden W. . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sands, Robert N Newton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Santoro, William M. 

Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 
Junior in V eterinary Medicine 

Sarver, Lois Hays 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Savage, Jack D. . Thayer 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Sawin, Dean M Washington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Scanlan, Glen W Chapman 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Schaaf, Herbert M Topeka 

Junior in Agriculture 

Schattenburg, Gerard M. . Humansville, Mo. 
Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Schendel, William C . . . Homewood 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schenk, William C, Jr. . . Kansas City 
Freshman in Agriculture 



Bottom Row 
Scherer, John E McPherson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Schilling, William K. ... Hiawatha 
Freshman in Agriculture 



Schimmels, Ross A Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schindelar, Joseph F. ... Manhattan 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schirer, Marshall E Newton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schirmer, Duane E Holton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Schjerven, Sigrid L . . . Junction City 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schlagel, Mary Olathe 

Junior in Home Economics 

Schmalzried, Raymond L. . . . Dighton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schmidt, Lyle E Axtell 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Schmidt, Robert L Abilene 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



THE PEOPLE'S IDOL, Clarence Brannum, tells the 
welcoming crowd "it was team-work that did it" 
amid frenzied cheers. The champion team members 
had another distinction — they were the most bashful 
and modest crew in years. 











*.<H 





Top Row 

Schmitz, Natalie H Ottawa 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Schmitz, Richard D. . . . Overland Park 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schneiker, Jacob C. . . Janesville, Wis. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Schnittker, John A Nashville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Scholl, Georgia R Glen Elder 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Scholz, Earl W Wichita 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Scholz, Mary Esther Wichita 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Schoof, Donald D. . . . Council Grove 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Schoof, James E Council Grove 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schooler, David L., Jr. . Bronxville, N. Y. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schoonover, Herbert C Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Schoonover. Nancy Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Schovee, William J Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Schowalter, Duane E Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schowengerdt, Dean L Reserve 

Junior in Agriculture 

Schreiber, Marjorie A Ransom 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schreiber, Ralph W Ransom 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Schridde, Calvin C Great Bend 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Schrum, Jack H Leonardville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schrum, Neil E Clay Center 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Schuh, James V. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Schultejans, Wilbert A. . . . Marysville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Schultz, Ernest G Salina 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schultz, Robert E Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schultz, Ruth H Coffeyville 

Junior in Home Economics 

Schultz, William H Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schumacher, Clifford L Lyons 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Schumann, Arthur E Detroit 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Schwab, Frederick E Madison 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schwab, Merle E Morganville 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Schwartz, Marcellus B. . . Cunningham 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Schwartz, Paul F Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schwarz, Leland R Home 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Schwarz, Lynn Lebanon 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Schweder, Carl L Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Schweiger, Rudolph J Arma 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Schwensen, Mert H. . . . Clay Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Schwilling, Marvin D Bazaar 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Schwindaman, Dale F. ... Marysville 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Scoggan, Lowell R Beloit 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Scott, Ada L Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Scott, Donald R Goodland 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Scott, Don W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Scott, Elma J Kinsley 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Scott, Emmett L Prairie View 

Junior in Agriculture 
Scott, Kenneth W. ..... . Garfield 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Scott, Loran E Westmoreland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Scott, Shirley M Garden City 

Junior in Home Economics 

Scott, Warren H Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Scribante, Adrian J Osage City 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Scully, Paul E Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Seal, Jack L Wellington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Seaman, Marian R Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sears, Elnora J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Seaton, E. Margaret .... Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 




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Top Row 

Seaton, Garrett J Chapman 

Junior in Agriculture 

Sedgwick, Virginia R. . . Bonner Springs 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Sedlacek, Marian Marysville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Seidler, Migdonio Panama 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Seifert, Robert P Pretty Prairie 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Seiler, Neva J Halstead 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Selby, Bruce O Bushton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Selby, Maytha L Bushton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Selfridge, Dorothy A. . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Home Economics 

Selfridge, Virgil K Liberal 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sellers, Kenneth W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Second Row 

Sells, Georganna .... Kansas City 
Junior in Home Economics 

Semon, Jack D Chanute 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Servis, Barbara J Hays 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Sestric, Michael D., Jr. . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Setter, Donald E Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Settle, Russell C Junction City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Severance, Robert J., Jr Beloit 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Severns, Virgil D Norton 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Shadid, Samil Ali . . Talkram, Palestine 
Junior in Agriculture 

Shaffer, Robert L Kinsley 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Shannon, Howard P. . . . Munday, Tex. 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Shannon, James L Sedan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Sharp, Horace, Jr Herington 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sharpe, Buford D Clyde 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Sharpe, Darrell K Clyde 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Shaw, Edward B Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Shaw, Iris A Sherman City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Shaw, Marjory A Waterville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Shaw, Robert E Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Shaw, Warren L Sherman 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Sheahon, Lester M Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sheats, Donald L. ... Chatham, N. J. 
Freshman in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Sheehan, John J Pittsburg 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sheets, Richard R Topeka 

Junior in Agriculture 

Shelley, James M Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Shelor, Laura L Bloom 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Shelton, Edgar D Gypsum 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Shenkel, Roger W Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Shepler, Robert G Newton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Sheppard, William L. . . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Sherer, John H Mullinville 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Sheriff, Albert H, Jr. . . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sherlock, Charles E St. Francis 

So-bhomore in Arts and Sciences 



A HOWLING CROWD estimated at more than 
3,000 students turned out in the wee hours of the 
morning to welcome the basketball heros returning 
from an East Coast jaunt. More than one fender 
suffered in the eight-car-wide procession on Poyntz. 




Top Row 

Sherman, George O., Jr. . Kansas City, Mo. 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Sherrod, James H Goodland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Shipley, Dorothy A Ransom 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Shipman, William R Olathe 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Shirky, Max L Richmond, Mo. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Shockey, Laurence H Kincaid 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Shortle, James W Elwood 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Shrake, Virginia L Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Shriver, James E Salina 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Shriver, Lester J Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Shull, Ernest E Ogallah 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Shumaker, Rose M Alma 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Sidorowicz, Norbert J. . . Buffalo, N. Y. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Sidwell, Richard S Lyons 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Siefkin, Robert M Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Siegele, Merle R Prinaton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Silva, Juanita Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Silva, Louis A Madison 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Simcox, Flavel L Kansas City 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Simmons, Donald E. ... Hutchinson 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Simon, Elmer H. . . Hermann, Missouri 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Simonton, Calvin I Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Simonton, Wendell A. . . . Aha Vista 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Simpson, William E Everest 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Sims, Mildred L Oakley 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Sink, John R Esbon 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sinkovic, Paul Arma 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Sinn, JoAnn Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sizemore, June M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Sjo, John B Salina 

Junior in Agriculture 

Sjogren, Ralph W Marquette 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Skaggs, Marian H Pratt 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Skahan, Thomas, Jr Columbus 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Skalla, Harold M Blue Rapids 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Skelton, Bernita C Nickerson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Skelton, Kenneth J Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 




Skelton, Robert G Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Skinner, Donna J Fairview 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Skinner, Dorothy M Fairview 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Slattery, Michael F Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sleder, Harry E Niles 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Slief, Forrest A Pratt 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Slifer, Lois M Florence 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Sloan, Donald R Mullinville 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Sloan, Eloise A Colby 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Slyhoff, Kent G St. Francis 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Smart, Alfred W Gypsum 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smies, William E Courtland 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Smiley, Neill R Liberal 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Calvin F Wilmore 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Celia S Burlington 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Charles L Kinsley 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Charles N. . . . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Clyde N Wauneta 

Junior in Agriculture 

Smith, Cole Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

i ®9 9 of/©* <d . 

_ <^y i 











Top Row 

Smith, Dale L Sedan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Smith, David L Wakefield 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Ellen M Lyons 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Eugene L Lyons 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Forrest L Wilmore 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Smith, Fred D Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, George L Miltonvale 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Smith, Howard D Paola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Harold L Sedan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Smith, Hubert W Great Bend 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Jean E Lyons 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Smith, Louis M Warren, Pa. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Marilyn J Sterling 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Smith, Marvin E Hoyt 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Smith, Mary H Kansas City 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Smith, Max A Westmoreland 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Nadine Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Ray W Wauneta 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Smith, Raymond A Stockton 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Raymond S Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Richard G Jennings 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Robert N Wakefield 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Third Row 

Smith, Shirley A Whitewater 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Shirley W McPherson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Thomas E., Jr. . . . Yates Center 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Smith, Walter E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smith, Wanda L Parsons 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Smith, William D Wichita 

Junior in Agriculture 

Smoll, Owen C Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Smoot, David K Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Snail, Charles L Leavenworth 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Snider, Lyle D Talmage 

Junior in Agriculture 

Snyder, Harold W Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Bottom Row 

Snyder, Marvin K Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Snyder, Robert D Robinson 

Freshman in Agriculture 



Snyder, Robert L. M. . . . Manhattan 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Snyder, Wanda L Moscow 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Socolofsky, Dorothy L. . . . Manhattan 
Junior in Home Economics 

Soelter, Robert R Wamego 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Sondergard, Walter W. . . . Ramona 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Soper, Nanette . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Sorrick, Floyd D., Jr. . . . Blue Rapids 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Spangler, Clifford E. . . . Garden City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Spare, Richard E Reserve 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



PROUD FATHERS OF TEAM MEMBERS lined the 
bench in the annual Parent's Day game. Many of 
the fathers were football stars themselves in K-State 
games a few years past. 




Top Row 

Sparks, Howard L Macksville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Spearman, Jesse Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Spears, Helen L Rossville 

freshman in Home Economics 

Specht, Henry C Piqua 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Speer, Edward W Clearwater 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Speer, Robert N Viola 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Spencer, Edward D. ... Lost Springs 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Spencer, James F Humboldt 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Spencer, Paul L Mulberry 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 

Spencer, William B. . . . Windsor, Mo. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Spiers, Virgil L Oakley 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Spitze, Don C Kinsley 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Springer, William R Seneca 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Sprinkel, Carol I Wichita 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Stadel, Thelma L Riley 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Stafford, Donald R Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Stallsworth, Mary L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stalter, James L Burdick 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 



Stamback, Donald H Sedgwick 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stambaugh, Francis E Trousdale 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stangle, Donald J Holyrood 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stangle, Everett C Holyrood 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Stanley, John M Topeka 

Junior in Agriculture 

Stansbury, Roy E Neodesha 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Stanton, Elliott M Manter 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Stanton, Harold S Plains 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Stanton, Joan Manter 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Stanton, Raymond N Burr Oak 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Stark, Edward I Salina 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stark, Robert E Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Starkey, George H Syracuse 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Starkey, Margaret A Syracuse 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Steele, Bobbie A Conway 

Junior in Agriculture 

Fourth Row 

Steele, Oliver P., Ill ... Washington 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Steeples, Duane L Zurich 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Steeples, Hillon D Zurich 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Steeples, Joanne Hill City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Stehley, Donald R Phillipsburg 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stein, Carolyn M Gypsum 

Freshman in Home Economics 
Steinbacher, Raymond H. . . . Garnett 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Steincamp, Charles W. . . . Great Bend 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Steiner, Ruth G Lebanon 

Junior in Home Economics 
Steinhaff, Rosetta M. . . Council Grove 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Steinkirchner, Arthur E. ... Newton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Steinkirchner, Kenneth K . . . Newton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Stenzel, Samuel Wakeeney 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stephan, Bonnie B Concordia 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Stephens, Verne E Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sterling, Robert E Hardtner 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Sterns, John S Hiawatha 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sterns, Ruth C Hiawatha 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stevens, William D Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Stevenson, Charles R. ... Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Stewart, Gawain R Eskridge 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Stewart, Harold A Greensburg 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 





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Top Row 



Stewart, John R Wellington 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Stewart, LaVonna L Enterprise 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Stienstra, Betsy . . . Olivos, Argentina 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

Stigall, Edward L Osborne 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stiles, Shirley S Overland Park 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stiles, Vance Spring Hill 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

Stinebaugh, Elizabeth J. . . . Princeton 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

Stinson, Ronald D Viola 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 

Stock, Douglas M. . . . Hillsdale, Mich. 

Junior in Agriculture 

Stockebrand, Marilee F. . . Yates Center 
Junior in Home Economics 

Stockebrand, Norma J. . . . Fort Scott 

Junior in Home Economics 



Second Row 

Stockman, Dick T Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Stockton, Forrest H. . Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stockwell, Gretchen A. . . Leonardville 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Stockwell, Sara S Randolph 

Ereshman in Ho?ne Economics 

Stodder, George H Wichita 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

Stoecker, Bernita V Oakley 

Junior in Home Economics 

Stohr, John W Iola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Stoltenberg, Robert G. ... 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

Stoltenberg, Robert L. ... Hiawatha 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stone, Howard M Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stone, Rex Manhattan 

Ereshman in Arts and Sciences 



Third Row 

Stoner, Clifton J Concordia 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stoppel, Vada A Dorrance 

Ereshman in Home Economics 

Stork, Gertrude A McFarland 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stoskopy, Doris J Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Stous, Thelma A Holton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Stover, Dorothy J Robinson 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Stover, Kenneth W Fredonia 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

St. Pierre, Keith D Ames 

Ereshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Straight, Leigh Eureka 

Ereshman in Home Economics 

Stratham, Kitty J Seneca 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Stratton, Gwendolyn L. ... Augusta 
Junior in Home Economics 



Bottom Row 

Stratton, Lewis D Washington 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



Streeter, Robert J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Streiff, Dean E Plains 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Streit, Carol A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Strieker, Andrew G. . . . St. Louis, Mo. 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Strickland, David H. O. . Independence, Mo. 
Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Strickler, Lowell D Hutchinson 

Junior in Agriculture 

Strickler, Robert E Iola 

Ereshman in Agriculture 

Stricklin, Helen L Agenda 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Strohm, James A Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Strohm, Patricia J. . . . Gypsum, Colo. 
Ereshman in Home Economics 



STIFF COMPETITION in the Interfraternity Sing. 
Borrowed tuxedos take an annual beating in this 
late spring event. The Beta's won the men's trophy 
this year, with the Kappa's placing first for women. 




Top Row 

Strohm, Paul J Chanute 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Strosnider, Glenn .... Havenville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stroup, Jo Ann Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Strouts, Lawrence R Wilsey 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Strowig, Louis D Salina 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Stuart, William R Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Stueder, Elmer W Claflin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Stuewe, Lois I Alma 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Sturdevant, William M. ... Altoona 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Suiter, Kenneth M Otis 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Sullens, James L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Summers, Curtis D Sedan 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Sundberg, Paul L Lindsborg 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Sundgren, Laurel Lindsborg 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Sunquist, Virgil Hutchinson 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Suther, Edith P Frankfort 

Sophomore in Home Economics 
Sutter, L. Elaine ....... Paxico 

Junior in Home Economics 
Sutter, Max D . . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Veterinary Medicine 



Sutton, Earl R Leoti 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Sutton, William H. . . Cromwell, Okla. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Swan, Marion E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Swan, Paul R., Jr Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Swan, Robert B., Jr Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Swanson, Deane W Elsmore 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Swanson, Howard C Lindsborg 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Swarner, Suzanne .... Overland Park 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Swartz, Jocelyn B Salina 

Junior in Home Economics 

Swartz, Max L Soldier 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Swearingen, William R. ... Ashland 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Sweeney, Paul H Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Agriculture 
Swenson, Eugene D. ... Morganville 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Swenson, Mary Ann . . . Morganville 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Swenson, Yvonne M. . . . Leonardville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Swezey, Donna Jean .... Wakefield 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Swiercinsky, Paula L Republic 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Swift, Warren G. . . . Ft. Smith, Ark. 
Junior in Veterinary Medicine 



Switzer, James R. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Szatalowicz, Marion T Alma 

Freshman in V eterinary Medicine 

Taddicken, Helen I Marysville 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Taff, Shirley Kansas City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Takushi, Takeo .... Honolulu, T. H. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Tarrant, Curtis E Bucklin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Tarver, Donald Q. . . . Memphis, Tenn. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Tate, Frederick J. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Tate, Laverne .... Westfield, N. J. 

Junior in Home Economics 

Taylor, Bonnie Dee .... Manhattan 

Sophomore hi Arts and Sciences 

Taylor, Charles Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Taylor, Ellen J Chapman 

Junior in Home Economics 

Taylor, Everett J Enterprise 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Taylor, Frank B., Jr Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Taylor, James W. ... . . Oakley 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Taylor, Jim Seattle, Wash. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Taylor, Leonard J Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Taylor, Paul D Topeka 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Tempero, Gordon E. ... Clay Center 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 





Top Row 

Templeton, Richard A. . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

TenEyck, George R Walton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Terrill, Wallace N Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Tesche, Richard E Lenexa 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Thacher, Frank E Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Thackrey, E. Ann . . Silver Spring, Md. 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Thackrey, Ruthe P Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Thackrey, Ted O Pratt 

]unior in Arts and Sciences 

Thatcher, John E. . . . Chatham, N.J. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Theobald, Lavonne A. . . Yates Center 
Junior in Home Economics 

Thiessen, Marjorie A Beloit 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Thogmartin, William F. . . . Fort Scott 

Sophomore in V eterinary Medicine 

Thomas, Don E Dighton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Thomas, Jane L Wichita 

Junior in Home Economics 

Thomas, Marion T Dighton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Thomas, Milton N. . . Medicine Lodge 

Junior in Agriculture 

Thomas, Vern A Salina 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Thompson, Joan Dodge City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Thompson, Paul D Howard 

Junior in Agriculture 



Thompson, Ray L Minneapolis 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Thompson, Raymond A. . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Thompson, Robert D. . . . Great Bend 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Thompson, Willa J Haviland 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Thomson, Charles S Emporia 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Thorn, Ernest B Topeka 

Sophomore in Engnieering and Architecture 

Thorn, Robert B Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Thornborrow, William A. . . Wetmore 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Thornton, C Joseph .... Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Thornwall, Joseph C Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Thowe, Harry M Alma 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Thuma, Mary Lou .... El Dorado 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Thuma, Richard L El Dorado 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Tiemann, Olivia M Lincoln 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Tierney, Pat O Coffeyville 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Tiffany, Floyd E Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Tilgner, Adolph R Gypsum 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Tilley, Victor M Frankfort 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Timm, Herbert M Chapman 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Tindal, Harold H Osborne 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Tinkler, Arlene T Dallas, Texas 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Tobias, Billie M Liberal 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Toburen, Warren D Manhattan 

Junior in Engnieering and Architecture 

Todd, Helen Atchison 

Junior in Home Economics 

Tognascioli, Herschel . . Junction City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

WAITING TO GET IN NICHOLS CRACKERBOX 
to see the champion Wildcats trounce another 
opponent. At some games, the line was three 
blocks long and impatient but determined fans 
stood for five hours. 

t*j fl»11Mli 'Jjijg 

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Top Row 

Tognoscioli, Joe H. . . . Junction City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Tolson, Dorothy .... Overland Park 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Tomlins, James B Wellington 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Tomlinson, Elaine M. . . . Smith Center 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Tooley, Max H Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Toothaker, Melva G Wilmore 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Torkelson, Delbert W Horton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Torkelson, Donald E. ... Manhattan 

Sophomore in Veterinary Medicine 

Torkelson, Virginia I Horton 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Torres, Federico P. . . Esteli, Nicaragua 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Totten, Mary E Beattie 

Junior in Home Economics 

Second Row 

Tow, John W Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Townsend, Charley E. . . Lebanon, Nebr. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Tracy, Dale H Udall 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Traulsen, Herbert A Tescott 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Trayer, Danny D. . . Cottonwood Falls 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Triska, Anthony F Hanover 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Trost, Ruth I Concordia 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

J 





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• -■ 




Tubach, Freda Glasco 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Tucker, Mason D Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Tucker, Richard E Minneola 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Tucker, Virgil M Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Turnbull, Dale W Eskridge 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Turner, John Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Turner, Leland E Mound City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Turner, Robert L Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Turner, Wayne E Cheney 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Turner, William T Cheney 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Turnquist, Ralph O Lindsborg 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Tutt, Maiy Lou Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Tuttle, Gloria Tribune 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Twiss, Page Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Uhl, Connie M Coldwater 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Ukele, Clifford H. . . . Sharon Springs 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Ulrich, Robert S Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Ulricksen, Ann Mission 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 



Umbehr, Keen, Jr Alma 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ummel, Donald K Arnold 

Juinor in Agriculture 

Ummel, Maureen M. . . Medicine Lodge 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Ungles, Lloyd K Satanta 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Unruh, Leonard .... Pretty Prairie 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Unruh, Milruth Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Unruh, Willis Moundridge 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Uppendahl, Donald L Leoti 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Upson, Dan .... . Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Utermoehlen, Ralph E. ... Pittsburg 

Junior in Agriculture 

Utt, Glenn S Neodesha 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 
Uyeda, George T. . . Honolulu, Hawaii 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Van Amburg, Harold L. . . Washington 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Van Buskirk, Esther B Liberal 

Junior in Home Economics 

VanCleave, Harold B Galesburg 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

VanDoren, Max E Deerfield 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

VanDorn, Norma L. ... Kansas City 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Vandruff, Maurice E Furley 

Junior in Agriculture 
VanGilder, Shirley A. . . . Osawatomie 
Sophomore in Home Economics 





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Top /?ow 

VanGundy, Myron L Emporia 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Vanhaverbeke, David F. ... Eureka 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Vanier, Jerry D Salina 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Vanier, John K Salina 

Freshman in Agriculture 

VanPelt, V. Ray Beloit 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Van Vliet, Phyllis Holton 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Varakian, Aram . . . Union City, N. J. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Vargon, Edward Kansas City 

]unior in Arts and Sciences 

Vasey, Patricia Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Vaughan, Charles N Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Vaughan, Willie H Grenola 

Junior in Agriculture 

Second Row 

Vaughn, James N Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Veal, J. D Decatur, Tex. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Velasquez, Harold Anthony 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Venburg, Gerald D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Venburg, Keith E Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Venburg, Kenneth W. . . . Manhattan 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Venburg, Lloyd C Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Vest, Barbara Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Vestring, Jim W Burns 

Junior in Agriculture 

Vincent, Richard M Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Vogt, Jean Vee Moundridge 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Vohs, Donald R Kansas City 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Volkel, Charles F Lenora 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Volkel, Lloyd V Lenora 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Vollbracht, Ralph L Newton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Vondracek, William W. . . . Hazelton 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Voran, Carolyn E Augusta 

Junior in Home Economics 

Vycital, Jim W Alamota 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Waddell, Jack L Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Waggoner, Carol R. ... Kansas City 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Wagner, John H Rozel 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wagner, Leland D Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Walden, Kenneth E. . . . Kansas City 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Walker, Charles E. ... Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 



Walker, Kenneth E Augusta 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Walker, Roy H Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Walker, Russell D Mankato 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Walker, Wanice A Overbrook 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Walker, Wayne J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Walklet, John R. . . . Glenridge, N. J. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Waller, Leo J Seneca 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Wain, Marlys A Canton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Walsten, Vada Y Hutchinson 

Junior in Home Economics 

JUSS! BJORLING, tenor brought to the College by 
the Manhattan Artist Series, holds a confab with 
his accompanist just before concert-time. 




Top Row 

Walter, Terry L Tribune 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 
Walters, Jan McDonald . . Great Bend 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Walters, Lloyd H., Jr. . . . Great Bend 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Walters, Matthew L Atchison 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Walters, Robert W Manhattan 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Walthall, Clyde E Coffeyville 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Ward, David D Eureka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ward, Eugene R. . . Los Angeles, Calif . 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Ward, Jean Ann Protection 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Ward, Robert L Centralia 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Ward, Virgil L Oberlin 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Warne, Robert J Mankato 

Fresh mm in Arts and Sciences 

Warner, Lela M Arlington 

Junior in Agriculture 

Warner, Maurice L Holcomb 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Warnick, Patricia S. . . . Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Warren, Betty C Garnett 

Junior in Home Economics 

Warren, Robert O Garnett 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Warren, Walter P Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Warren, Wilma J Garnett 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Washburn, James R Newton 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Waters, Ernest N St. John 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Watkins, James R Ottawa 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Third Row 

Watkins, Mary K Kiowa 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Watson, Bill D Turon 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Watson, Clarence F. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Watson,Edward D Peck 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Watson, Robert P. . . Independence, Mo. 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Watson, Trevor Quincy, 111. 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Waudby, Everett J., Jr Russell 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Waugh, Alpha M Weskan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Waylan, Clyde M Delavan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wayman, Perry L Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wear, Jacqueline Kinsley 

Junior in Home Economics 

Fourth Row 

Wear, Maurice Halstead 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Weatherbie, Robert R Iola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Weathers, Molly J Salina 

Freshman in Home Economics 



Weaver, Mae K Burlington 

Junior in Home Economics 

Weaver, Mary Frances . . . Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Weaver, Roland S Beattie 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Weaver, Velma M Larned 

Junior in Home Economics 

Weaver, William R Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Weaverling, Robert M Mankato 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Webb, Dee L Alton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Weber, Veronica M. . . . Cunningham 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Weddle, Nada C Lindsborg 

Freshman in Home Economics 
Weekly, Herbert S Topeka 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Weekly, Willis B Topeka 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wehling, Charles H Hanover 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 
Weidenbach, Richard O. . . McPherson 

Freshman in Agriculture 
Weidman, Dale E Clearwater 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Weis, Joe Palo Alto, Calif. 

Junior in V eterinary Medicine 

Weiser, Richard E Oberlin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Weissbeck, Helen O Topeka 

Junior in Home Economics 

Weixelman, Donna F. . . . Manhattan 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Welch, Gene K Lyons 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



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Top Row 

Welch, Hal R Topeka 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Welch, John F Vermillion 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wells, Cecil G Tulsa, Okla. 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Wells, Dorothy E Elmdale 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wells, Maxine Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Wells, Norma J Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wells, Robert R Elmdale 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Weltsch, Carroll J Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wempe, Donald L Sabetha 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wempe, Louis A Marysville 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Wendele, Durward R Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Wendland, George F. . . . Manhattan 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wendland, Lucille .... Manhattan 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

Wendland, Mary E Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Wentworth, Edward H Hays 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wentworth, Patricia Russell 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Werhan, Charles E. ... Bennington 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wesley, James L Hutchinson 

junior in Arts and Sciences 



West, Jay A Nekoma 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

West, Kenneth B Garden City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Westfall, Martha L Kingman 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Westvold, Richard S Wichita 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Third Row 

Westvold, Robert G Wichita 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Westvold, Ruth A Wichita 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Weyand, Loren W Lehigh 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Weyrich, Bonnie L Kinsley 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Weyrich, Wayne D Kinsley 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Weyrich, Wilma Kinsley 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Wharton, John J Lenora 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wheatley, Phyllis J Gypsum 

Junior in Home Economics 

Whelpley, Robert E Coldwater 

Freshman in Agriculture 

White, Bruce M Wichita 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

White, Chris C Peru 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

White, Harrison D Manhattan 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

White, James A Lakin 

Sophomore in Agriculture 



White, James R. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

White, Norma Ruth .... Hill City 
Sophomore in Home Economics 

White, Patricia R Wellington 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Whitehair, Leo A Abilene 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Whitehair, Rodney A Abilene 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Whiteneck, William H Olathe 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Whiteside, Edward H. ... Neodesha 

Sophomore in Agriculture 
Whitmore, Erma L Potwin 

Sophomore in Home Economics 



IN A HAPPY MOOD— as who wasn't?— smiling 
Bill Christian handled the public address system at 
all home basketball games. Only thing Bill couldn't 
do was coax a good rendition of the Alma Mater 
from the crowd. 




Top Row 

Whitney, Charles M. . . . Phillipsburg 

Junior in Agriculture 
Whitney, Kenyon P. . . Libertyville, 111. 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Whitney, Mary E. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Whitney, Walter Warren . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Whyte, Hartzell J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wible, Vernon W Chanute 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wiens, Loren E Lyons 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wiesendanger, James H Salina 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Wieser, Pauline M Kingman 

Frehsman in Home Economics 

Wiggans, Galen C Chanute 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wightman, Wayne L Sylvia 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Wilcox, Clayton E Bennington 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wilcox, E. Anne .... Minneapolis 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wilcox, Jimmie C Garden City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wilcox, Peggy Concordia 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wilcox, Robert N Manhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wilder, Stuart F Leavenworth 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wildman, James E Kansas City 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Wiley, Doris Marie Wichita 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wiley, Harold A Sedgwick 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wiley, Parker D Wichita 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wilhelm, Gerald D Clay Center 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Third Row 

Wilhelms, Newell M. L. . Hebron, Nebr. 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wilk, John C Clearwater 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wilk, Roger E Clearwater 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wilkerson, Doris E Syracuse 

Frehsman in Arts and Sciences 

Wilkie, Helen M Abilene 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wilkinson, Patricia M Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Willard, Jane L Topeka 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Willard, Robert C. . . Kansas City, Mo. 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Willard, Thomas K Eskridge 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Williams, Bernard A Genesco 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Williams, Bernard M. ... Powhattan 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Fourth Row 

Williams, Betty L Dodge City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Williams, Ervin Cleburne 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Williams, Harold L Topeka 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



Williams, Ira M. . . . Houstonia, Mo. 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Williams, James E., Jr. . . . Kansas City 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Williams, Lafe R Bendena 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Williams, Robert C. . . . Overland Park 

Junior in Agriculture 
Williams, Robert H. . . St. Paul, Minn. 

Junior in Veterinary Medicine 

Williams, Thelma G. . . . Junction City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Williams, Wendell H Fredonia 

Juniors in Arts and Sciences 

Williams, William L. ... Burlington 

Junior in Agriculture 

Bottom Row 

Williamson, Barbara J Topeka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Willibey, Dean F Newton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Willis, Richard E Parsons 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Willis, Shirley J Parsons 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Willis, Walter G Sterling 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Willoughby, Roscoe R, II . . . Olathe 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Alton J Kansas City 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Betty C Wheaton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Wilson, Betty Sue .... Manhattan 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Billy L Eureka 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Dale E Wellington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture, 

















Kit m , ini 




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ft ^ ^ 



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Top Row 

Wilson, Glenna G Manhattan 

Junior in Home Economics 

Wilson, Gwen .... Overland Park 
Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Henry W Hoisington 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Wilson, James A Mission 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Philip Abilene 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Raymond R Lyons 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wilson, Royal D Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wilson, Scott I Lawrence 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Wilson, Thomas S. . . . Council Grove 
Freshman in Agriculture 

Wilson, Wendell D Sterling 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Windisch, George A. ... Louisburg 
Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Second Row 

Windier, Lester A Paola 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Winger, Melvin D Johnson 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wingert, Katherine .... Welkville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Wingfield, John Norton 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Winteroth, Robert S Concordia 

Junior in Agriculture 

Winters, John C Kansas City 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Winterscheidt, Kenneth .... Seneca 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Wise, Harold L Clearwater 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 



Wise, Stanford L Clearwater 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wiseman, Dale E Centralia 

Sophomore in Agriculture 

Wiseman, Lloyd Centralia 

Junior in Agriculture 

Third Row 

Wissing, Robert E. ..... Salina 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Witt, Gloria I St. John 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Woerner, Dale E Clifton 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wohlberg, John Bruce . . . Manhattan 
Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wolf, Mary Alice .... McPherson 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Wolfe, Clayton C Atchison 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wolfe, Norva J Phillipsburg 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wolgast, Jo Anne Marysville 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Woltkamp, Clarence G Seneca 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Womack, John J. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 
Sophomore in Agriculture 

Womack, Richard R Iola 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Bottom Row 

Wood, Howard C Elmdale 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Wood, Howard N Manhattan 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wood, James P Clifton 

Junior in Agriculture 



Wood, Joseph E Moran 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wood, Mary J Clifton 

Junior in Home Economics 

Wood, Ramon A Abilene 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wood, Stanley C Elmdale 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Woodard, Jack L Wichita 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 
Woodburn, Louis E., Jr. 

Minneapolis, Minn 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Woodruff, Marilee Ada 

Junior in Home Economics 

Woodson, Robert E. . . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

"BUTCH" MILLER PLAYS WAITRESS at the foot- 
ball barbeque for which the Wildkittens hooked the 
Chamber of Commerce. The boys got plenty to eat 
and got acquainted with Aggieville and downtown 
supporters. 




Top Row 

Woodward, Herbert W. . . Hutchinson 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Woodward, Joan D Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Woodward, John D Suffolk, Va. 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Woodward, Wayne E Richland 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Woodward, William R. . . Hutchinson 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Worley, Doris J Piedmont 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Worley, Maurice J Hanston 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Worley, Richard L Formoso 

Freshman in Agriculture 

Wormian, Kay Winfield 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Wright, Hervey W., Jr Mission 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wright, Jim L Medicine Lodge 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Second Row 

Wright, John N Riley 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wright, Rosemary Norwick 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Wullschleger, Richard D., Jr. . Frankfort 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 



Wurster, Norma I. ... Smith Center 
Freshman in Home Economics 

Wyatt, Raymond A Atchison 

Junior in Agriculture 

Wyble, Charles H Gridley 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Wylie, David A Clay Center 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Wylie, Frank G Clay Center 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Wyse, Beth A Hutchinson 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Yadon, Robert E Oswego 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 
Yapp, Robert C Manhattan 

Junior in Agriculture 

Third Row 

Yaussi, Vernon S Hiawatha 

Junior in Agriculture 

Yeager, Harold E Admire 

Junior in Agriculture 

Yearwood, Joan Manhattan 

Freshman in Home Economics 

Yemm, Richard S Belleville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Yemm, William B Belleville 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 



Yoder, Robert A Conway 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Youmans, Russell O. . . . Kansas City 
Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Young, Joe O Council Grove 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Young, Robert E Topeka 

Sophomore in Engineering and Architecture 

Young, William W. . . Ft. Harrison, Ind. 

Sophomore in Arts and Sciences 

Zacharias, David L Onaga 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 

Bottom Row 

Zarger, Betty . . . . . . Manhattan 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Zibell, June A Holton 

Sophomore in Home Economics 

Zimbelman, Kenneth ... St. Francis 

Freshman in Engineering and Architecture 

Zimmerman, John L.- '■', .... Chanute 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Zimmerman, Victor .... Alta Vista 

Freshman in Arts and Sciences 

Zink, Claude H Meade 

Junior in Engineering and Architecture 

Zink, Mary Frances . . . Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Junior in Arts and Sciences 
Zurfluh, Walter E Clifton 

Sophomore in Agriculture 






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HOTEL 

WAREHAM 



OPERATED BY WAREHAM BROTHERS 
KANSAS STATE ALUMNI 



EDDIE BOTTERMAN, MANAGER 

NEW-COMPLETELY MODERN 
COFFEE SHOP 

MANHATTAN'S FINEST 




410 



(fi5)TMlg 



Manhattan's 


Leading Department Store 


ALWAYS 


WELCOME 


YOUR VISITS 


QUALITY REASONABLE 


MERCHANDISE PRICES 




Robert C. Smith 

Jeweler 



329 Poyntz 



Manhattan, Kansas 



the 

WESTERN GROCER 

Company 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



d 



u. 







u 



MANHATTAN 



KANSAS 



411 



WELCOME 



COMMENCEMENT 



VISITORS 



•• 



ENJOY YOUR STAY AT THE 



GILLETT HOTEL 



'GOOD FOOD . . . GOOD SERVICE" 



Del Close 
jeweler 



Rings 
Silver 
Watches 

108 SOUTH FOURTH STREET 




and 



SPORT SHOP 



431 POYNTZ 



PHONE 2122 



CONGRATULATIONS 



GRADUATES 



and 



Protect Your Eyes! 

BETTER LptT 



= BETTER SIGHT 



REpW- 



El 



More POWER To You! 



REDDY KILOWATT 

Your Electric Servont 




THI KANSAS 



POWER and LIGHT COMPANY 



) 




412 



■■■ : :|"l: 



*" 'j^fcSl 







'V^ 




S|S*i 






THE NEW CAR DEALERS OF MANHATTAN EXTEND BEST WISHES AND 

CONGRATULATE THE GRADUATES 



BENTRUP-SHIELDS, INC. 
Ford Mercury 

BREWER MOTOR CO. 
Chevrolet 

BREDENBERG AUTO CO. 
Dodge Plymouth 

GOETSCH IRVINE MOTOR CO., INC. 
Chrysler Plymouth 

MANHATTAN MOTORS, INC. 
Buick Oldsmobile 



MILLER AUTO EXCHANGE 
Pontiac Packard 

MODERN MOTORS 
Kaiser Frazer 

SAGER'S 
DeSoto Plymouth 

STANFORD-NASH MOTORS, INC. 
Nash 

SMITH MOTORS 
Hudson 



TRI COUNTY MOTOR CO. 
Studebaker 



413 



GREETINGS 
.... from 



^ttmnmm 



For The Past 25 Years — The Stevenson's 
Label — Has been worn by Kansas State 

Men and Women, 



HOME FURNISHINGS 

AND 

APPLIANCES 

Home of General Electric Merchandise 

Dodd's 

Manhattan, Kansas 
417 Poyntz Dial 4080 



"Your Bowling Host" 



PLA-MOR, INC. 



316 Houston 



Phone 4813 



YELLOW CAB CO. 

A Kansas State Booster 



Manhatans Finest One-Stop Service 

FARRELL'S SINCLAIR 
SERVICE 

FIFTH & POYNTZ 



MUSIC-RECORDS-RADIO 

Westinghonse Appliances 
We rent radios and record players 




1225 Moro 



Phone 3221 



414 



VAN'S AUTO SHOP 



1125 Moro 



Phone 4235 



JERRY NOLL 



BATTERIES - TIRES - LUBRICATION - ICE 
Aggieville Texaco Station 

1231 Moro Phone 3983 



CONGRATULATIONS 

Class of 
1948 



rnO 




ASHLE.V L. /TMONAHAN 

62/ florth Manhattan Ctvenue 



DOLLY'S K-LUNCH 



MEALS 



SHORT ORDERS 



DELICIOUS HOMEMADE PIES 




DIAMONDS . . . 
The Gem Invincible 

Beautifully Mounted 
to meet YOUR exacting approval 

REED'S TIME SHOP 

Aggieville 



SHAMROCK TAVERN 



ff 



The Aggieville Oasis" 



BEER 



CIGARETTES 



DIAL 4184 



619 N. 12th 




415 



% 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 
AVAILABLE 




Save Your Money 



For a College Education 

UNION NATIONAL BANK 



BOTTGER'S L G. A. 

in Aggieville 


Join the Crowd! 

Follow the parade to 

DUCKWALL'S 

• Quality 



A-V SNACK SHACK 



POPCORN 
CANDY 



ICE CREAM 
MAGAZINES 



South of Sosna Theatre 



R. H. BROWN MUSIC CO. 

Music and Musical Merchandise 

HOBBY SHOP SUPPLIES 



SERVICE 



PRICE 



Save At 

DUCKWALL'S 

AGGIEVILLE 



416 




BEST WISHES TO THE GRADUATES OF '48 FROM THE MANHATTAN CLEANERS 



BONY'S CLEANERS 



KROELL'S CLEANING 



706 N. Manhattan 



1109 Moro 



CAMPUS CLEANERS 



MANHATTAN CLEANERS 



1219 Moro 



204 Humboldt 



COLLEGE CLEANERS 



NU WAY CLEANERS 



1216 Moro 



722 N. Manhattan 



IDEAL CLEANERS 



STICKEL CLEANERS 



1206 Moro 



714 N. 12 



417 



WARREN CAFE 


Standards of Quality . . . 


212 S. 4th Phone 2518 


Pepaco Eggs 


"EXQUISITE" 


Perry Royal Poultry 


... is what our chef says when he tastes before 
we serve. 


Perrypak Feeds 


You'll agree. Come in to dine in the finest. 


Perry Chicks 


Watehes, Clocks and Their Repair 


$ ' 


Bands, Chains and Accessories 




BRADSTREET 


THE 


Watchmaker and Jeweler 


PERRY 


State Thr. Bldg. 4th and Houston 


PACKING 


Rings, Jewelry and Their Repair 
Pens, Gifts and Novelties 


COMPANY 




Let Aggie Hardware- 



SUPPLY YOUR 



MECHANICAL 



NEEDS 



AND YOUR 



PICTURE FRAMES 



AGGIE HARDWARE & ELECTRIC CO. 



PHONE 2993 



1205 MORO 



418 



Whenever Food Is The Word 



Students Choose 







STEAKS 


Caterpillar 

REG. U. S. ■ PAT. OFF. 


SANDWICHES 




PASTRIES 




SHORT ORDERS 


Tractors — Earth-moving Equipment 


SOUPS 


Diesel Engines — Motor Graders 


DINNERS 






MARTIN TRACTOR COMPANY, Inc. 


Scheu's 


TOPEKA — KANSAS — CHANUTE 



One Class 



YOU CANT CUT GRACEFULLY 



Schedule 
Line No. 


SUBJECT 


Cr. 
Hrs. 


Room 


Time 












1 


CANTEEN LAB 


5 


YES 


MTWTF 













(NO PREREQUISITE) 



College Canteen 




419 



WATERS HARDWARE 


"BOBART'S" 


GENERAL HARDWARE 


THE MAN'S STORE 


AND 


FAMOUS NAMES IN 


GIFTS 


MEN'S FURNISHINGS 


SERVING 


Just off the Campus 


MANHATTAN JUNCTION CITY 


1210 Moro Phone 4237 


MANNING'S CAFE 


BOOKS — STATIONERY 


GOOD CLEAN FOOD 




Sosna Theatre Bldg. 


OFFICE SUPPLIES 


F. W. W00LW0RTH 


Pollom's Book Store 



X 

o 

to 

Z 
U3 
> 

o 

Ul 
H 
Z 



to 

H 
K 

I 
to 

< 
H 

< 

z 

< 

2 



WILSON BROTHERS FURNISHINGS . . . KNOX HATS . . z 

G 

Z 

2 
■ 

CO 

G 
HART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES £ 



&on 



CLOTHIER/ 



COOPER'S JOCKEY SHORTS 



in 

X 

o 

m 



AQUA-PRUF HATS . . . BOTANY TIES . . . FORTUNE SHOES . 



> 

> 

Z 

in 
X 
O 
m 



420 



CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY 



SOSNA 
WAREHAM 
STATE 
CARLTON 




Movies Are Your Greatest Entertainment 



* 



* 



H* 



\ 



V* 



Where therein always 



%\ 




M • / 



.•9.0' 



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MPPElNIi 



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a vine 
POoiroR 1 

FX£RC)S£ 



♦qSK 



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A// /he conveniences of o metropolitan hotel are yours at the 



HOTEL CONTINENTAL 

In the midst of things in KANSAS CITY, MO. 



H. GRADY MANNING DIRECTION Southwest Hotels, Inc. R- E. McEACHIN 

Founder managing Director 



a 



* 



•v N < 



421 



Kjjjicial Jttoyal JTurple JrhotograpJiers 




$k 



1DK0 MUMi 



\Jur ibpecialty : JT or trait Jrhotography 







Laurence W. Blaker 



1200 MORO 



DIAL 3434 



422 



FUTURE — UNKNOWN 



BUT LET INSURANCE 
MAKE IT SAFER 




UTUAL LIFE 



CE 



HOME OFFICE, MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
ESTABLISHED 1918 OLD LINE LEGAL SERVICE 



AGGIEVILLE BARBER 




SHOP 

1226 Moro Phone 4963 


COMPLETE LINE 

of HOME FURNISHINGS 


"LEO'S" 




VARSITY DRUG STORE 


ATTRACTIVELY PRICED 


1224 Moro Phone 2044 






at 


You Are Always Welcome in Our 




Record Department 


ROBERTS FURNITURE 


YEO & TRUBEY ELECTRIC CO. 


STORE 


"Everything Electrical for Home and Farm" 


1120 Moro Phone 2364 


Dial 4844 1204 Moro 





423 



CAMERA & SPORT MART 



Indian Sales & Service 



212 MORO 



PHONE 2519 



SMART SHOP 



Stop at ^Kaup's for 

Quality Furniture 

and Floor Coverings 
Frigidaire Refrigerators 
Electric Ranges 



1210 MORO PHONE 4217 


Home Freezers 




Zenith Radios 


TAP ROOM 












1112 MORO PHONE 3979 






KAUP FURNITURE STORE 




A. V. NEWSTAND 


304 Poyntz ..Dial 3236 


— MOST ANYTHING — 


Manhattan, Kansas 


OPEN TILL 10 1130 MORO 






Serving Manhattan 

and Vicinity Since 

1909 With 

Quality Variety Goods 

SAVE AT 



DOWNTOWN 

3 20 Poyntz Ave. 




424 



OUR OBJECTIVES ARE: 

1. Educational Advancement 

2. Industrial Development 

3. Agricultural Advancement 



4. Business Promotion 

5. Civil Improvement 




Manhattan Chamber 



of Commerce 



an 



d 



Junior Chamber of 



Commerce 




The QUALITY of 

the Crop You Reap 

Depends on the 



Seed You Sow 



CENTRAL STATES SEED COMPANY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SEEDS 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 

The Seed with the growing reputation 



425 



GREETINGS . 



* € 



from YOUR officio 



KANSAS STATE FAIR 



HUTCHINSON 



1948 Dates . . . September 19-24 



Plan NOW to exhibit and attend 




A STORE IS KNOW'N BY 
THE HOUSE IT KEEPS . . . 

MAKE YOUR SELECTION FROM ONE OF OUR 
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED BRANDS 

OIARDfn.KfLLfft 

MANHATTAN'S STORE fOR WOMEN 



HOSIERY 

KAYSER 
HOLEPROOF 
LA FRANCE 
STRUTWEAR 

LINGERIE 

RARBIZON 
MISS ELAINE 
LUXITE 
GOLDETTE 

DRESSES 

MARY MUFFET 
CAROLE KING 
JOAN MILLER 
NELLY DON 
MARTHA MANNING 
PEREZ 

COATS & SUITS 

PRINZESS 
, ROTHMOOR 
SHAGMOOR 
TED STEIN 
ROSEWIN 
BETTY ROSE 
MARY LANE 



426 




Bottled Under Authority of the Coca-Cola Company hy 

Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
oi Manhattan 



In Salina It's — 



HAGGART-GAWTHROP 



155 N. Santa Fe 



MEN'S WEAR 



Serving the Men of Salina 

for more than thirty-nine 

years 



tyocvi *}ttueAt*He*tt — is four years of your life plus expenses while in school. 

tyowi TQeturut — is an average of $130,000 more earnings than you would have without your education. 

tyocci ^uttf — is to protect those who share this investment with you. 




Kansas (tf y 



KANSAS CITY LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Kansas City, Missouri 



Southern Kansas 
Orville R. Eby, General Agent 
Wichita, Kansas 



Northern Kansas 

W. C. Jones, General Agent 

Kansas City, Missouri 



427 




No matter how small your need for our Services — either as a Borrower or Depositor- 
you are always welcome at this Bank. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



Member F.D.I.C. 



Member Federal Reserve 



ARROW SHIRTS 



DOBBS HATS 



■ -p'5 

Hi 





The 



Palace 



WOMEN'S SHOP 

Second Floor 
141 North Santa Fe 

Salina, Kansas 



KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES 



INTERWOVEN SOCKS 



428 




All School Books 
and Supplies 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Friendly Book Store Nearest the College 



Do You Need ? ? 

Oil Change 

Lubrication 

New Tires 

or 
Tire Repair 

JIM ROMIG'S CONOCO 

601 N. Manhattan 



For the REST of Your Life 



LAMER HOTELS 



SALINA — HAYS — ABILENE 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 



Stiefel's 

SAUNA'S • LARGEST . RETAIL • ESTABLISHMENT 



For Over Forty Years, serving and growing 
with this community in size and friendliness 



429 




THE LUMBER COMPANIES OF MANHATTAN SERVING THE PEOPLE 



COFIELD LUMBER CO. 



GRIFFITH COAL & LBR. CO. 



431 S. 5th 



3rd & Humboldt 



GOLDEN BELT LUMBER CO. 



LAMBERT LUMBER CO. 



231 Pierre 



112 N. 2nd 



RAMEY BROS. LUMBER & COAL 



1 3 1 Houston 



430 



Noon Rush 

AND MANY STUDENTS 
HEAD FOR 






u 



in Aggieville 



ART CRAFT 
PRINTERS 



The Plant of 
Quality and Service 



JONES & BUSENBARK 



Proprietors 
DIAL 2065 



222 Poyntz Ave. 



Manhattan, Kans. 




Kansas State's Modern Book Store 
With the Friendly College Atmosphere 

CAMPUS BOOK STORE 



AGGIEVILLE 



PHONE 3156 



431 



General Index 



— A — 



Abbey, Charles — 197, 303 

Abbott, Donald — 76 

Abbott, Gerald — 194, 342 

Abed, Khaled — 79, 89, 303 

Abel, George — 113 

Ableson, Arlene — 130, 136, 184, 342 

Abramczyk, Julius — 106 

Acacia — 188 

Academic Dishonesty Committee — 38 

A Cappella Choir — 272 

Achterberg, Gayle — 99 

Acker Vernon — 118 

Ackerman, Gene — 115, 198, 100, 342 

Acre, Robert, Jr. — 81, 85, 15 3, 342 

Adams Forrest — 148 

Adams, Franklin A., Jr.— Ill, 201, 303 

Adams, George E., Jr. — 74, 303 

Adams, George F. — 155, 201, 303 

Adams, H. Dean — 112 

Adams, H. Joseph— 187, 190, 342 

Adams, Howard C. — 342 

Adams, James W. — 112 

Adams, J. Patricia — 149, 168, 303 

Adams, Martha J. — 135,180,285,288, 

303 
Adams, Mary E. — 342 
Adams, Patricia — 151, 186,272,342 
Adams, Paul — 112, 342 
Adams, Ralph L. — 188, 342 
Adams, Robert R. — 113 
Adams, Robert T., Jr. — 117, 203, 342 
Adams, William D.— 115, 155 
Adams, Willis E. — 112, 192, 218, 342 
Adamson, Lucile — 162, 303 
Adamson, Richard — 113 
Addington, Janice — 178, 342 
Adee, Barbara — 153, 162, 342 
Adee. Lawrence — 101, 155, 200, 303 
Adee, Lowell — 77, 87, 218, 303 
Adee, Martha— 81, 102, 162, 342 
Adee, Myrna — 151, 167, 303 
Adell, Dorothy — 149, 151 180, 342 
Adell, Jerome — 303 
Adell, Wendell — 204, 342 
Administrators — 34, 35 
Adrian, Kenneth — 95, 96, 132, 303 
Advertisi ng — 4 10-431 
Ag Student Magazine — -278 
Agee, Miles — 108 
Ag Barnwarmer — 71 
Agriculture Association — 73 
Agriculture Council — 73 
Agriculture Economics Club — 79 
Agriculture Education Club — 79 
Ahearn, M. F.— 144 
Aiken, John— 108, 127, 129, 195, 215, 

342 
Ainslie, Harry— 82, 195, 342 
Akins, Howard — 112, 188, 342 
Al-Ani Hussain — 89, 342 
Albee, Patricia — 342 
Albers, A. Warren— 112 150, 342 
Albers, Byron— 75, 81, 113, 150 195, 

342 
Albora, John — 342 
Albrecht, Oscar — 79, 279, 342 
Albright, James — 303 
Albritton, Dorothye — 196, 303 
Alden, Ralph — 78 
Alderman, John — 155 
Alderman, Kenneth — 115, 342 
Alderman, Margaret — 81, 149, 151, 162, 

342 
Aldous, Joan — 128 
Alefs, Elinor— 181, 342 
Alexander, Donald— 78, 144, 283, 284, 

342 
Alexander, James — 196, 342 
Alexander, Richard L. — 101 
Alexander, Richard M. — 201, 342 
Alford, Lynn — 97, 131, 132, 303 
Allen, Charlotte — 342 
Allen, Christine — 80, 105, 342 
Allen, Dale — 81, 119, 342 
Allen, Donald D. — 81, 113 
Allen, Donald L.— 193, 342 
Allen, Glen— 79, 133, 278, 303 
Allen, Guy— 258 
Allen, Ilene— 106 
Allen, Joyce — 342 
Allen, Leland— 95, 303 
Allen, Roscoe — 80, 342 
Allen, Warren— 112, 342 
Allen, William E.— 112 
Allen, William T.— 112, 201, 342 
Allensworth, James — 132 
Allgire, G Wayne — 204, 342 
Allingham. Robert— 118, 201, 342 
Allman, John, Jr.— 80, 151 
Allman, LeRoy— 129, 134, 202,283,303 
Allman, Yvonne — 282 
Allphin, Don— 342 
Almquist, LoRee — 342 
Almquist, Orpha — 342 
Alpers, Wayne — 112 
Alpha Chi Omega — 178 
Alpha Delta Pi — 179 



Alpha Delta Theta — 136 

Alpha Gamma Rho — 189 

Alpha Kappa Lambda — 190 

Alpha Mu— 133 

Alpha Phi Omega — 94 

Alpha Tau Omega — 191 

Alpha Xi Delta — 180 

Alpha Zeta — 133 

Alsafer, Thabit — 89, 342 

Altepeter, Joseph — 101, 155, 342 

Ameel, Dr. D. J. — 45 

American Guild of Organists — 84 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

—101 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 

— "95 
American Society of Agricultural Engi- 
neers — 100 
American Society of Civil Engineers — 98, 

99 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 

—97 
Amerine, Marie — 168, 272, 342 
Amicossembly — 161 
Amistad — 160 
Amrine, Raymond — 342 
Amstutz, Joan — 181, 303 
Amstutz, John — 203, 342 
Ancell, Darrel — 303 
Andersen, Bernhardt — 303 
Andersen, Erling — 116 
Anderson, Arnold — 151 
Anderson, Bernard — 115 
Anderson, Carl — 180 
Anderson, Carolyn — 80, 130, 162, 342 
Anderson, Douglas — 113 
Anderson, Elden — 81, 112, 342 
Anderson, Forrest — 342 
Anderson, John — 97, 132, 303 
Anderson, Joyce — 104, 151, 342 
Anderson, Carl— 204, 342 
Anderson, Marjorie — 106 
Anderson, Nels, Jr. — 96 
Anderson, Robert L. — 155, 343 
Anderson, Robert W.— 79, 155, 343 
Anderson, Ruth — 343 
Anderson, Wallace — 95, 151, 343 
Anderson, Wayne — 343 
Anderson, Wendell — 78, 155, 343 
Anderson, William D.— 151, 343 
Anderson, William F. — 128, 138, 269, 

271, 303 
Anderson, Wilma — 63 
Andra, Lawrence — 116 
Andrea, Walter — 204, 303 
Andrews, Arthur — 87 
Andrews, Howard — 343 
Andrisevic, James — 96, 155, 343 
Anglemyer, Martin — 96, 303 
Ansdell, William — 99 
Antrim, Seth — 150, 251 
Apel, J. Dale — 81, 11'6, 343 
Apollo, Calvin — 343 
Appling E. Bruce — 303 
Apportionment Board — 38 
Arand, Harvey — 81, 119, 343 
Arcadia — 166 
Archer, Rex — 188, 343 
Arensman, Elnora — 169, 343 
Argabright. Joan — 183, 343, 300 
Arganbright, Venetta — 106 
Armantrout, George — 116 
Armitage, J. Constance — 91, 186, 187, 

288, 343 
Armstrong, Archie — 155, 199, 303 
Armstrong, Charles — 79, 80, 148, 172, 

343 
Armstrong, Elizabeth — 155 
Arndt, Albert — 343 
Arnold, Dean — 202, 343 
Arnold, Don— 202, 343 
Arnold, Iris — 147, 168, 272, 
Arnold, Loren— 95, 343 
Arnold. Maurice — 205, 343 
Arnold, Ralph— 78, 90, 144, 
-101, 205, 



Auerbach, Gerald — 188, 343 

Aufdemberge, Melvin — 119, 279, 343 

Aufderheide, Staff Sgt. James — 110 

Auglemyer, Martin — 272 

Austin, Margaret — 151, 164, 343 

Averill, Charles— 194, 343 

Avery Tom — 77, 120, 271 

Ayars, Dean — 1 12 

Aye, William — 116, 201, 343 

Ayers, Terry — 192, 343 



343 



343 
343 



343 



272, 294, 



104, 227, 



Arnold, Robert F 

Art, Oren — 343 

Artman, Phyllis — 136, 179, 

Aschenbrenner, Frank — 155 

Asher, Herbert — 343 

Asher, Madeline — 87, 180, 

343 
Asher, Reginald — 101, 343 
Ashlock, Donna — 102, 103, 

343 
Askins, Keith— 193, 303 
Aspelin, Esther — 104, 343 
Asper, Darwin — 83, 197, 343 
Associated Veterans — 1 20 
Atchison, Don — 112 
Athletic Council — 216 
Atkeson, F. W. — 82 
Atkins, Dana— 219, 220, 242, 244 
Atkinson, Dr. F. W. — 41 
Atkinson, Joe — 109 
Atkinson, Richard, Jr. — 101, 343 
Atteridg, George Jr. — 113, 343 
Atwell, Leroy— 75, 80, 147, 279, 
Atwood, Margaret — 85, 160, 168, 
Aubel, William— 201, 343 



B — 



247 



343 
343 



Babb. Beverley — 179, 344 
Babb, Frances — 106 
Babb, Howard — 303 
Babcock, Elliott — 204, 344 
Babcock, Henry— 97, 132, 192, 303 
Babcock, Dean R. W.— 216 
Babson, Robert — 198, 303 
Bachelor, William — 202, 303 
Backman, Howard — 116, 344 
Bacon, Leonard — 344 
Bacon, Pete — 88, 198, 218, 288, 344 
Badders, George, Jr. — 344 
Baden, Alfred— 132. 155, 344 
Bader, James — 77, 274 
Bader, Robert — 83, 205, 344 
Badgley. William — 344 
Badley, Jo Ann — 138, 186, 303 
Badley, Maurice — 203, 344 
Baehr, William — 45 
Baehr, William M.— 112, 344 
Baertch, Sue — 168, 344 
Baetz, William — 99, 192, 272, 275, 344 
Bagley, Edgar — 88, 144 
Baier, Robert — 98, 197, 303 
Bailey, Arlo — 205, 344 
Bailey, Keith — 344 
Bailey, Robert E. — 344 
Bailey, Robert V. — 344 
Bair, Mary — 105, 151, 164, 344 
Bair Ross— 194, 344 
Baird, Harry — 61 
Baird, Leland — 202, 344 
Baird, Catherine — 344 
Baker, Alice— 80, 105, 154, 162, 344 
Baker, Aloysius — 155, 344 
Baker, Barbara — 102, 130, 153, 184, 344 
Baker, Burl — 90, 160 344 
Baker, Gilbert — 344 
Baker, Glenna — 169, 344 
Baker, Dr. H. Leigh— 45 
Baker, Herbert — 83 
Baker, Herbert E. — 1 1 2 
Baker Homer Jr. — 118, 194, 344 
Baker, James C. — 113, 344 
Baker, James D. — 303 
Baker, John C, Jr. — 344 
Baker, John T.— 128, 132, 303 
Baker, Leonard — 344 
Baker, L. V. — 104 
Baker, Natalie — 162, 344 
Baker, Patricia — 102, 145, 184, 344 
Baker, Philip — 87, 117, 344 
Baker, Raymond — 344 
Baker, Robert — 247 
Baldenow. Bill — 237 
Balderson, Charles — 344 
Baldwin, Frances — 162, 344 
Baldwin, James — 344 
Baldwin, Lois — 172, 303 
Baldwin, Mark — 112, 344 
Ballou, Corliss — 81, 344 
Bamford, Barbara — -154 
Bandel, Arnold — 344 
Bands — 274 

Banman, Alvin, Jr. — 80, 113, 344 
Banowetz, Leonard — 155, 193, 303 
Baptist Youth Fellowship — 148 
Barb, Dale — 100 
Barb, Gayle — 344 
Barb, Glen — 97, 303 
Barb, Melvin — 101 218, 344 
Barber, Arleta — 106, 151, 279 
Barber Dorothy — 161, 166, 344 
Barber, Robert — 303 
Barcellina, Dwain — 116, 344 
Barclay, James — 109 
Barclay, Nelda — 161, 168, 344 
Bard, Russel — 117 
Bare, Chester, Jr. — 344 
Barfoot, Dorothy — 53 
Barger, Donald — 344 
Barger, Lester — 108 
Barger, Lloyd — 1 1 5 
Barham, Doran — 202, 344 
Barham, Dr. H. N. — 63 
Barham, Harold, Jr. — 303 
Barham, Jean — 303 
Barham, Shirley — 186, 294, 344 
Barker, Barbara — 164, 344 
Barker, Jared — 100, 146, 344 
Barlow, Martha — 78, 179, 344 
Barndollar, Pratt, Jr.. — 197, 344 
Barnes, Bill — 76, 197, 345 
Barnes, E. Louise — 103, 149, 171, 227, 
345 



Barnes, John — 112 

Barnes, Orville — 97, 303 

Barnett, Irvin — 98, 131, 303 

Barney, Duane — 101, 113, 146, 345 

Barnowski, Kenneth — 115, 345 

Barnowski, Walter — 345 

Barr, J. Albert — 148, 345 

Barr, Rosamary — 178, 187, 295, 345 

Barr, Phyllis — 128, 130, 136, 171 

Barr, Robert — 198, 345 

Barrett, Edgar — 345 

Barrett, Ernie — 116, 237 

Barrett, Fred — 113, 193 345, 

Barrett Paul — 345 

Barrett, Ralph — 109 

Barrett, Reva — 345 

Barrett, Theodore — 113, 345 

Barrett, Wallace — 345 

Barrett, William J. — 87 

Barrett, William N.— 116 

Barstow, Janis — 152, 178, 345 

Barta, John, Jr. — 345 

Bartel, Earl — 345 

Barrels, Wayne — 150, 218, 345 

Bartholomew, David — 112, 153, 279 

Bartleson, Harold — 112. 152 146 

Bartlett, Gailand — 84, 194, 345 

Bartley, Derrill — 193, 219, 247, 345 

Bartley, Gabe — 247 

Barton, Ada — 91, 345 

Barton, William — 116 

Bartslas Ed — 155 

Bascom, George — 192, 345 

Bascom, John — 274, 275, 279, 345 

Baseball — 240-247 

Basketball — 228-237 

Bates, Carol — 186, 288, 345 

Bates, James — 77, 87 

Bathurst Verne — 74, 88, 345 

Batt, Robert — 192, 345 

Batten, Clifford — 136, 192, 345 

Batten, George Jr. — 345 

Battin, James — 203, 345 

Battin, Mary — 164 

Bauer, Carl — 74, 86 

Bauersfeld, Ruth— 87, 149, 151, 180, 

345 
Bauman, Nellie — 162, 345 
Baxter, Charles — 205, 345 
Baxter, Leslie, Jr. — 118, 345 
Baxter, Wilfried — 345 
Bayer, Teddy — 116 
Bayles, Elsie — 106 
Bayles, Janice — 178, 345 
Bayles, Robert — 112 
Bays, Olga — 63, 164, 303 
Baysinger, Roy — 131, 132, 303 
Beach, Arthur — 203, 303 
Beale, William — 85 
Beam, Francis — 109 
Beam, Geraldine — 87, 138, 274 
Bean, Charles — 345 
Bear, Harmond — 131, 132, 303 
Bearce, Loren — 345 
Beardmore Jean — 303 
Bearman. Charles — 82, 83, 303 
Bearse, Loren — 151 
Beat, Arthur — 81, 82, 155, 199, 345 
Beauty Queens — 290-295 
Beaver, Earl— 187, 188, 345 
Beaver, Eugene, Jr. — 118 
Beaver, James — 187, 188, 345 
Beaver, Ray — 147 
Beaver, Rodney — 190, 303 
Bebermeyer, Dorothy — 81, 102, 151, 

161, 170, 345 
Bebermeyer, Mary — 103, 164, 303 
Beck, G. H. — 82, 270 
Beck Gale — 81, 345 
Beck, Hayes — 118, 194, 345 
Beck, Henry — 82, 83 
Beck, Leon — 119, 346 
Beck Patricia — 181, 303 
Beck Virginia — 346 
Beckenhauer, William — 109, 346 
Becker, Alice — 91, 179, 346 
Becker Alvin — 112, 202, 346 
Becker, Charles — 204, 346 
Becker, Daniel — 115 
Beckett, James — 96, 193, 303 
Beckman, Martha — 88, 186, 227, 303 
Beebe Joseph — 25 3 
Beeby, Patrick — 155, 346 
Beeby, Patricia — 155, 272, 346 
Beels, Thomas — 115 
Beeman, Everett — 75, 346 
Beeman, Keith — 75, 81, 112 
Beemer, Harold — 346 
Beers, Russell — 137, 147 
Beeson, Donald — 305 
Beezley, Eugenia — 102, 103, 145, 164, 

346 
Beggs, Joan — 90, 181, 346 
Behrent, Paul — 346 
Beightel, Paul — 88, 346 
Beim Louise — 81, 271, 303 
Beitenbucker, Howard — 346 
Bell Elbert — 74 
Bell, Eleanor — 105 
Bell F. W. — 271 



432 



Bell, Jack— 192, 234, 242, 247, 346 

Bell, Jack F. — 200, 346 

Bell, Kenneth — 77, 153, 144, 346 

Bell, Leland— 119, 193, 346 

Bell, Robert— 193, 346 

Bell, "Willis — 346 

Bellairs, Harold — 117, 305 

Bellinger, Albert — 204, 305 

Bellinger, Carnot — 101, 305 

Bellinger, Clifford — 81, 346 

Beltz, Quinlin — 346 

Bemis, Guy — 88, 204, 346 

Bender, Donald — 80, 116 

Bender, Kenneth — 88, 346 

Bender, Louis, Jr. — 148, 192, 346 

Bendersky, Manuel — 108 

Bengtson, Herman — 115, 346 

Benne, Don — 81, 112 

Bennett, Frederick — 136, 251, 253, 346 

Bennett, Joan — 184, 305 

Bennett, Paul — 112 

Bennett, Prudence — 185, 303 

Bensing, Robert — 346 

Benson, Earl — 346 

Benson, Joe, Jr. — 198, 346 

Bentley, Thomas — 82, 270, 305 

Beougher, Clifford — 346 

Bercharat, Howard — 196 

Berchem, Julius — 109 

Berg, Florene — 169, 305 

Berger, Barbara — 181, 346 

Berger, Dale — 200, 305 

Berghaus, Gene — 115, 346 

Bergmann, Glenn — 346 

Bergner, Jean — 88, 162, 305 

Bergstrom, Donald — 198, 305 

Berlin. Phyllis — 275 

Bernasek, Frank — 74, 303 

Bernbeck, Donald — 116 

Berndt, Alan — 187, 346 

Berndt, Robert — 83, 346, 191 

Berner, William — 119, 346 

Berrie, Donald — 88, 151, 346 

Berry, Delbert — 78, 112, 346 

Berry, Donna — 346 

Berry, Dorothy — 136, 162, 305 

Berry, Hardy — 180, 204, 346 

Berry, Nancy — 104, 179, 346 

Berry, Robert — 136, 219, 221, 305 

Bene, Allen — 113, 346 

Bertschinger, Harold — 346 

Beshears, Jack— 202, 346 

Best, Josephine — 164, 346 

Beta Theta Pi — 192 

Bettenbrock, Dorothy — 148, 154, 346 

Bettinger, Joseph — 97, 155, 200, 305 

Betton, Matt — 37 

Betz, Loine — 104, 346 

Betz, Leona — 346 

Betz, Martha — 346 

Bhear, James — 115, 155, 199, 346 

Bickle, Donald — 88, 203, 218, 300, 346 

Bickley, Charles — 108 

Bicknell. Betty— 138, 177, 181, 218, 

227, 305 
Bideau, Edwin — 197, 346 
Bieberly, Walter — 80, 74, 128, 305 
Biehl, Henry — 95 
Bielski, Walter — 155 
Bienhoff. Edgar — 112, 346 
Bierly, Gail — 99, 347 
Biery, Ernest — 305 
Biery, Phyllis — 162, 347 
Biggs, John — 155 
Bigler, Robert — 347 
Billiard, Arthur— 97, 132, 305 
Billiard, Francis — 100, 155, 305 
Billingsley, Leslie — 196, 347 
Billington, Lois— 80, 105, 182, 347 
Binder, Julius — 75, 204, 305 
Binford, Ray — 202, 347 
Bircher, Donald— 82. 115 
Bird, Bennie — 196, 347 
Bird, Frederick — 347 
Bird, Max — 115, 347 
Bird, Ted — 115, 347 
Birk, Phyllis — 105, 149, 151, 169, 347 
Bisagno, Robert — 192, 347 
Bisbee, William — 194, 347 
Bischoff, Georgine — 102, 150, 162, 227, 

305 
Bischoff, John— 160, 347 
Bishop, Carolyn — 104, 149, 151, 347 
Bishop, Dean — 82 
Bishop, Ernest — 83 
Bishop, Howard — 132, 305 
Bishop, Mildred — 305 
Bishop, Ralph — 109 
Bistline, George — 115 
Bitts, Mildred — 104, 347 
Black, Harold — 189, 271, 305 
Black, Leslie— 89, 134, 135, 305 
Blackburn, Ben — 347 
Blackman, JoAnn — 105, 160, 164, 347 
Blackman. Merrill — 347 
Blackwelder, JoAnn — 87, 149, 151, 180, 

285, 288, 347 
Blackwell, Rosemary — 105 
Blackwell, Cora — 63 
Blaha, Bea — 172, 347 
Blair, Marjorie — 347 
Blair, Robert — 205, 347 
Blake. William — 305 
Blanchard, Albert — 148, 347 
Blanchard, Joseph — 112, 219, 226, 256 
Blanchard, Maxine — 148, 154 
Blanchat, Arthur — 88, 160, 347 



Blankenhagen, Elmer — 73, 75, 133 

Blaser, Loren — 193, 247, 347 

Blecha, Carol — 154, 186, 347 

Blecha, Frank — 61 

Blecha, Phyllis— 164, 347 

Blinn, Donald — 113, 151, 347 

Block and Bridle Club— 75 

Blood, James — 151 

Blood, Rolla Lou— 183, 272, 347 

Blood, Roy — 259, 305 

Bloomquist, Harley — 347 

Bloyd, Gerald — 347 

Blue Key— 127 

Bluhm, Vernon — 347 

Blume, George — 117 

Blystone, Edna — 80, 151, 305 

Blythe, Albert — 75, 347 

Board of Regents — 30 

Board of Student Publications — 280 

Boatright, Helen — 180, 272, 347 

Boatright, Virgil — 347 

Bochaus, Dorothy — 88, 162, 347 

Bodde, Albert — 112 

Bodine, Virgil — 191, 347 

Bogart, David — 79 

Bogina. August, Jr. — 136, 347 

Bogue, Jerry — 198, 347 

Bogue, Richard — 136, 198, 219, 226, 

347 
Bogue, Robert — 305, 347 
Bogue, Robert E. — 198, 347 
Bohannon, Capt. Frederick — 1 10 
Bohling, Victor — 347 
Bohnenblust, Dale — 160, 347 
Bohnenblust, Gene — 80, 100, 305 
Bohnenblust, Marilyn — 145, 153, 162, 

348 
Boice. Marilyn — 91, 183, 348 
Boisvert, Frances — 136, 149, 151, 348 
Boldenow, Willard — 115, 203, 348 
Bolen, Jay — 348 
Boles, John— 197, 348 
Boles, Ronald — 113, 348 
Boley, Loren — 348 
Boley, Lyle — 107, 348 
Boley, William— 109 
Bollinger, Thyra — 81, 162, 348 
Bolten, M/Sgt. James — 110 
Bolton, Vaughn — 201, 305 
Bolton, Phillip — 348 
Bond, William — 115, 192, 253, 348 
Bondurant, Dewey — 100, 128, 131, 305 
Bondurant, James — 81, 100 
Boner, Boyd — 113, 193, 237, 348 
Bonnel, Delbert — 305 
Bonnett, Bernetta — 272, 348 
Boobar, Robert — 109 
Bookwalter, Earl — 348 
Boone, Mary — 348 
Booth, Ray, Jr. — 89, 146. 148, 348 
Borchardt, Howard — 73, 77, 127, 133, 

305 
Borck, Fred — 112, 146, 188, 348 
Borck, Helen — 80, 146, 160, 348 
Bork, William — 78, 134 
Borland, William, Jr. — 278, 348 
Born, Wilbur— 218, 348 
Boror, Martin — 348 
Borst, George— 155, 199, 348 
Borst, William — 155, 199, 279, 348 
Borthwick, Don — 150, 191, 305 
Borthwick, JoAnn — 305 
Bortz, Richard — 348 
Bosley, Delbert — 113 
Bosnac, Milt — 237 
Bostwick, Aubrey — 74 
Boughton, Lowell — 117 
Boutwell, Betty — 182, 348 
Bowen, Donald — 1 1 2 
Bowen, Elvin — 348 
Bower, Ida — 348 
Bowlin. Dale — 97, 305 
Bowlin, Phyllis — 106 
Bowman, Evelyn— 104, 170, 348 
Bowman, Phil — 204, 305 
Bowman, Ray — 348 
Bowser, Estyl — 305 
Boyd, Hurshal — 172, 305 
Boyer. Boyd — 115, 348 
Boyd, Richard — 109, 348 
Boyle, Joseph, Jr. — 155 
Boyle, William — 155 
Boyles, Rodney — 203, 274, 348 
Boys, Fay — 81, 348 
Bozanic. Milton — 112, 348 
Bozeman, Earl — 348 
Bracken, Craig — 266 
Bracken, William — 189, 348 
Bradbury, George, Jr. — 109, 348 
Bradford, Vic — 245 
Bradley, Bill— 193, 348 
Bradley, Frances — 185, 348 
Bradley, Frank — 88 
Bradley, Mary — 185, 305 
Bradley, Robert — 193, 348 
Bradley, William — 115. 151, 160, 348 
Bradman, M/Sgt. Herbert W. — 110 
Bradshaw, Jeanne— 155, 184, 348 
Brady, Bowen — 112, 194, 348 
Brady, James — 188, 348 
Brady, Joseph — 77, 155, 192, 348 
Brainard, Prof. B. — 97 
Brainard, Boyd — 132 
Brainard, Kathyrn — 102, 185, 305 
Brainard, Olive — 102, 185, 348 
Brake, Benjamine — 109, 348 
Brakebill, Mary — 104, 162, 348 



Braman, Shirley — 90, 105, 153, 160, 

295, 305 
Branan, Kathryn — 164, 348 
Branan, Robert — 118, 348 
Branch, Clarence — 219, 223 
Brandner, Lowell — 134, 279 
Brandt, Harold — 348 
Brannum, Clarence — 230 
Branson, George — 348 
Branson, John — 83 
Braum, Doris — 166, 348 
Braunagel, Charles — 193, 348 
Breckenridge, Kathryn — 171, 348 
Bredbenner, Joseph — 349 
Breeden, Lowell — 219, 349 
Brees, Dale — 1 1 1 
Brelsford, Clifford — 349 
Bremmer, David — 136, 247 
Bremmer, Robert — 349 
Breneman, Rodney — 187, 198, 349 
Brenn, Ernest — 74 
Brennan, Lawrence — 349 
Brenner. Frances — 136, 161, 166, 349 
Brenner, Richard — 205, 349 
Brettschneider, Sidney — 82, 84 
Bretz, James — 82 
Bret?., Kenneth — 203, 349 
Breve, Robert — 80 
Brewer, Dean — 349 

Brewer, Doris — 134, 135, 186, 286, 305 
Brewer, Glen — 349 
Brewer, Joanne — 186, 288, 349 
Brewer. John — 98, 305 
Brewer, Robert— 118, 201, 349 
Brewster, Rev. Charles — 148 
Brewster, Phil — 116, 198, 349 
Bridge, Thomas — 83, 349 
Bridgewater, William — 82, 203, 349 
Briggs, Arch — 118 
Briggs, Edna — 154 
Brighton, Hubert — 30 
Briles, Virginia— 105. 349 
Briscoe, Marjorie — 275 
Briscoe, Robert — 1 1 5 
Briscoe, Wilber — 349 
Britt, Alan — 112, 349 
Broadie, Harold — 112, 198, 279, 349 
Broberg, Lorna — 136, 162, 349 
Broce, Deloris — 162, 349 
Brock, Don— 79, 349 
Brockey, Herbert — 1 60 
Brockman, Carl — 349 
Bronaugh, George — 112, 274, 275 
Brookover, Donald — 113, 203, 349 
Brookover, Harrison — 203, 349 
Brooks, Dale — 80 
Brooks, Harold — 86 
Brooks, Jerry D. — 117, 349 
Brooks, Jerry R. — 190 
Brooks, Ralph — 305 
Brooks, Richard — 97, 132, 305 
Brooks, Robert— 1 18, 349 
Brose, Gerald — 349 
Bross, Barbara— 138, 183, 227, 305 
Brotherson, Helen — 179, 349 
Brotherson, Jerry — 204, 349 
Brown, Don E. — 349 
Brown, Don R. — 115, 349 
Brown, Donald A. — 188, 349 
Brown, Donald F. — 349 
Brown, Donna— 15 3, 162, 349 
Brown, S/Sgt. Edward — 110 
Brown, Everett — 349 
Brown, Frank — 349 
Brown. Hannah — 91 
Brown, Harold E.— 77, 349 
Brown, Harold J. — 99, 115 
Brown, Harry — 275 
Brown, Harry C. — 100 
Brown, Harry E. — 98, 305 
Brown, J. Herbert— 95, 132, 349 
Brown, Jack— 77, 191, 349 
Brown, James M. — 117, 305 
Brown. Keith— 151, 152, 349 
Brown, Kermit — 136 
Brown, Lois — 162. 349 
Brown, Mila — 272, 294, 349 
Brown, Paul — 198, 272, 350 
Brown, Richard — 197, 350 
Brown, Robert— 76. 189, 305 
Brown, Theodore — 350 
Brown, Virginia — 162, 305 
Brown. Wallace — 75, 151, 350 
Brown, Wilbur — 218, 272. 350 
Brown, William F. — 112, 350 
Brown. William G. — 148, 256 
Browne, John — 116, 193. 350 
Brownlee. Harry — 88, 189, 350 
Brownlee, William — 115, 192, 350 
Brubaker, Jack — 350 
Brubaker. Marilyn — 333 
Bruce, Robert — 198, 350 
Bruenger. Fred— 100, 205, 350 
Brugger, Raymond — 109 
Brumfield, Loyd — 1 13 
Brumm. Velma — 78. 136 
Bruner. Eugene— -88. 144, 191, 305, 550 
Bruner, Horace — 350 
Bruner, Jack— 198, 350 
Brunnemer, Geneva — 88, 305 
Bruns, Calvin — 350 
Bryan, Ellsworth— 350 
Bryan, Harold — 136. 204, 219, 220, 350 
Bryan, Marilyn — 181. 272, 330 
Bryan, Virginia — 185, 288, 350 
Bryan, William— 350 
Bryant, James — 350 



Bryant, Nancy — 149, 162, 307 

Bryant, Theo — 78, 119 

Bryson, Harry — 86 

Buchanan, Marilyn — 172, 350 

Buchholtz, Edith — 63 

Buck, Bernard — 251 

Buck, Jim — 252 

Buckles, Floy — 350 

Buckles, Gloria — 89, 179, 305 

Buckles, Lavona — 350 

Buehler, Bruce — 190, 350 

Buehler, Robert — 201, 350 

Bugel, Lucile — 63, 155, 160, 307 

Bullinger, Lawrence — 116, 350 

Bumbaugh, Merrill — 1 1 3 

Bunge, Marjorie — 167, 307 

Bunge, Melvin — 112, 350 

Bunyan, Gerald — 109 

Burchfiel, C. Stan — 192 350 

Burdick, Earl — 117, 350 

Burdick. Ralph — 146" 

Burgert, Doris — 164, 350 

Burgess, Charles — 1 15 

Burgess, Nellie — 350 

Burgin Willis — 109 

Burgwin, Mary — 130, 179, 300, 350 

Burket, Leatrice — 278, 350 

Burkhardt, Christian — 86 

Burkhead. Burdetta — 164, 307 

Burkhead, Ilah — 136, 164, 307 

Burkhead, Melvin — 74, 204, 307 

Burkholder, William — 120 

Burklund, Wayne — 115, 350 

Burnette, Dorene — 148, 154, 162, 350 

Burns, Gordon — 350 

Burns, John — 350 

Burns. Philip — 95, 155. 199, 350 

Burns, Phyllis — 179, 350 

Burns, Richard — 75, 78, 134, 148 197. 

278, 307 
Burr, Myron — 350 
Burris, Harold — 350 
Burroughs, Jonnie — 117, 350 
Burton, Jean — 97, 132, 305 
Burton, Robert — 83 
Busby, Al — 201, 350 
Busenbark, Johnny — 115, 192,350 
Bush, Edwin — 1 1 3 
Bush, Elinor — 161 
Bush, Leola — 350 
Bush, Katherine — 171 
Bush, Marilyn — 71, 104, 179 350 
Bush, William — 82 
Bushnell, John — 96, 117, 147, 305 
Business Club — 88 
Buss, Adelia — 154 
Buster. Don — 76, 116, 192, 350 
Butcher, Frederic — 86,190 350 
Butler, Betty — 81, 182, 105, 350 
Butler, Gail — 149, 151, 162, 350 
Butler, Peggy Lou — 84, 350 
Butler. Richard — 112 
Butterfield, Gene — 119 
Button, Donald — 115, 203, 237 350 
Buxton, John — 128, 132, 307 
Byarlay, Lowell — 1 16 
Byer, Doris — 350 
Byerly, Betty — 80, 90, 182, 351 
Byerly, Carolee — 148 
Byerly, Charles — 148, 351 
Byers, Joseph — 117 
Byler, Mary — 182, 351 
Bynum. Shirley — 105, 181, 204, 215 

351 
Byrd. Glenn — 205, 272, 351 
Byrd, Sydney — 108 
Byrne, Frank — 82 



— c — 



Cable, Louis — 95, 307 

Cade. Donald — 87, 151, 351 

Cadwell, Joseph — 111, 198, 351 

Caffrey. Richard — 194, 351 

Cain, Dan — 79 

Cain, John — 351 

Cain, Richard — 107, 351 

Calderwood, Allison — 351 

Calderwood. Barbara — 351 

Caldwell, Martha — 63 

Calkins, Helen — 162, 351 

Call, Mrs. L. E. — 154 

Callaghan, Anna — 169, 351 

Callhaan, Bernard — 155, 199, 351 

Callahan. Frances — 155, 17S. 28S, 351 

Callahan, Harold — 189, 351 

Callahan, Prof. T. P. — 15 5 

Callahan, Robert — 155, 199. }5 1 

Callot. Sherman — 116. 274, 351 

Campbell. Carol — 186, 214, 215, 351 

Campbell, Charles — 112 

Campbell, Cleone — 63 

Campbell. Dean — 1 16 

Campbell. Dolores — 184. 351 

Campbell, Eugene — 202, 351 

Campbell, Eula — 128 

Campbell, Forest — 117, 197, 351 

Campbell. Robert E. — 117, 201, 351 

Campbell. Ronald — 77 

Canfield, Darrel — 116, 21S, 351 

Cannici, Harry — 1 16 

Cannon, Cynthia — 63 



433 






Cannon, William — 192, 351 

Cantrell, Keith — 98 

Caplinger, James— 1 16, 200, 35 1 

Capp. Richard — -146 

Cardwell, Dr. A. B. — 45 

Carey, Arthur— 77, 307 

Carey, Kathleen— 81, 151, 182, 295, 

351 
Carey, Vivian — 307 
Carinder, William — 77, 197, 307 
Carleton, Edwin— 116, 160, 351 
Carleton, Thomas — 109. 351 
Carleton, Tom C— 75, 270, 271 
Carlos, Robert — 307 
Carlson, Alan— 97, 307 
Carlson, Arnold — 150 
Carlson, Arthur — 109 
Carlson, Bernard — 112, 351 
Carlson, Carl W. — 74, 133, 351 
Carlson, Dallas — 35 1 
Carlson, Dayton — 1 13 
Carlson, Edward — 1 13 
Carlson, Governor Frank — 30 
Carlson, Glen — 1 1 2 
Carlson, Norris — 272, 351 
Carlson, Robert — 35 1 
Carlson, Virgil — 351 
Carnahan, Janice— SO, 102, 105, 182, 

351 
Carnahan, Quentin — 115, 196, 351 
Carpenter, Dewey — 351 
Carpenter, Frank— 75, 79, 133, 307 
Carper, Delbert— 79, 146, 351 
Carr, Dale — 136, 247 
Carr, Darrell — 1 12 
Carrasas, Olga — 85, 91 
Carroll, John— 155 
Carroll. Samuel — 351 
Carroll, Stanley — 146 
Carson, Kenneth — 351 
Cartee, Roy— 80, 147 
Cartee, Ruth — 147, 149 
Carter, Dale— 97, 307 
Carter, Noble — 307 
Carter, Richard — 1 12 
Carter, Robert — 351 
Carttar, Barbara— 102, 103, 135, 179, 

307 
Carver, Clyde— 88, 351 
Carver, Irva — 121, 186, 307 
Cary, Cecile — 149. 151, 186, 352 
Cary, Donna — 151, 352 
Cary, Harold— 99, 352 
Casady, Alfred— 307 
Case, Roland— 97, 136, 307 
Case, Wallace — 35 2 
Casement, Nancy — 104, 352 
Casement, Rollin — 75, 80, 352 
Casey, Margorie — 80 
Casey, Melv : n — 1 1 2 
Casey, Patrick — 1 1 6, 352 
Casey, Robert — 96 
Casmer, George — 352 
Cassity, Mattie — 170 
Castator, Avis — 333 
Cattle, Emery— 79. 133, 307 
Cather, Mary— 185, 352 
Cathers, Benjamin — 101, 307 
Cavin, Lyman — 205, 352 
Cazier. Helen— 81, 105, 171, 35 2 
Cederberg, Richard— 80, 200, 279, 352 
Ceranich, Anthony — 200, 352 
Ceranich, John — 307 
Chadd, Bernard— 115, 247, 35 2 
Chadwick, Theodore — 96 
Chaffee, George — -108 
Chajuss, Tamara— 84, 85, 89, 162, 352 
Chalmers, Merle — 112 
Chamberlin, Virginia — 136, 164, 352 
Chambers, Donald — 146, 352 
Chambers, Jacob — 35 2 
Chambers, Willis — 116 
Champeny, Wallace — 76, 198, 352 
Champlin. Merl — 75, 80, 151, 352 
Chance. Donna — 179. 352 
Chandler, Charles — 201, 352 
Chandler, Edward — 89 
Chandler, Rolland — 99 
Chandler, Will'am— 201, 352 
Channell, Glenn — 187, 192, 237, 352 
Chapajaros — 78 
Chapin, Bobie — 35 2 
Chapin, Wayne — 108 
Chapman, Duane — 352 
Chapman, Mary — 80, 151, 160, 352 
Chappell, Gregg — 200, 307 
Chappell, Harry — 259 
Chase. Richard — 75, 80, 115, 189, 253, 

352 
Chatterbox — 1 66 
Cheatum, Shirley — 160 
Cheerleaders — 2 1 8 
Chelikowsky. Joseph — 82, 83 
Chelstrum, Betty — 105, 162, 352 
Chenoweth, James — 151, 352 
Chesney, Robert — 81, 151, 272, 352 
Chesnut, Judd — 109 
Chestnut, William — 352 
Chew, Donald — 247 
Childers, Maxine — 179, 307 
Childress, Donald — 352 
Childs, Dana— 86, 218, 279, 352 
ChiNon, W. H.— 82 
Chi Omega — 181 
Chirwood, John — 197, 307 
Chrisman, Alvin — 95, 132 
Chrisman, Louie — 83, 113, 352 



Christensen, Stanley — 113, 352 

Christian Fellowship — 146 

Christian Student Fellowship — 147 

Christian, William — 200, 352, 405 

Christiansen, Everett — 80, 151, 352 

Christiansen, Galen — 219, 226 

Christie, Earnest — 80, 160, 352 

Christia, Leta — 186, 352 

Christopher, N.nian — 352 

Christopoulos, Thomas — 219, 221, 224 

Chronister, Joseph — 205, 352 

Chung, Edwin — 89, 352 

Church, David— 35 2 

Church, Elwyn— 108, 204, 352 

Church, William, Jr.— 221 

Claar, Samuel — 133, 186, 187, 307 

Claeren, Mrs. E. L.— 201 

Clark, Barbara — 87, 183, 35 2 

Clark, Bernard — 101, 115, 352 

Clark, Billy— 75, 80, 148, 279, 352 

Clark, Daniel— 138, 279, 352 

Clark, Diehl — 106 

Clark, Dwaine— 279, 352 

Clark, Mrs. Edith — 167 

Clark, Eileen— 162, 227, 352 

Clark, Gerald— 352 

Clark, Harris — 155, 192, 352 

Clark, James L. —190, 352 

Clark, James W. — 82, 204, 307 

Clark, Jimmie — 274 

Clark, John— 83, 203, 307 

Clark, Joseph — 118 

Clark, Karl, Jr.— 116, 352 

Clark, Kate— 80, 105, 154, 182, 307 

Clark, Laurence R. — 95, 204, 307 

Clark, Lawrence L. — 353 

Clark, Marion — 1 13 

Clark, Philip — 115 

Clark, Robert A.— 98, 115, 128, 307 

Clark, Shirley— 35 3 

Clark. Theodore— 87,95 

Clark, Ward— 203, 235, 353 

Clark, Webb— 88, 112 

Clark, William — 83 

Clarke, David — 151, 353 

Clarke, Richard — 96, 153, 353 

Clark's Gables— 167 

Clarkson, William — 155 

Clary, Donis — 81, 104, 171, 353 

Clary, Robert — 97, 278, 353 

Clay, Clarence — 274 

Claydon, T. J.— 82 

Clayton, Fred — 1 16 

Clayton, Sue— 153, 164, 35 3 

Geary, Capt. Edward— 110 

Cleavinger. Joseph — 192, 353 

Cleland, lean — 353 

Cleland, Willard— 113, 353 

Clem, Clarence — 87 

Clemens, Milton — 188, 353 

Clemens, Rex— 1 13, 188, 353 

Clements, Dale — -113 

Clennin Richard — 75, 78 

Cline, Donald— 204, 35 3 

Cline, Doris— 171, 353 

Cline, June — 164, 353 

dinger, James — 29, 144, 

Clogher, Roger — 1 1 6 

Clovia — 182 

Clowers, Richard — 83 

Club Cervantes — 89 

Coady, Betty— 184, 35 3 

Cobb, Alan — 112, 192, 353 

Coble, Alton — 100 

Cochran, Dorothy — 77, 78 

Cochran, Ethel — 162, 353 

Cochran, Helen — 167, 35 3 

Coder, Earl— 88, 120, 307 

Cody, James — 100 

Coed Court — 167 

Coffin, Ted — 116,353 

Cofran, Roswell— 197, 353 

Colby, Jane — 87, 162, 274, 353 

Colby, Roger— 204, 35 3 

Coldwell. Malcolm — 116 

Cole, Hobart — 35 3 

Cole, Robert E. — 353 

Cole, Wilbur— 101, 115,353 

Coleman, Harold — 353 

Coleman. Maxine — 353 

Coleman, Robert — 353 

Coleman, Roger — 307 

Coleman, Roy — 307 

Coleman, Russ— 116, 274, 275, 353 

Collegian— 281. 284 

Collegiate 4-H Club— 80, 81 

Collier, James — 75. 186, 271, 307 

Collinge. Irwin — 80, 109, 353 

Collins, Barbara — 78, 81, 35 3 

Collins, Billy — 115, 353 

Collins, Delores— 149. 151. 160, 353 

Collins, Doris Ann — 91, 185, 307 

Collins, Jerry — 138 

Collins, Lawrence — 307 

Collins, Mary — 162, 353 

Collins, Norman — 79, 84, 119, 196, 
276, 353 

Collins, Richard— 192, 307 

Collins. Sherwood — 197. 307 

Collins, Tenyson — 81, 101, 353 

CollVer. Mary— 87 155, 183, 272, 307 

Colt, Frank — 198, 353 

Coltrain. Wayne— 79, 81, 136, 256, 307 

Colver, William — 274, 275 

Combs, Donald — 353 

Combs, Herbert — 190, 353 

Comfort, Donna — 148 



353 



198, 288, 353 



117, 198, 353 



Comfort, Harley — 148 
Comfort, William — 96, 307 
Compton, Loren — 76, 198, 287, 288, 

354 
Condry, Carson — 97, 307 
Cone, Major Sidney — 110 
Conely, Gerald — 97, 307 
Congregational Student Fellowship — 148 
Conkey, Fordyce — 205, 354 
Conkey, Mrs. Jesse — 205 
Conley, John — 88, 111, 219, 225 
Conley, Joseph — 1 16 
Conn, James— 76, 148, 307 
Conner, John R. — 113, 354 
Connor, John W.— 198, 218, 354 
Conover, Darline — 106 
Conover, Prof. Robert — 279 
Conrad, Katherine — 160, 354 
Conrad, Ray— 202, 354 
Considine, William — 112 
Consigny, Mrs. Frederick — 184 
Converse, Faye — 105, 160, 354 
Converse, Verne — 136, 204, 219, 224, 

354 
Conway, William — 155 
Cook, Earl— 307 
Cook, Elton — 63, 74 
Cook, Hurley — 63 
Cook, Keith— 98, 200, 307 
Cook, Mary— 149, 151, 161, 168, 354 
Cook, Sarah — 182, 354 
Cool, Helen — 151, 182, 354 
Cool, Vincent — 354 
Cooley, B. Orlan — 86, 354 
Cooley, Carl— 80, 1 19, 354 
Cooley, Dnnna — 106 
Coombs, Connie — 354 
Coombs, Robert — 77, 354 
Coombs, Vincent — 82, 128 
Coon, Donna — 136 
Cooney, Mary — 185, 288, 354 
Coonrod, Carl — 87 
Cooper, Arthur — 307 
Cooper, Clarice— 102, 103, 105, 169, 

354 
Cooper, John — 96, 132, 197, 354 
Cooper, Juanita — 87, 178, 275, 354 
Cope. Charles — 200, 354 
Copeland, Capt. Lewis — 110, 119 
Copt, Christine — 155, 354 
Cordes, Harry— 115, 202, 272 
Cork, Myrna — 164, 354 
Cork, Paul— 113' 
Corke, Kenneth — 75, 148, 307 
Corkill, Philip— 354 
Cornelius, Franklin — 87 
Cornelius, Marjorie — 354 
Cory, Verna — 354 
Cosgrove, Lee — 95 
Cosmopolitan Club — 89 
Cossell, Dorothy — 180. 354 
Cossman, Donald — 193, 354 
Cossman, Fred — 131, 193, 354 
Costello, John— 1 1 2 
Costello, R. G. — 155, 197, 354 
Cotner, Melvin— 195, 278, 354 
Cotton, Barbara — 146, 354 
Cotton, Dorothy — 307 
Cotton, Margaret — 105, 146, 354 
Cotton, Maurice — 134, 181, 200, 307 
Cotts, Arthur — 96, 132, 187, 197, 354 
Couchman, Earl— 94, 101, 128, 131, 
__ 137, 202, 301, 309 
Couk, Raymond — 109 
Coulson, Mrs. Fred — 191 
Cousins, Arch — 95, 354 
Cousins, Mrs. T. H. — 172 
Cowan, Benn — 98, 172, 309 
Cowan, Charles — 354 
Cowan, Kenneth — 112, 218, 354 
Cowdery. Robert — 83, 192, 354 
Cowell, Darrell — 203, 283, 284, 285, 

288, 354 
Cowell, Wayne — 86, 151, 152 
Cox, Dan — 112, 203, 354 
Cox, Robert — 1 11 
Cox, Rufus — 39 
Cox, T/Sgt. Thomas — 1 10 
Cox, Wilbert— 201, 309 
Coy, Richard — 274, 275, 309 
Cozine, Elbert — 75, 148 
Crabb, John— 87, 97, 274, 309 
Crabb, Madge — 84, 87, 274, 275, 309 
Crabtree, Betty — 77 
Crabtree, Lyle — 77, 83 
Crackel, Gene — 117, 354 
Craft, Martha— 80, 105, 169, 354 
Craig, Gene — 1 12 
Crandall, Doris — 153, 354 
Crandall, Lester— 73, 75, 79, 195, 354 
Craven, Mary — 309 
Craven, Robert— 204, 354 
Crawford, Betty — 88, 185, 309 
Crawford, Lavon — 147, 149, 152, 354 
Crawford, Leslie — 309 
Crawford, Miriam — 354 
Crawford, William — 1 13, 200, 354 
Crawshaw, Stanley — 137, 309 
Crenshaw, Carl — 354 
Creviston. John — 354 
Crippen, Donald — 113 
Crippen Inn — 168 
Crippen, Tames — 78, 354 
Crippen, Mrs. V. S. — 168 
dispell, Robert — 109 
Crissman, Larry — 354 
Crist, Dale — 1 16 



Crnkovich, Roman — 354 

Crockett, Elvin — 99 

Crockett, James — 196, 354 

Crofoot, John — 189, 354 

Croghan.D. L. — 107 

Cronk, Donna — 164, 355 

Cronk, Maxine — 164, 355 

Crooks, Charles — 1 17 

Cross, Willis — 81, 182, 309 

Crotinger, Victor — 99, 355 

Crouch, Sara — 179, 355 

Crouch, William — 188, 355 

Crouse, J. C— 100 

Crow, Horace — 99, 193, 355 

Crow, Lawrence — 151, 279, 355 

Crow, Mildred — 172 

Crow, Richard — 355 

Crowley, Bob — 75, 80, 189, 355 

Crum, Walter — 132, 355 

Crump, John — 197, 355 

Cuculiza, Sergio — 89, 155, 355 

Cuer, Jane — 164, 355 

Culbertson, Robert — 355 

Cummings, Clyde — 355 

Cummings, Lois — 145, 147, 149, 355 

Cunningham, Bruce — 203, 35 5 

Curbey, Royal — -355 

Curnutt. Elmer — 355 

Currie, Kathleen — 355 

Currier, Dalena — 161, 166 

Currier, Marshall — 309 

Curry, Mrs. Bernice — 15 2 

Curry, George — 355 

Curry, Rev. J. W.— 152 

Curry, Jimmie — 152 

Curry, Joseph — 186, 272, 355 

Curry, Robert — 201, 219, 222, 309 

Curt-s, Arch — 204, 355 

Curtis, James — 155, 201, 218, 285, 288, 

309 
Cushing, Raymond — 155 
Cusic, Charlene — 149, 151, 164, 355 



D — 



309 



SI, 144, 153, 195, 



355 



309 



355 
184, 



Dade, Philip — 115, 355 
Dageforde, Kenneth — 81, 112, 355 
Dahl, Richard — 309 
Dahl, Robert— 192, 355 
Dahlsten. Paul— 74, 150, 
Dailey, Ruth— 180, 355 
Daily, George — 116, 355 
Daily, Harold— 355 
Dairy Club— 82 
Dalbom, Harold— 

355 
Dalke, Carl— 355 
Dalrymple, Clyde— 172, 274 
Dalrymple, Harold — 115 
Dalton, Vernon — 197, 256, 355 
Dalton, Walter — 355 
Daly, Robert — 90, 187, 204, 355 
Dameron, Helen — 29, 145, 162, 
Dam.ani, George — 89, 155 
Dancer, James — 35 5 
Daneke, Charles — 197, 355 
Danielson, Durward — 63, 137 
Danielson, Jim — 136, 249 
Dannels, Dale— 83, 116, 355 
Dannenberg, Raymond — 355 
Danner, Clark — 112, 198, 218 
Darby, Antoinette — 149, 151, 
Darland, Jacquelyn — 120 
Darling, Irvin — 108 
Darling, Joyce — 91, 181, 355 
Darrow, Edgar — 83, 355 
Daughters, Mrs. Ruth — 203 
Davenport, David — 197, 356 
Davenport, Donna — 179. 356 
Davenport, John — 197, 309 
David, Elizabeth — 81, 164, 356 
David, Leonard — 309 
David, Walter — 81, 356 
Davidson, Wayne — 274, 275 
Davies, Dale — 113, 279, 356 
Davies, Clinton — 81, 119, 279 
Davies, James — 356 
Davies, Margie — 162, 272, 
Davies, Paul — 99 
Davies, Willa — 164, 356 
Davies, Arlene— 155, 309 
Davis, Prof. C. D. — 270 
Davis, Diann — 151, 162, 356 
Davis, Donald — 202, 356 
Davis, Erma — 356 
Davis, H. W. — 45, 180 
Davis, James— 107, 187. 193 
Davis, John— 76, 197, 309 
Davis, Marilyn — 134 

309 
Davis, Patricia — 130, 138, 145, 185, 

356 
Davis, Phyliss — 106 
Davis, Richard — 112 
Davis, Roy— 96, 197 
Davis, W. E. — 155 
Davis, William — 309 
Davitt, Frances — 102, 145, 149, 151 

356 
Dawson, Alice— 184, 272, 356 
Dawson, Galen — 98, 309 
Dawson, LeRoy — 219, 222 
Day, Thomas — 356 
Day, Wilborn— 74, 80, 356 



355 



356 



356 



356 



272, 285, 288, 



309 



434 



, 356 
232, 235, 



-32,33 



242, 



356 
356 



356 



Dayhoff, Dale — 356 
Dean, George — 86 
Dean, Anne — 184, 187 
Dean, John— 136, 197, 

247, 356 
Dean, Vernon — 356 
Deans of the Schools- 
Deardorff, Beth — 169 
Deardorff, Hugh— 113 
Deasy, John — 155 
Debate Squad — 276 
DeBord, Louis — 116, 192 
Deck, Shrley— 130, 275 
Decker, Kenneth — 95 
Decker, Martin — 100, 356 
DeCou, Donald — 88 
Deets, Max — 81, 151, 152, 195, 279, 

356 
D'Elia. Anthony — 119 
DeFord, Richard — 79, 151, 356 
Degenhardt, Paul— 191, 356 
Dela Cuesta, Yezid — 89 
Delay, Earl— 97, 205, 309 
DeLong, Gene — 274, 356 
Delta Delta Delta — 183 
Delta Tau Delta— 193 
Delta Sigma Phi — 194 
Demaree, Donn — 1 1 2 
DeMars, Lloyd— 155, 309 
Demeritt, Leslie — 205, 356 
Demott, Bobby — 82 
Demott Ernestine — 106 
Demott, Howard — 356 
Demous, Ollie — 99, 356 
Denbo, Dwight — 356 
Denholm, William — 356 
Denison, Charles— 99, 191 
Denison Lesley — 178, 356 
Denman, Edwin — 188, 356 
Denneler, Daniel — 81, 115 
Denton, Leland — 309 
Depew, Don— 94, 96, 309 
Depew, Howard — 132 

DePuy, Philip— 90, 109, 144, 153, 356 
Desilet, Alvin— 115, 155, 199, 356 

Dethloff, Carl— 112, 276, 356 

Detwiler, Loren — 115, 356 

Deutscher, Verlin — 113, 356 

DeWald, Melford — 100, 204, 356 

Dewees, Laverne — 81, 105, 151, 160, 
164, 356 

Dewey, Nancy — 168, 356 

Dewhirst, Iris — 91, 356 

Dewhirst, Leonard — 356 

Dewhirst, Victor — 271 

DeWittie, H. W. — 356 

DeWittie. Mary — 356 

DeWyke, Keith— 88, 309 

Deyoe, Richard — 356 

Dibbens, Virginia — 227 

Dck, Bettye Jo — 164, 309 

Dickenson, Charles— 155, 199, 356 

Dickenson, James — 155, 199, 356 

Dickerson, Don — 193, 259, 356 

Dickers, Richard — 116, 198, 279, 356 

Dickey, Ruby— 80, 151, 182, 356 

Dickinson, Betty — 162, 227, 357 

Dickson, Lloyd— 357 

Dieter, James — 202, 357 

Dietrich, Melvin, Jr. — 109 

Dietrick.Donald— 198, 357 

Diggle, Frank — 357 

Diggle, Nancy— 127, 128, 129, 130, 
134, 186, 309, 316 

Dilworth, Morris — 357 

Dimsdale, George — 1 1 5 

Dinges, Howard — 270 

Dirks, Mario — 63, 76, 127 
136, 301, 309 

Dirks, Laurel — 86 

Dishman, Mona — 104, 180, 

Dishner, Patricia — 178, 357 

Dixon, David — 118 

Dixon, Joseph — 357 

Dixon, Robert — 115, 218, 357 

Dixson, Jimmie — 144, 357 

Dobkins, James — 79 

Dobson, Richard — 357 

Doby, Paul— 107. 186, 357 

Dodge, Gilbert — 88 

Dodge, T. O.— 88 

Dodge, Ward— 116, 357 

Dodge, William — 76 

Doebele, Patricia — 357 

Doebele, S. E. — 357 

Doege, Alberta — 357 

Dole, Claribel— 81, 164, 357 

Dole, Robert — 357 

Dolecek, Mary Ellen — 357 

Doll, Donna — 15 3, 309 

Doll, Wayne — 153, 357 

Dolton, Joseph — 200. 357 

Dombaugh, Keith — 1 1 3 

Domeny, John — 88, 200, 357 

Donahy, Ann — 80, 357 

Donmyer, John— 99, 112, 357 

Donnellan. Quentin — 94, 95, 155, 309 

Donovan. Edwin — 309 

Dooley, Dorothy — 154, 227, 

Doran. Jeanette — 145, 181, 

Dorf, C.A.— 136, 137 

Dorf, Charlotte— 127. 128, 129, 130 

136, 180, 308, 309 
Dorgan, Robert — 112 
Dornan, Wendell — 101 
Dorsey, Floyd — 99 
Dotson, John — 79 



128, 133, 



357 



357 
272, 



357 



Douce, Wayne — 118, 357 

Dougherty, Boyce — 76, 133, 186, 357 

Douglas, James — 112 

Douglas, Jean— 138, 184, 309 

Douglass, Clifton, Jr. — 109 

Douglass, George — 132, 193, 309 

Dowling, Oliver — 155 

Down, Jack — 357 

Downey, Charles — 357 

Downey, Mary — 136, 155 

Downie, John— 100, 153, 357 

Downing, Charles — 108 

Downing, Don— 115, 274, 357 

Downing, Doris— 105, 151, 357 

Downs, Robert — 357 

Doyen, Mark — 115, 357 

Doyen, Ray— 80, 133, 144, 186, 357 

Doyen, Ross — 100, 357 

Dozier, Don— 113,357 

Dozier, John — 148 

Dragoo, James — 1 16 

Drain, James — 1 15 

Drake, Elizabeth — 127, 185, 301, 309 

Drake, Larsen — 83 

Dramatics — 266, 269 

Draney, Edwin — 75, 80, 186, 357 

Drayer, Barbara — 148, 154, 309 

Drayer, Betty — 63 

Drayer, Donald — 148, 309 

Drees, William L. — 99, 155 

Dreese, Michael — 357 

Dresser, William — 237 

Driscoll, Jerry — -30 

Dronberger. Dale — 96, 131, 309 

Dronly, Edwin — 118 

Drown, James — 357 

Dubbs, Florence— 96, 170, 227, 309 

Dubin, Robert— 109 

DuBois, LeRoy — 357 

Duby, Harold— 191, 357 

Duckers, Keith — 358 

Dudley, Charles — 109 

Dudley, Earll— 98, 309 

Duell, Jonathan— 203, 358 

Duer, John — 204, 358 

Dueser, Anna — 63, 86, 155 

Duffy, Jack— 119 

Dugan, Dale — 358 

Dulaney, Rex — 203, 358 

Dunbar, Miriam — 80, 102, 149, 151, 
168, 309 

Duncan, Russell— 203, 218, 272, 358 

Dungan, Marvin— 202, 309 

Dunlap, Bruce — 115 

Dunlap, Jack— 111,204, 358 

Dunlap, Robert— 69, 200, 218, 358 

Dunn, George — 89, 271 

Dunn, Hilka— 89 

Dunn, Jack — 119, 197, 358 

Dunn, Joe— 112, 358 

Dunn, Ramon — 116 

Dunnan. Neville — 115 

Dunne, Jack— 192, 358 

Dunne, Margery— 155, 183, 275, 358 

Duphorne, Betty — 80, 151, 160, 272, 
358 

Duphorne, June— 89, 130, 134, 309 

Durflinger, Glen — 112, 358 

Durland.M. A.— 49, 94, 216 

Durnil, Ardith— 172, 284, 358 

Durst, Harold— 172, 309 

Dutton, Charles — 75, 358 

Duval, S/Sgt. Raymond — 110 

Duwe, Mildred— 186, 309 

Dwerlkotte, Josenh — 1 16 

Dyck, Erma — 169, 358 

Dyer, Alvah— 113, 358 

Dyer, Herbert — 358 

Dykeman, Joan — 181, 309 



— E — 



Eagleton, Harold— 190, 358 

Earl, John— 83, 309 

Easterlins, Verlin — 146 

Easton, William, Jr. — 197, 309 

Eaton, Edward — 1 1 6 

Eaton, Francis — 309 

Eaton, Frank— 99, 201, 358 

Eaton, Ralph, Jr.— 94, 200, 358 

Eaton, Richard C— 73, 77, 120, 133, 

270 
Ebert, Derry — 358 
Eberwein, Elroy — 82, 358 
Eby, Clifford — 109 
Eckelman, David— 111, 201, 358 
Eckstein, Paul — 80, 147 
Ecord, Joyce— 91, 164, 358 
Eddy, Jean— 275 
Eddy, Virginia— 146, 162, 227, 272, 

358 
Eddy, WilPam — 279. 358 
Edell, Casey— 187, 204, 272, 358 
Edgar, Robert — 358 
Edgerton, Myron — 1 12 
Edmonds, David — 358 
Edmundson, Billy — 358 
Edwards. Bvron — 1 1 2 
Edwards, Charles — 100, 309 
Edwards, Earl, Jr. — 95 
Edwards, Marilyn — 91, 358 
Edwards, Mary— 80, 105, 162, 358 
Edwards, Ray, Jr. — 309 



Edwards, Thornton — 35, 39 

Edwards, William H. — 115 

Edwards, William R. — 75, 80, 186, 358 

Edwards, William W.— 358 

Egan, Joanne— 155, 181, 311 

Eggerman, Dorothy — 184, 227, 311 

Eggerman, John — 116, 197, 358 

Ehret, Delbert — 200, 358 

Ehrsam, Alger — 31 1 

Eichman, Eugene — 155 

Eidson, William — 192, 358 

Eilers, James — 155 

Eis, Virginia — 86, 169 

Eisenhower, Gen. Dwight — 213 

Eisenhower. Milton S. ( Pres. ) — 213, 

216, 265, 299 
Eisenhower, Milton S., Jr. — 115, 155, 

201, 287, 288, 358 
Ekart, William, Jr. — 311 
Ekblad, Bob— 258 
Ekdahl, Inez — 150 
Eklund, Emery — 115 
Eklund, William — 115 
Elam, John, Jr.— 190, 358 
Elbl, William — 101, 311 
Elder, Calvin — 197, 358 
Elling, Homer — 76 
Elliott, Earl — 119, 204, 253, 358 
Elliott, Marjorie— 183, 358 
Elliott. Richard— 109 
Ellis, Dan — 311 
Ellis, Harlan — 108 
Ellis, Roscoe, Jr. — 3 1 1 
Ellis, William— 101 
Ellison, Cozy — 63 
Ellison, John— 188, 358 
Ellison, Louise — 63 
Elmborg, JoAnn — 162, 358 
Elmer, Harold— 86, 201, 311 
Elmer, Charles — 76, 201, 358 
Elswood, Natalie — 106 
Elvin, Leland — 358 
Emme, Louis— 79, 358 
Emery, Walter — 86 

Enders, Paul— 80, 358 

Endsley, Mark— 90, 358 

Engel, Albert— 311 

Engelhardt, Barbara Baker — 121, 185, 
218, 227, 358 

Engelhardt, Wayne — 118, 192, 358 

Enkelken, Edgar— 90, 118, 137, 155, 
199, 358 

Engelland, Charles — 127, 129, 143, 144, 
191,311 

Engelland, Ruth — 145, 162, 311 

Engineering Council — 94 

Engineers' Open House — 92, 93 

Engle, Jane— 36, 162,358 

Engler, James — 359 

Engler, Jean— 80, 160, 227, 359 

Engler, Robert — 311 

English, Anne— 169, 359 

English, William— 97, 155 

Enlow, Walter — 155 

Enrollment — 338, 340 

Epp, Virginia — 130, 181, 311 

Eppinger, Leroy — 311 

Erdwien, Neil — 198. 288, 359 

Erichsen, Evelyn — 160, 359 

Erickson, Neil — 113 

Erickson, Phil— 359 

Erickson, Richard — 87 

Ericson, Clifford — 115, 359 

Ericson, Neil— 204, 359 

Eriksen, Conrad — 88 

Erikson, Twila — 89 

Ernst, F. Gene — 115, 193, 359 

Ernst, Norman — 190, 359 

Ernsting, Louis — 112 

Errebo, William — 116 

Escritt, Genevive — 147 

Eshbaugh, E. L. — 86 

Eshelman, Lt. Col. Dean — 110 

Eslinger, Charles — 90 

Esslinger. James — 79. 116, 195, 359 

Estill, William — 117, 279, 359 

Eta Kanpa Nu — 132 

Euler, Samuel — 112 

Eulert, Arnold— 359 

Evans, Lawrence — 109 

Evans, Marilyn — 185, 359 

Evans, Norma — 149, 151, 184, 359 

Evans, Phyllis— 36, 127, 130, 181, 
301, 311 

Evans, Thomas — 75, 186, 359 
Evermeyer, Harold — 79, 81, 113, 151, 
152, 359 

Everson, Merrill— 99, 359 

Everson, Raymond — 359 

Ewald, Philip— 97, 309 

Ewart, Marjorie — 148, 154, 162, 359 

Ewing. Eugene — 359 

Extension Service — 60. 61 

Eyestone, Melvin — 151, 359 

Eyestone. Sharon — 179. 359 „ „ 

Eyman, Kathleen— 104, 153, 162, 359 



— F — 



Faculty Council on Student Affairs — 39 

Fagan, Veryl — 1 15 

Fagg, Joseph — 99. 205, 359 

Faidley, Karl— 116, 359 



Fairbairn, Leighton — 253, 359 

Fairbanks, Everitt — 155 

Fairbanks, Gustave — 100 

Fairbanks, Lewis — 118, 160 

Faith, Bill— 197, 359 

Falen, Hobart— 77, 311 

Falen, Margene — 84, 279 

Falen, Teddy— 204, 311 

Fangman, Robert — 112 

Fansher, Marvin — 189, 359 

Fansher, Stanley— 82, 133, 195, 255, 

359 
Fanshier, Robert — 224 
Fanshier, Wilbert — 115 
Faris, Marjorie — 105, 147, 162, 359 
Farley, Gerald— 99 
Farm House — 195 
Farmer, Mrs. George — 140, 182 
Farrar, James — 95 
Farrar, Ronald — 112 
Farrell, F. D. — 34 
Farrell, Gail — 118 
Fassett, James — 198, 278, 359 
Fatzer, Elmer — 117, 197, 359 
Fatzer, Kenneth— 83, 116, 197, 359 
Fay, James — 155 
Fayette, Jacqueline — 180, 359 
Fearl, Amy Lou— 185, 359 
Feaster, Max — 112, 197, 359 
Fechner, Karl — 115 
Fedell, Dick— 36, 97, 106, 125, 131, 

132, 311, 312 
Feight. John— 155,359 
Feightner, Chauncy — 359 
Feldner, Robert — 193, 359 
Felix, Ralph— 200, 359 
Felzke, Walter — 359 
Fennema, Owen — 116, 359 
Fenton, Prof. F. C. — 49 
Fenton, Franklin— 101, 131, 192, 311 
Fenton, Jane — 185, 359 
Ferguson, Harvey — 360 
Ferguson, John — 61 
Ferguson, Robert — -360 
Fernkopf, Kenneth — 360 
Fessler, Ruth — 360 
Fetrow, John — 3 1 1 
Fichtner, Henry — 95, 311 
Fiden, William — 84, 146, 360 
Fiehtner, Phyllis — 272, 360 
Field, Ralph— 80, 116, 360 
Fielding. Harold— 117, 201, 360 
Fields, Helen — 63 
Fields, Kenneth — 76, 133 
Fieser, Lorine — 149, 162, 311 
Filinger, George — 77 
Fillmore, Albert — 244, 247 
FinCannon, John — 116 
Finch, Wanda— 360 
Findley, John — 219 
Fine, Phyllis — 153, 179. 360 
Finegan, Richard — 29, 94, 131, 155, 

193, 278, 311 
Finley. Philip — 112 
Finley, Jack — 1 16 
Finley. John — 75, 78, 80, 360 
Finley, Robert — 116, 360 
Finnigin, Famie — 168, 360 
Finof, Bernard — 155, 360 
Finuf, Wilfrid — 155, 360 
Fischer, Edward — 95, 96 
Fischer, John — 155 
Fiser, Bobby — 197, 360 
Fiser, Lud— 136, 216, 217, 247 
Fish, Almon — 63, 77 
Fishburn, Frank — 108 
Fisher, Donald — 81, 88, 360 
Fisher, Jack — 99 
Fisher, Mary — 3 1 1 
Fisher, Ross — 360 
Fitch, Vernon — 1 1 6 
Fitzgerald Donald — 1 19 
Fitzgerald. Lyndell — 119 
Flaherty, Michael — 151, 360 
Flahive, Thomas — 76 
Flanders. John — 1 16 
Flannelly. Bill— 201, 360 
Flannelly, Tom — 201. 360 
Fleener, John — 116. 279, 360 
Fleming, Donald — 76. 133 
Fleming, Jonathan — 80, 147, 360 
.Fleming. William L. — 112 
Flent-e, Donald— 80. 117. 189, 311 
Fletcher, Albert — 202, 360 
Fletcher, Robert — 193, 360 
Flora, Barbara — 186, 360 
Flower. Robert — 113. 198, 360 
Floyd. MacNelly — 148, 360 
Flynn, Joan — 146 
Fobes. Robert — 115, 151, 360 
Foland. Jack — 201. 360 
Folck. Harold— 202. 360 
Folck, Lois— 136, 180. 360 
Folkers, Jo — 172, 360 
Foltz, Eugene — 1 1 5 
Foltz, Louis — 131 
Foltz. Dr. V. O.— 39, 216 
Football— 219-226 
Foote, lohn — 112 
Ford. Don — 36. 37. 64, 68, 106. 127, 

129. 204, 301, 311 
Ford. Kenny — 35 
Ford. Mary— 185. 272, 360 
Ford. Wilbur — 311 
Foreman, Charles — 278, 311 
Foreman Melba — 360 
Forsberg, Leo — 360 



435 



Fortenberry, Jacob— 107, 193, 360 

Foster, Charles — 3 1 1 

Foster, Hugh — 172, 360 

Foster, Jane — 164, 360 

Foster, John — 360 

Foster, Thomas — 274 

Fountaine, F. C. — 82 

Fowler, Brady — 147 

Fowler, Georganne — 127, 169, 311, 320 

Fox, Delia— 91, 169, 227, 360 

Fox, James — 116, 360 

Fox, Wallace — 99 

Frakes, Glenn — 188, 360 

Fralick. Naomi— 169, 227, 272, 311 

Francis, Eugene — -270 

Francis, Horace — 360 

Francis, James — 100, 360 

Francis, Norene— 80, 87, 138, 162, 

272, 311 
Francis, Raymond — 3 1 1 
Francis, Sam — 219 
Frank, Dr. E. R.— 59 
Frank, Joan — 91, 186, 360 
Frank, John W.— 63 
Frankenfield. Justus — 63, 86 
Franklin Edwin — 360 
Franklin. Lyla— 149, 151, 162, 311 
Franklin, Woodrow — 86 
Frankum, Demrie — 360 
Frantz, Kenneth — 74, 311 
Fraser, Ray — 360 
Frazier, John, Jr.— 1 1 1 , 200, 360 
Fredrickson, Lloyd — 112 
Fredrickson, Pauline — 136, 154, 186, 

311 
Fredrickson, Ralph — 191, 311 
Freeby, Fred — 201, 360 
Freed, Gaylord — 1 1 6 
Freed, Robert — 95 
Freedlun, John — 311 
Freeman, E. Roy — 311 
Freeman, Phil — 112, 360 
Freshman Class Officers — 300 
Freshman Counselors — 102 
Freshman Home Economics Club — 105 
Freshman Orientation — 341 
Frey, Muriel — 162, 360 
Frey. Nancy — 185, 360 
Frey, Oma — 149, 151, 162, 360 
Frey, Russell — 113, 192, 361 
Frick, Dr. E. J.— 57 

Frick, Edwina— 91, 153, 183, 227, 361 
Frick, Forris— 90, 94, 136, 202, 361 
Friel, Mrs. Grace — 166 
Friesen, Bernard — 11 
Friesen, Max— 79, 90, 272, 361 
Frisbie, Jeanne — 81. 274, 361 
Frisbie, Russell — 361 
Fritschen, John— 112, 155, 199 
Fr'tzler, Betty — 162, 361 
Frizell, Robert — 75 
Frizzell, Constance — 90, 
Froelich. William— 117 
Frog Club— 91 
Froman. Marilyn — 162, 
Froog, Arthur — 84 
Frost, Howard — 118 
Frownfelter. Dale — 1 1 5 , 
Frye, Martha — 181, 361 
Fryer, Alan — 190, 361 
Fryer, Kathryn — 149, 180, 361 
Fuhrken, Ralph— 191, 274, 275, 311 
Fulcher. Richard — 204, 361 
Fuller, John — 198, 361 
Fuller, Mrs. Lillian B. — 171 
Fuller, Richard— 98, 136, 192, 311 
Fulton, Ernest— 98, 311 
Fultz, Charles — 361 
Fultz, Kenneth — 96, 128, 132, 311 
Funk, John — 118 
Funke, Harry— 155, 202, 361 
Funston, Jules — 88, 204, 311 
Furlong, Virginia— 180, 227, 361 
Furneaux, Raymond — 361 
Furtick, William — 82 
Furumoto, Howard — 89, 109 
Furumoto, Viola — 89 



361 



91, 185, 311 
202, 361 

275, 361 



151 



_G — 



311 



Garher, lst/Sgt. Laren — 110 

Garnand, Bruce — 147, 361 

Garrison, Delia — 3 1 1 

Garrison, Evelyn — 311 

Garrison, Glenn — 1 12 

Garrison, Harold — 361 

Garrison, Margaret — 143 145, 162, 

Garrison, Phil — 148, 205, 361 

Garrison, Roy — 361 

Garton, Chester — 311 

Garver, Barbara — 104, 183, 361 

Garvin, Earl — 94, 155 

Gaskell, Luther — 116, 151, 279 

Gast, Emil — 155, 199, 361 

Gates, Bryan — 83, 112 

Gates, Dell — 86, 311 

Gates, Kathryn — 102, 105, 311 

Gates, Lorn — 361 

Gates, William — 155 

Gatie, Thomas — 86 

Gatz, Calvin — 108 

Gatz, Jerry — 84, 87, 130, 138, 145, 

183, 272, 361 
Gatz, John — 192, 361 
Gatz, Katharine — 184, 313 
Gaughan, Wilbur— 99, 155, 187, 199, 

361 
Gault, Theodore— 100, 361 
Gault, Walter — 116 
Gearhart, Jo Anne — 361 
Gearhart, Marvin — 361 
Gebhart, Raymond — 201, 361 
Gee, Jerry — 79 

Gee, Kathleen— 105, 164, 361 
Gee, Mary — 145, 164, 313 
Gehlbach, Walter— 115 
Gehrke, Duane — 1 16 
Gehrke, Irene — 69, 146, 150, 313 
Gehrke, Thornton — 198, 361 
Geiger, Bill — 218 
Geiger, Willard— 115, 192, 362 
Geist, Eugene — 201, 362 
Gelbart, Nathan — 107 
Gemmell, George — 61 
Gentry, Harold— 113, 362 
Gentry, Maurice — 362 
Georg, Joan — 102, 150, 162, 295, 
George, Donald — 74, 75, 313 
George, Douglas— 80, 189, 313 
George, Louis — 362 
George, Ralph — 114, 362 
George, Raymond — 151, 152, 274, 

362 
Gerard, Donald — 98 
Gerard, Richard — 362 
Gering, Eugene — 88, 362 
Germann, Donald — 115, 

Fred — 78, 81, 

Ralph— 115, 

Rosalie — 81, 



Gaafar, El-Sayed— 63, 89, 311 

Gafford, Lloyd— 97, 132, 311 

Gage, Ardyce — 147, 361 

Gage, Walter — 87, 90, 94, 201, 311 

Gainey, Dr. P. L. — 45 

Galinko. Sidney — 109 

Gallep, Capt. Alfred — 110 

Gamble, Charles — 361 

Gamby, John — 109 

Gamlowski. Joanne — 178, 361 

Gamma Delta — 1 5 

Gandee, Irvine — HI, 132, 204, 278, 

300, 311 
Gantz, Delbert — 116 
Gantz, Jack — 361 
Gantz, Robert — 361 
Garbe, Lloyd— 112, 147 
Gard, John— 111, 203. 361 
Gardiner, William — 112 
Gardner, Daniel — 80, 119, 361 
Gardner, Jack — 216, 228 
Gardner, Judy — 151, 295 
Gardner, Julia— 81, 103, 149, 162, 361 



313 



>79, 



362 
152 
362 
102, 



362 



Germann 
Germann 
Germann, Rosalie — 81, 102, 103, 146, 

152, 362 
Gessell, Dale— 3'62 
Getty, Alfred— 95, 132. 362 
Geyer, Prof Katherine — 45, 91 
G bbs, Shirley — 178, 362 
Gibson, Charles — 113, 201, 362 
Gibson, Esther — 105, 166, 362 
Gibson. Raymond — 101 
Gier. Lucille— 88, 160, 362 
Gier, R-chard— 362 

Gies, Donna— 80, 105, 161, 169, 362 
Gifford, Dorothy— 130, 136, 179, 313 
Gigstad, Alfred— 82, 119, 146, 362 
Gilbaugh, Doris — 362 
Gilbert, Bruce— 114, 201, 362 
Gilbert. Mowry— 80, 112, 151, 272, 

279, 362 
Gilbert, William— 99, 205, 362 
Gilek, Ruth— 145, 181, 272, 362 
Giles. Alma— 63, 135, 313 
Gilkison. Lucile— 167, 313 
G-llan, Dale— 81, 195, 362 
Gillan, Lois — 81, 362 
Gillan, Robert— 201, 362 
Gillenwater, Joe — 79, 362 
Gillespie, Howard — 192, 362 
Gilliland, lames — 362 
Gilliland, Otis— 132, 148, 313 
Gillispie, James — 25 7 
Gillmore, Helen— 81, 153, 362 
Gilman, John — 112 
Gilmore, Edna— 135. 180, 313 
James — 204, 362 
Joe — 74 
M. Virginia— 130, 185, 285, 



Goddard, Laurel — 81, 112, 218 

Godfrey, Beverly— 136, 162, 313 

Godfrey, Dorothy — 313 

Godfrey, G. W.— 194, 313 

Godwin, R. Duane— 83, 112, 362 

Goeken, Marjorie — 168, 362 

Goertzen, Albert — 362 

Goertzen, Betty — 77 

Goertzen, Kenneth — 77, 278, 362 

Goetsch, Dennis — 189, 362 

Goff, John — 114 

Goforth, John — 107 

Golden, Leslie — 188, 362 

Goldsberry, Edward — 77, 362 

Golf — 2 39 

Goller, George — 218, 362 

Golt, Lavern — 100, 362 

Gonzales, Gabriel — 108 

Good, Don — 270 

Good, John — 189. 362 

Good, Laurence — 274 

Goodbar, William — 190, 362 

Goodloe, Leonard — 109, 196, 362 

Goodrich, Arthur — 86 

Goodrich. Keith — 116 

Gore, Lorna — 77, 170, 362 

Gorgas, Ethel — 162, 313 

Goris, Charles— 155, 199, 362 

Gorman, Joseph — 362 

Gorman, Margaret — 363 

Gorman, Richard— 155, 198, 363 

Gorrell, Earl — 363 

Goss, Charles — 97, 132, 304, 313 

Goss, Jo Ann — 180, 317 

Goss, Roy — 147 

Gossett, Alice — 145, 154, 363 

Gotti. Anna — 150, 363 

Gough, Gladys — 39 

Gough, Marvin — 81, 363 

Gough, Walter — 109 

Gould, A. Robert — 80, 112 

Gould, Elizabeth — 162, 363 

Gould, Max — 76, 13 3 

Govell, Earl — 87 

Governor — 3 

Gowell, Earl — 88 

Goyen, Lester — 75, 
152, 363 

Goyen, Loren — 81, 114, 

Graber. Orland — 3 1 3 

Graber, Ruth — 313 

Graduate Club — 63 

Graduate Council — 63 

Graduate School — 62, 63 

Grady, Joseph — 99 

Graff, June— 153, 186, 363 

Graham, Alice — '63 

Gerald — 204. 363 
Jack— 112, 195, 363 
Marjorie — 106 
Ralph — 216. 217 
Roy — 132, 200, 313 
" James— 80, 203, 363 
Ora Mae — 151, 363 



Gilmore, 
Gingrich 
Gingrich 
^ 362 
Gingrich 



R. F— 49 

Giovagnoli, Paul — 97, 131, 313 
Gish, Betty— 183, 313 
Gish, Clarence — 77 
Gish.Norville — 78, 136, 192, 283, 

284. 362 
Gishwiller, Eugene — 128, 313 
Glavinich. Joseph — 313 
Glenn, Charles — 195. 362 
Glenn, John— 155. 199, 362 
Gleue, Richard — 133 
Glotzbach, Betty— 88, 155, 313 
Glotzbach, Charles — 155 
Glotzbach, Mildred — 155 
Glotzbach, Ralph — 88, 155, 199, 
Glover, Carolyn — 103, 186, 362 
Glover, Tack — 115, 201 
Glover, O. B. — 61 
Glover, William — 76, 201, 313 
Glue, Fred — 271 
Gnagy, Laurence — 101 



313 



Groff, Richard — 108, 198, 364 

Grogg, Benjamin — 76, 133, 313 

Groody, Mrs. P.J. — 181 

Grosdidier, Bernard — 155 

Grosdidier, Rosemary — 155, 178, 313 

Gross, Joanne — 162, 364 

Gross, Robert — 364 

Gross, William — 108 

Grote, Lloyd — 151, 313 

Grove, Gwen — 185, 313 

Gruber, John — 81, 155 

Gryskiewicz, Larry — 245, 246, 247 

Guerrant, Mary Jo — 103, 155, 167, 364 

Guerrant, W. U. — 153 

Guest, Loys — 80, 117, 160 

Guhr, Harold — 79 

Guinn, Darwin — 1 1 2 

Guipre. Robert — 96, 204, 313 

Gulley, Carol — 313 

Gulley, Raymond — 77, 313 

Gulley, William — 77, 313 

Gunning, Mary — 104, 162, 364 

Gunter, Lyle — 3 1 3 

Gunter, Mary Gerlach — 185, 362 

Gurtler, Glen — 112 

Gurtler, Homer — 112, 364 

Gurtner, Eugene — 364 

Guthrie, James — 1 1 6 

Gutzman, Gerald — 187, 364 

Gutzman. Robert — 116, 364 

Gwin, Dorothy — 136, 364 

Gwin, Francis — 191, 313 

Gwin, Howard — 364 

Gwin, Paul — 78, 191, 313 

Gwin, Roy — 191, 313 



81, 85, 115, 151, 



151, 363 



104, 
182, 



Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 
Green, 



187, 363 



201, 
117, 



311 
363 



Graham. 
Graham, 
Graham, 
Graham, 
Graham, 
Grandfield, 
Grandfield, 

Grandfield. Virgin : a — 80. 85 
127. 129, 145, 146, 148, 154, 
277. 313, 314 
Grandle, Robert — 114, 188, 363 
Granger. Doris — 145, 149, 151, 180 

363 
Gransberry. James — 200, 363 
Grant, Anita — 164. 363 
Graves, J. Lewis — 363 
Gray, Curtis— 119. 196. 363 
Gray, Donald— 198. 278, 288. 363 
Green. Charles— 155, 192, 363 

Elbert — 74 

Elton — 192. 363 

Tohn R.— 278 

John W.— 94, 96, 278, 311 

Merton — 279 

Susie— 185, 294, 363 

Thayne — 363 

Vera Lou — 180 

Warren — 363 

William — 155, 
Greenawalt, Jack — 87. 
Greene. Laurenz — 363 
Greene, Willard— 363 
Greenough, Jean — 3 1 3 
Greenough, Phyllis — 149 

363 
Greer, Edison — 86 
Gregg, Duane — 202, 363 
Gregory, Lee — 98 
Grene. William — 363 
Grentner, Margaret — 155 
Gress, Georgi — 87, 145 
Gretzinger, James — 101 
Greve, Robert — 112, 363 
Grieshaber, Carl — 193, 363 
Griffee, Dana — 363 
Griffeth, Robert— 114 
Griffin, Mary— 155. 171 
Griffing, Richard — 201, 363 
Griffith, Edwin— 101, 363 
Griffith, Toan — 180, 363 
Griffith, Mary Jo — 155, 186 
Griffith, Paul— 61 
Griffith, William— 203, 363 
Grimes, Tames — 200, 219, 222, 364 
Grimes, William — 200, 364 
Grimwood, Lee — 364 
Grissom, Garth — 115, 279, 364 
Grittman, William — 193, 364 
Groberg, Donna — 167, 364 
Groff, Jack— 108 



151, 183, 



186, 363 
183, 272, 363 
363 



363 



— H — 



Haag, Donna Lou — 172, 364 

Haas, Harry — 1 15 

Haase, H. J.— 364 

Habig, Jack — 205, 364 

Habr, Frank — 364 

Hacker, Herman — 155 

Hackney, Blair — 76. 192, 364 

Hackney, Janey— 81, 138, 151, 162, 

284, 300, 313 
Haddock, Dean — 80, 90, 118, 189, 364 
Hadley, James— 96, 128, 131, 132, 313 
Hadley, Phyllis — 177, 180, 364 
Haflich, Neil — 101, 364 
Hagan, James — 364 
Hagans, Anita — 172, 364 
Hagans, Jean — 183, 364 
Hagans, Robert — 200, 364 
Hageman, Joy — 272, 364 
Hagerud, Mary — 275 
Hague, Darilene — 104, 161, 171, 227, 

313 
Hahn, Robert — 94, 95, 112, 364 
Haines, Charles — 112, 364 
Haines, Margaret — 63 
Hakanson, Flarold — 364 
Halbower, Charles — 192, 272, 313 
Halbower, Jane — 185, 364 
Halbower, Lorraine — 179, 364 
Hale, Edward— 364 
Hale, Patricia — 105, 178, 364 
Hale, William — 118, 364 
Hall, Charles — 108, 188, 364 
Hall. Gloria — 172, 364 
Hall, Graces — 162, 364 
Hall, T. L.— 137 
Hall, John— 112, 197, 364 
Hall, Laurence — 364 
Hall, Mary — 364 
Hall, Mildred — 102, 129, 135, 181, 

300, 313 
Hall, Phyllis— 104, 172, 364 
Hall. Rex — 364 
Hall, Robert— 200, 259, 364 
Halstead, Mrs. O. H. — 199 
Hamasu. Masao — 89, 364 
Hamer, Dorothy — 162 
Hamilton, Barbara — 186, 364 
Hamilton, Dallas — 205, 364 
Hamilton, Dorothy — 89, 164, 364 
Hamilton, Franklin — 151, 152, 364 
Hamilton, Gilbert — 79 
Hamilton, Kenneth — 364 
Hamilton, Robert — 101, 364 
Hamilton, Roger — 74, 270 
Hamilton, Sidney — 132, 204, 365 
Hamlin, Frank — 97, 132, 313 
Hamlin, Howard — 88, 136, 313 
Hammarlund, Marion — 115, 146, 150, 

365 
Hammeke, Alice— 179, 365 
Hammerli, Donald — 313 
Hammond, Clarice — 153, 164, 313 
Hammond, Edna — 87, 183, 313 
Hammond, Helen — 153, 164, 272, 365 
Hampl, Delmar — 1 12 
Hampl, Eldon— 99, 365 
Hampton, Peter — 119, 193, 365 
Hancock, Albert— 111, 198, 272, 365 
Handlin, Dale— 81, 112. 365 
Handlin, Lloyd— 99, 112, 365 
Haney. Bob — 203, 365 
Haney, Lee — 1 16 
Hanlon, Nancy — 155, 183, 365 
Hanly, Jeanne— 138, 181, 313 



436 



136, 192, 229, 



315 
274, 275, 



Hanna, Raymond — 202, 365 

Hansen, Enas— 80, 182, 313 

Hansen, Franklin — 365 

Hansen, Joyce; — 104, 168, 365 

Hansen, Lillian — 186, 365 

Hansen, lst/Sgt. Lloyd — 110 

Hansen, Norman — 205, 365 

Hansen, Reeva — 365 

Hansen, William — 80, 112, 365 

Hanson, Charles — 99 

Hanson, Kenneth — 100, 365 

Hanson, Paul — 95 

Hanson, Richard — 100, 253, 365 

Hanson, Richard H.— 96, 112, 198, 

313 
Harbecke, Mary Ann — 106 
Harbert, Glen — 107. 151, 189, 365 
Hardenburger, William — 1 16 
Harder, Alice — 164, 365 
Hardin, Eleanor — 148, 154, 227 
Harding, Betty J. — 148, 151, 154, 170, 

365 
Harding, Mrs. Eura — 185 
Harding, Warren — 79, 365 
Hardy, Mrs. Cleo C. — 178 
Hardy, .Frances E. — 180, 365 
Hardy, Richard — 94 
Hare, Charles — 95, 277, 365 
Hare, Jean — 111, 365 
Hare, Wendell— 365 
Hargas, John — 108 
Harger, Patricia— 162, 215, 365 
Hargis, Jeannette — 153, 186, 365 
Harkins, Dale — 192, 365 
Harkness, Kenneth — 80, 116, 365 
Harlan, J. V. — 112, 365 
Harlin, Harriet — 63 
Harman, Carolyn — 365 
Harman, Richard — 1 12 

233, 251, 365 
Harman, Walter — 203, 315 
Harmon, Jack— 97, 131, 132, 202, 315 
Harmon, Julius — 99 
Haron, Albert — 84, 89, 97, 
Harper, Jeanette — 134, 365 
Harper, William — 95, 203, 

365 
Harr, Don — 249 
Harr, Joan — 170, 365 
Harrar, Robert— 203, 365 
Harris, Clifford — 365 
Harris, Dale — 119, 365 
Harris, John — 365 
Harris, Rilla— 180, 365 
Harris, Samuel — 75, 79, 
Harris, Wallace — 116 
Harris, Wayne — 115 
Harris, William G. — 108 
Harrison, Frank — 366 
Harrison, George — 366 
Harrison, Joann — 272, 315 
Harrison, Pearl — 81. 85, 162, 
Harrison, Robert— 63, 96, 132, 
Harrison, Walter — 366 
Harrold, Leland — 366 
Harshbarger, Frank — 95, 366 
Hart. John — 78, 109, 188, 366 
Hart. Marilyn — 366 
Hart, Raymond — 188, 366 
Hart, William— 99, 188. 315 
Hart, Willis — 101, 201, 366 
Hartford, John — 366 
Hartman, Edna — 80, 182, 366 
Hartman, Myrna — 366 
Hartman, Norma — 178, 366 
Hartman, Stuart — 112, 192, 366 
Harts, Roger — 112 
Hartung, Kenneth— 80. 116. 366 
Hartwell, Richard— 15 5, 192, 366 
Harvey, Roy — 29, 200. 315 
Harwood, Mary Lou — 91, 185, .366 
Haskett. William— 73, 74, 315 
Hatch, Walter — 115 
Hatcher, Kathryn — 164, 274. 366 
Hatcher, Robert— 79. 187, 200, 253, 

366 
Hatcher, Wayne — 366 
Hatesohl, Delmar — 366 
Hatfield, Charles — 366 
Hathaway, Raymond — 80, 366 
Hauber, Edmond — 200, 366 
Haughey, Mrs. Elizabeth — 30 
Hauserman, William — 90, 272. 366 
Havel, Kenneth — 77, 366 
Haverkamp, Clarence — 79, 3 66 
Hawes, Averil — 80, 103. 167, 366 
Hawkins, Hal — 202, 366 
Hawkinson, Lauranell — 179. 272, 366 
Hawley, Richard — 366 
Hawley, Vivian — 105. 272, 315 
Haworth. Wayne — 278 
Hay. 1 aVern — 76 
Hay, Willa— 105, 366 
Hayden. William — 115. 146. 366 
Hayes, Beverly — 130, 186, 315 
Hayes, Donald — 366 
Hayes, Lewis — 366 
Haylett, Ward— 25 3 
Haylett, Ward. Ir. — 131, 192, 366 
Haymaker, H. H. — 216 
Haynes, Loren — 198, 366 
Hays, Jack — 366 
Hays. Robert — 84. 315 
Hayward. Jack — 80, 114, 274, 366 
Hazlett, Floyd — 99, 366 
Head, Edward — 116, 237 
Headrick, Clyde— 116 



189, 270, 366 



366 
315 



162, 315 

131, 132, 150, 



315 



Heath, Clarence — 136, 191, 219, 223, 

315 
Heaton, James — 138, 198, 272, 366 
Hecht, Roger — 78, 172, 315 
Hecht, Wilbert— 366 
Heckathorn, Cliff— 99, 25 7, 366 
Heckert, William — 366 
Heckethorn, Elizabeth — 149, 151, 366 
Heckler, Robert — 187, 202, 366 
Heckman, Elizabeth — 85 
Heckman, Henry — 366 
Heddens, Kimber — 115, 192, 366 
Hedgecock, Jackson — 128, 160, 315 
Hedlund, Gene — 275 
Hedman, Phillip — 77, 366 
Hedstrom, Edwin — 112, 366 
Heffelbower, Dwight — 101 
Hefley, Floyd— 366 
Hefty, Glenn — 112 
Heggy, Betty— 84, 148, 315 
Heggy, Compton — 95, 148, 315 
Heikes, Duane — 115, 366 
Heikes, Norma — 146, 170, 366 
Heikes, Robert — 367 
Heim, Robert — 99, 116, 367 
Heinze, Charles — 202, 367 
Heise, Harold — 74,80, 118, 155, 367 
Heise, Richard — 367 
Heiser, Dean — 99 
Helander, Prof. Linn — 49 
Held, Norman — 81, 112, 203, 367 
Helfrey, Jean — 155, 
Heline, Ada — 150 
Heline, Robert — 96, 

192, 367 
Heliums, Nancy — 163, 367 
Helm, Prof. John — 279 
Hemenway, Keith — 201, 367 
Hemphill, Donald — 83 
Hemphill, John — 97, 315 
Hemphill, Toy — 148 
Hemphill, Richard — 117, 200, 367 
Hemphill, Robert L. — 279, 367 
Hemphill, Russell — 315 
Henderson, Harold — 109 
Henderson, Joe; — 192, 367 
Henderson, Miles — 367 
Hendricks, David — 1 16 
Hendricks, James — 190, 367 
Hendrickson, Ruby — 315 
Hengel, Raymond — 155, 367 
Henning, Lowell — 120 
Henningson, Irene — 150, 178, 367 
Hennon, Helen — 274, 315 
Henre, Martha — 149, 151, 180, 367 
Henrichs, Bill— 367 
Henricks, Dennis — 88, 
Henrickson, Ha — 367 
Henry, Edwin — 367 
Henry, Janet — 367 
Henry, Joan— 184, 367 
Hensel, Alberta— 172. 367 
Henson, Dorothy — 154, 169 
Henson, Mary — 138, 181, 272, 285, 

288, 367 
Hepler, John — 15 3, 367 
Hering, Robert — 112 
Herpich, Russell — 100 
Herpich, Theresa — 88. 106 
Herr. Gordon— 117. 192, 218, 
Herrick, Carol — 182, 
Herrick, Charles — 74, 
Herrick. David — 109 
Hertel, Robert — 197, 367 
Herwig, Robert — 202, 367 
Heskett, Robert — 116. 367 
Hess, Hazen — 88. 115, 189. 
Hess, Marvin — 367 
Hess, Wilbur — 367 
Hesterman, Vernon — 115, 279, 367 
Heter, Carol — 127, 135. 185. 315 
Heter. Leslie — 279, 367 
Heter, Thomas — 203, 367 
Hetzler, Dorothy — 106 
Hewitt, George — 272. 367 
Hewson, Kenneth — 96 
Hewson. Mary — 315 
Hiatt, John — 367 
Hibbard, J. O.— 86. 117, 367 
Hickert, Emory — 155 
Hickey, Robert — 367 
Hickock, Annabel — 163, 367 
Hicks, Jerry — 367 
Hicks, Merle — 83, 205, 367 
Hidayatullah, Khan — 89, 315 
Hiefner, Bill — 205, 367 
Higgason, Dillon — 79. 112 
Higgins, Rosalie — 163, 367 
Hilbert, Willia — 112 
Hildenbrand, Arthur — 136, 150, 204, 

253, 368 
Hilgendorf. Rolland — 368 
Hill. Donald — 202, 368 
Hill, Donna — 105, 151, 163, 
Hill, Harold — 96. 315 
Hill, Harriet— 1 16. 170, 368 
Hill, Prof.Howard — 45. 144 
Hill, Tames— 114 
Hill, Tarvis— 83, 315 
Hill, Teannine — 295. 368 
Hill, Terome — 96 
Hill, Jewell — 154. 163. 368 
Hill, Tohn — 115, 198, 368 
Hill, Neva — 368 
Hill, Raymond — 109 
Hill, Shirley— 185, 285, 288, 
Hillabrant, James — 99 



315 
315 



367 



256, 367 



368 



368 



Hillel Foundation — 84 

Hillerman. John— 77, 315 

Hillhouse, Arville — 368 

Hills, Dale — 368 

Hills, Mrs. W. H. — 168 

Hills Heights — 168 

Hillstron, Wilfred — 96, 368 

Hilt, Billy — 79, 116, 368 

Hinds, Carolyn— 87, 183, 368 

Hines, Gerald — 95 

Hines, Harold — 203, 315 

Hinkhouse, Betty— 103, 186, 288, 568 

Hinman, Clyde — 101, 131, 137, 151, 

152, 315 
Hinrichs. Robert— 114, 198, 368 
Hinton, John — 109 
Hires, Gerald — 114, 274 
Hiser, Arthur— 101, 315 
Hiskett, Anna — 368 
Hite, Lewis — 368 
Hix, Margaret — 163, 368 
Hix, Mary — 102. 163, 368 
Hixon, Harry — 112, 187, 201, 368 
Hoath, James — 63 
Hobson, L. S. — 49 
Hochmuth, Grace — 63 
Hochuli, Wayne— 315 
Hodgell, Murlin — 278 
Hodges, Jack — 368 
Hodgson, Joe — 100, 131, 187, 205, 

218, 272, 315 
Hodgson, Mary — 261 
Hodgson, Robert — 109, 368 
Holder, Margaret — 103, 368 
Hoefer, Jack— 96, 131, 132, 278, 315 
Hoel, William — 368 
Hoferer, Geroge — 194, 368 
Hoff, Donald — 205, 218, 368 
Hoffman, Allen— 315 
Hoffman, Fred— 80, 368 
Hoffman, Henry — 63 
Hoffmans, Frank — 98 
Hofman, Jack — 112, 368 
Hofman, Marvin — 368 
Hofsess, Jo— 84, 89, 130, 147, 185, 

368 
Hogan, Willard— 368 
Hogg, Alex — 109 
Hogg, Donald — 368 
Hogg, Raymond — 368 
Hoglund, Harold — 368 
Hogue, Norman — 1 1 2 
Hoke, Larry — 115 
Holcombe, Barbara — 151, 160, 368 
Holden, John — 80, 116, 368 
Holder, Duane— 116, 219, 245, 247, 

368 
Holder, Ray— 219, 247, 368 
Holeman, Allen — 368 
Holland, 1st Sgt. Kenneth — 110 
Hollecker, Jeanne — 155, 164, 315 
Hollenback, James— 118, 201, 368 
Holliday, Darwin — 114 
Hollinger, Max — 368 
Holloway, George — 191, 368 
Holloway, John — 96. 279, 368 
Holm, Corrine— 138, 183, 368 
Holman, Tames — 160, 368 
Holmes, Barbara — 134, 164, 368 
Holmes, Daniel — 15 5 
Holmes, Robert — 117, 198, 368 
Holmes, Lemuel — 109, 368 
Holmes, Richard — 197. 368 
Holmes, W. Ernest — 101, 188, 368 
Holmgren, Jean — 154, 186, 285, 288, 

315 
Holsan, Vlasta — 63 
Holt, Carl— 97, 198, 279, 315 
Holwick, Roy — 368 

Home Economics Executive Council — 102 
Home Economics Nursing Club — 105 
Home Economics Publicity Club — 104 
Home Economics Radio Club — 103 
Home Economics Service Club — 104 
Homier, Robert — 188, 368 
Hommon, Raymond — 98. 315 
Honeyman, Allen — 81, 368 
Honeywell. Jay — 116, 193, 369 
Honstead, Herndon — 109, 369 
Honstead, John — 94, 101,315 
Honstead, Marjorie — 104, 315 
Honstead, William — 45, 49, 135 
Hoober, Glen — 369 
Hooker. Richard — 115 
Hooper, Bradley — 1 1 2 
Hoover, Prof. Earl — 126, 266 
Hoover, Neva — 369 
Hoover, Vernon — 83, 192, 315 
Hope, Mary — 163, 315 
Hopkins, Dewi— 96. 315 
Hopkins, Donald — 81, 82, 115, 195. 

369 
Hopkms, Doris — 105. 163, 369 
Hopkins, Vernice — 369 
Hoppas, Ellen — 369 
Horan, Cornelius — 108 
Hornbaker, Donald — 369 
Horticulture Club — 7" 
Horton, Loren — 369 
Horton, William — 88, 151. 315 
Hoskins. Herbert — 80. 112, 189, 369 
Hospitality Days — 70 
Hospitality Days Steering Committee — 

103 
Hostetter, Helen — 104, 1.34 
Harris, F. M.— 30 
Hostetter, Morris — 119 



Hotchkiss, Robert — 369 

Hottman, Calvin — 369 

Houghton, Clifford — 75, 81, 195, 369 

Houghton, William — 117, 369 

Houk, Darrell — 81, 112 

Houk, Gerald — 204, 369 

House, Robert — 94, 369 

House of Williams — 172 

Housholdc-r, Darwin — 79, 369 

Houston, David — 1 1 2 

Howard, Ben — 1 14 

Howard, Claude — 187, 198, 315 

Howard, Denton — 198, 315 

Howard, Joe — 77 

Howard, Shelton — 83, 198, 369 

Howard, Virginia — 135, 171, 315 

Howe, Glenn — 369 

Howe, Dean Harold — 39, 63 

Howe, Virginia — 138 

Howell, Helen — 179, 369 

Howell, James — 369 

Howell, Jean — 227, 369 

Howell, Sam — 114 

Howell, Vernon — 3 69 

Howell, Wilbur — 75, 78, 315 

Howenstine, Elaine — 186, 276, 369 

Howenstine, Robert — 198, 369 

Howes, Merle — 79. 195, 369 

Howey, Harold — 203, 237, 315 

Howland, Shannon — 204, 369 

Howley, Robert — 155, 172, 369 

Hover, Gary — 115 

Hoyer. William — 369 

Hoyt, Carol— 81, 105, 149, 151, 163, 

369 
Hruska, Phillip — 155 
Huber, Bernard — 369 
Huber, Samuel — 100 
Huddleston, Ann — 36, 127, 186, 304, 

315 
Huddleston, Norma — 186, 227, 369 
Huddleston, Paul — 275 
Huddleston, Willa— 315 
Hudelson. John — 109, 198, 315 
Hudelson, Robert — 198, 288, 369 
Hudgens, Henry — 75 
Hudson, Glenn — 101 
Hudson, T. C. — 315 
Hueben, "Donald — 198, 288, 369 
Huenefeld, Tohn — 89, 115, 202. 369 
Huff, Charles — 79 
Huffington, Bonnie — 147 
Hug, Norman — 1 1 5 
Hughbanks, Woodard — 112, 369 
Hughes, Bruce — 201. 369 
Hughes, Clinton — 116, 369 
Hughes, Dewey — 369 
Hughes, John — 114, 274 
Hughs, John — 87. 151 
Hub'ngs, Mark — 200, 317 
Hull, Phil— 78. 369 
Hull, Robert— 115 
Hull. William — 116, 201, 369 
Hume, Robert — 317 
Humes. Richard — 317 
Hummel, R. Jean — 63 
Humphreys, Tames — 369 
Hund, Charles — 79, 155, 199, 317 
Hundlve, William — 80. 1 T 9, 369 
Hunt, Elizabeth — 169, 370 
Hunt, Francis — 82 
Hunt. John— 155, 370 
Hunt, Kenneth — 1 11. 201, 370 
Hunt, Nancy — 185, 317 
Hunt, Ralph — 116 
Hunter. Charles — 109 
Hurd. Fhillip — 100, 194, 370 
Hurd, Robert — 75. 80. 370 
Hurst, Marian — 163. 370 
Hurst. William — 90. 204, 370 
Hus, Tanice — 169, 370 
Hus, Richard — 99, 112. 370 
Huston, G. Dewey — 101. 201, 370 
Hutchins. Max — 87, 88, 96. 370 
Hutchinson, Colonel. A. E. — 45, 110, 121 
Hutchinson. Ira — 196. 370 
Hutton Billy — 317 
Hyde, Emma — 147 






Ibarguen, Luis — 89. 370 

Ice, John — 279. 370 

Lams, Don — 76, 200. 370 

Iiams, Kenneth — 200. 370 

Ilsley, Carol — 1S4, 370 

Imel, Arleigh — 204. 370 

Imel. Clarence — 75. 90. 155, 317 

Imel. Sara — 163, 370 

Imhof. Leonard — 98. 317 

Imler. Marjorie— 179. 272. 370 

Immenschuh. Max — SS, 155 

Industrialist — 279 

Ingenthron. Marcia — 182, 370 

Ingenthron, Thomas — 155, 370 

Inskeep, Richard — 155 

Institute of Radio Engineers — 96 

Interfraternity Council — 187 

Interfraternity Pledge Council — 1 87 

Ireland. Robert — 370 

Irick, Harold — 370 

Irish. Betty — 317 

Irish. Kent — 74. 87, 317 

Irvine, James — 155, 201, 370 



437 



Irvine, Paul — 115, 155 
Irwin, Donna — 169, 370 
Isaacson, Walter — 198, 317 
Ives, Robert — 136, 247 



— J 



Jaber, Jalal— 89, 100,370 

Jacka, Mary — 106 

Jackson, Andrew — 63, 196, 317 

Jackson, Arlie — 194, 370 

Jackson, Betty — 128, 317 

Jackson, Clarice — 370 

Jackson, Donald — 109, 144, 155, 187, 

196,370 
Jackson, Mrs. James A. — 204 
Jackson, Leon — 96 
Jackson, Robert — 317 
Jacobs, Arthur, Jr. — 82, 270, 317 
Jacobs, Bobby — 155, 200, 370 
Jacobs, Charles — 74, 317 
Jacobs, Clinton— 75, 79, 370 
Jacobs, Frank, Jr. — 370 
Jacobs, Irven — 317 
Jacobs, Joan— 161, 167, 370 
Jacobs, Myra — 370 
Jacobs, Robert — 317 
Jacobs, Stanley — 107 
Jacobs, Victor — 155, 370 
Jacobs, Winona — 317 
Jacobson, Byron — 370 
Jacobson, Donald — 80, 82, 155 
Jacobson, Glen — 205, 317 
Jacques. Robert— 114, 151, 160, 370 
Jaedicke, Eugene — 96, 151, 370 
Jagger, Sidney — 73, 90, 370 
James, Elden — 203, 370 
James, Louis — 370 
James, Stephen — 98, 317 
James, Thomas — 77, 271, 370 
Jameson, Earl — 112, 370 
Janke, Raymond — 317 
Janne, Everett — 77, 150 
Jansen, Edward — 155 
Jansen, Robert- — 1 14 
Janssen, Vernon — 148, 317 
Tanzen, John — 1 14 
Jaranilla, Ramon — 63, 89, 317 
Jared, Marvin — 109 
Jarrell, Earl— 200, 370 
Jefferson, Thomas — 153 
Jeffery, Gilbert— 188, 370 
Jeffries, JoAnn — 88. 130, 179, 317 
Jenkins, Emma — 370 
Jenkins, Frank, Jr. — 99 
Jenkins, Georgeanne — 179, 317 
Jennings, Dana — 135, 278 
Jennings, David — 205. 370 
Jennings, Harry, Jr. — 205, 370 
Jennings, Mary Frances — 185, 227, 288, 

317 
Jennison, Kenneth — 370 
Tennison, I eonard — -317 
Jensen, E. Don — 151, 370 
Tensen, E. Lew — 151, 370 
Jensen, Kresten — 188, 370 
Jensen, Marvin — 317 
Jepsen, Richard — 75, 78, 117, 370 
lett, Harold — 188, 370 
Jett, Margaret — 103, 179, 227, 272, 

371 
Jewell, James — 109 
Jewell, Sarah — -371 
Jewett, Arthur — 88, 371 
Tewett. Frances — 185, 371 
Tilka, Bernard — 88. 155. 199, 279, 371 
Jilka, Laurence — 155. 199, 317 
Tinkins. Mary — 181, 371 
Tirik, Dale — 371 
Tohn, Robert — 116. 371 
Johnson, Arvilla — 136. 153. 183, 371 
Johnson, Bernard — 201, 218, 371 
Johnson, Billy — 77 
Johnson, Calvin E. — 101, 317 
Johnson, Calvin H. — 116 
Johnson, Carl E. — 86, 371 
Johnson, Carl W., Jr. — 371 
Tohnson, Dana — 371 
Johnson, Dick— 116, 237, 371 
Johnson, Earl — 1 1 6 
Tohnson, Ellen — 80, 169 
Johnson, Eli — 96, 317 
Johnson, Georgia — 185, 227, 317 
Johnson, Gerald — 114 
Johnson, Gordon — 112, 371 
Johnson, Harold — 201, 371 
Johnson, H. Dale — 81. 371 
Johnson, I. Harold — 61 
Tohnson, Kenneth — 371 
Johnson, La Verne — 88, 150, 371 
Johnson, Leonard B., Jr. — 371 
Johnson, Leonard D. — 317 
Johnson, Lewis — 134, 317 
Johnson, Lois — 275 
Johnson, Lyle — 114, 371 
Johnson, Margaret — 150, 371 
Johnson, Martha — 371 
Johnson, Maurice — 100, 172 
Johnson, Maurine — 317 
Johnson, Mildred — 105, 371 
Johnson, Nathan — 196, 371 
Johnson, Norman E. — 90, 204, 371 
Johnson, Norman W. — 81, 371 
Johnson, Oscar, Jr. — 112 



Johnson, Paul A. — 98, 317 
Johnson, Paul S. — 194, 371 
Johnson, Phyllis — 86, 185, 218, 300, 

371 
Johnson, Raymond — 317 
Johnson, Richard — 193, 371 
Johnson, Robert — 233, 371 
Johnson, Roger — 371 
Johnson, Thayne — 115 
Johnson, Vernell — 196, 371 
Johnson, Vonda — 371 
Johnson, Wendell — 82, 83, 317 
Tohnson, Wesley — 371 
Johnson, Wilber — 146, 150, 371 
Johnson, William — 371 
Johnson, W. Wayne — 205, 371 
Johnson, Willie— 317 
Johnston, Ada — 163, 371 
Johnston, Frederick — 96, 128, 317 
Johnston, Ira — 112, 371 
Johnston, Mildred — 163, 371 
Tohnston, William G. — 201, 371 
Johnston, William R.— 1 16, 204, 371 
Jolly, Marguerite — 168, 272, 371 
lolly, Merrill — 372 
Jolly, Samuel, Jr. — 101, 196, 372 
Jones, A. R. — 34 
Jones, Clarence, Jr. — 112, 372 
Jones, Clarissa — 372 
Jones, Edwin — 116, 372 
Jones, Elmer— 86, 101, 128, 317 
Jones, Emma Jean — 184, 317 
Tones, Floyd — 95, 372 
Jones, George — 82, 83, 191, 317 
Jones, Harry, Jr. — 74 
Jones, Howard — 107, 372 
Jones, Jack — 203, 372 
Jones, John, Jr. — 95, 317 
Jones, Kenneth — 81, 112 
Jones, Lois — 163. 372 
Jones, Marilyn — 102, 104, 163, 227, 

372 
Jones, Norma — 138, 181, 317 
Jones, Paul — 372 
Jones, Rolland — 81, 204, 372 
Jones, Robert— 372 
Jones, Russell A. — 202, 372 
Jones, Russell E. — 372 
Tones, Stanley — 372 
Jones, Ted — 96, 204, 278, 317 
Jones, Thayne — 115, 372 
Jones, Victor — 220, 221 
Tones, William — 112 
Jordan, James — 95, 204, 372 
Jordan, John — 188, 372 
Jordan, Juanita — 106 
Torgenson, L. M. — 131 
Jorgenson, Paul — 98, 131, 187, 203, 

317 
Joslin, Eugene- — 138 
Junior A. V.M.A. — 107, 108, 109 
Judging Teams — 270, 271 
Juhlin, Deane — 86, 372 
Junghans. Harley — 72, 372 
Junior Class Officers — 300 



— K 



Kaaz, Kerwin — 115, 372 

Kabance, Daryl — 372 

Kahl, Donna — 130, 136, 163, 227, 372 

Kahle, Jack— 1 1 2 

Kansas Magazine — 279 

Kansas State Entomoloeical Club — 86 

Kansas State Masonic Club — 87 

Kaiser, Charles — 101 

Kale, Alton — 74 

Kale, Gerald— 115, 372 

Kamal, Adel— 86. 89. 372 

Kamm, Enfield — 99, 112, 372 

Kappa Alpha Psi — 196 

Kappa Beta — 149 

Kappa Delta — 184 

Kappa Kappa Gamma — 185 

Kappa Phi — 149 

Kappa Sigma — 197 

Karlin. Marne — 100, 155, 372 

Karls, Robert — 155 

Karns, Bruce — 1 1 6 

Kaspar, Pobert — 372 

Kastens, Bernard — 81, 112, 372 

Kastl, Don — 372 

Kastrup, Joanne — 180, 372 

Katz, Lois — 372 

Katz, William — 202, 372 

Kaucher. Karl — 372 

Kauffeld, Norbert— 86 

Kauffman, Kenneth — 372 

Kaufman Milo — 99 

Kaufman. Victor — 84 

Kaump, Mabel — 128 

Kaup Charles — 116, 201, 372 

Kay, Edw'n— 108, 189, 372 

Kays, David — 116, 193, 274, 372 

Kays Fred, Jr.— 101, 128, 155, 317 

Keas, Roberta — 80, 146. 147, 163, 372 

Keas, Warden — 274, 372 

Keast, Donald — 189, 372 

Keast, Glenn — 76, 112, 189, 372 

Keast, Wayne— 79, 189, 372 

Keating, Bernard — 116, 155, 172 

Keck, Lee — 284 ,372 

Kee, Wesley — 372 

Keech, Elmer — 372 



Keech, Lola— 80, 105, 163, 372 

Keegan, Robert — 155, 199, 372 

Keena, Jimmie — -202, 372 

Keener, Robert — 194, 372 

Keeshan, Marilyn— 81, 105, 149, 151, 

272,372 
Keesling, Maxine — 80, 88, 177, 178, 

227, 288, 317 
Keeten, Joan — 163, 372 
Keeth, Allan — 192, 372 
Keeton, Glenn — 194, 372 
Kehmeier, Keith — 88, 191. 317 
Keif, Rodney — 198, 278, 288, 373 
Keigwin, Thomas — 373 
Keim, Milton — 79, 373 
Keim, Mrs. L.— 169 
Keim's Kabana — 169 
Keiswetter, Enid — 80, 102, 103, 167, 

373 
Keith, Allis— 317 
Keith, Dave — 115, 193, 373 
Keith, E. T. — 134, 180, 279 
Keith, Jane — 105. 163, 373 
Kellenbarger, Frank — 373 
Keller, Carl— 115, 194, 373 
Keller, Harley — 115, 373 
Keller, Raymond — 172 
Keller, Ward— 36, 129, 131, 132, 193, 

317 
Keller, Warren — 133, 136 
Keller, William — 373 
Kelley, Herbert — 373 
Kelley, Wendell — 109 
Kelling, Ruth — 80, 147, 182, 227, 373 
Kellogg, Barbara— 138, 186, 285, 288, 

317 
Kelly, Betty — 184, 373 
Kelly, Paul — 155, 191. 272, 275, 373 
Kelly, Robert — 218, 373 
Kelly, Willis— 30 
Kelsey, Oren — 109 
Kelsey, Richard — 373 
Kemler, Arden — 108 
Kempton, Clayton — 373 
Kempton, Donna — 373 
Kempton, Jean — 163, 373 
Kenagy, Cecil — 373 
Kendall, Howard — 83, 112 
Kennedy, Karen — 180, 373 
Kennedy, Kathlyn— 81, 149, 151, 164 

373 
Kennedy, Ruth — 146, 373 
Kenney, Eugene — 101, 155, 274, 275, 

373 
Kepley, Jane — 317 
Kerbs, Alice— 105. 272, 373 
Kerby, William — 197, 373 
Kerchner, Russell — 132 
Kern, Dayton — 117 
Kern, Eugene — 76, 117, 201, 373 
Kerr, Kathleen — 266 
Kerr, Rolland — 114, 373 
Ketterman, Anne — 149, 151 
Ketterman, Marjorie — 227, 373 
Ketterman, William — 101, 131, 137, 

151, 152, 259, 317 
Kettle. Fred — 116, 373 
K-Fraternity — 136 
KMd, Irma Tean— 80, 147 
Kidd, Marybelle — 147 
Kidd, Wallace— 196, 373 
Kieffer, Lois — 227 
Kieffer, Raymond — 96 
Kier, Charlie— 243, 245, 247 
Kiger, Darrell — 109 
Kilian, James — 118, 373 
Kilkenny, James — 88, 155, 192, 319 
Kilmartin, Ronald — 112, 373 
Kilmer, Milton — 88, 319 
Kilroy, Oswald III — 117 
Kimbell, Gwyn— 185, 227, 373 
Kimmel, Robert — 114, 218, 373 
Kincheloe, Jack — 197, 373 
Kindel, James — 373 
K ; ndred, Ruth — 63 
King, Allen — 373 
King, A. R.— 98, 373 
King, Barbara B. — 145, 146, 181, 272, 

285, 288, 373 
King, Barbara Lee — 186, 373 
King, Hiram — 1 16 
King, Dr. H. H. — 45 
King, Keith— 109, 373 
King, Larry — 220 
King, Lawrence — 111, 136, 191, 219, 

319 
King, Martha — 147 
King, Robert— 90, 373 
King, Roberta— 272, 373 
King, Roy— 374 
King, Shirley— 186, 218, 227, 261, 271, 

272, 374 
Kinnamon, Lynn — 374 
Kinsey, Barbara — 184, 374 
Kinsey. Frankl ; n — 100 
Kiper, Donald— 100, 374 
Kipfer, Mrs. Olive — 189 
Kipp, William, Jr.— 319 
Kirby. Nadine— 164, 374 
Kirgis, Robert — 116, 204, 374 
Kirkeminde, James — 75, 81, 189, 374 
Kirkeminde. William — 109 
Kirkendall, Kenneth — 119, 151, 152, 

374 
Kirkendall, V. S.— 80, 88, 160, 319 
Kirkpatrick, Hugh — 101, 203, 319 
Kirkpatrick, Robert — 201, 374 



Kirsch, Robert — 155 

Kiser, Corliss — 114, 191, 374 

Kiser, David — 279 

Kiser, Harold— 88, 136, 191, 251, 253, 

319 
Kish, Roy — 374 
Kisner, Vernon — 1 1 5 
Kissick, Delberta — 374 
Kissick, Jacquelyn — 374 
Kitchen, Francis — 112 
Kite, Dulcie — 319 
Kite, Henry — 191, 374 
Kittle, Bob— 112 
Kjarsgaard, Robert — 109 
Klassen, Theodore — 374 
Klabau, Bill— 237 
Klameth, Leo — 114, 374 
Klarguist, Jodie — 147 
Klein, Marceline — 184, 319 
Klema, Margaret — 148, 154, 170, 374 
Kleopfer, Donald — 374 
Kletchka, Edmond — 155 
Kline, Charles — 374 
Kloeffler, Gale — 201, 374 
Kloeffler, R. G. — 50 
Klod and Kernel Klub— 74 
Klover, George — 107 
Kloxin, Archie — 202, 374 
Kluge, Cecil — 115 
Knapp, Alphia— 112, 191, 374 
Knapp, Dolores — 105, 161, 169, 374 
Knapp, William — 374 
Knappenberger, Francis — 197, 374 
Knedlik, Norton — 319 
Knight, Harold — 374 
Knight, Jo Anne — 374 
Knight, Robert — 187, 202, 374 
Knight, William — 374 
Knilans, Richard — 107 
Knoche, Delores— 80, 105, 169, 374 
Knoche, Robert — 1 14 
Knoef el, Robert — 115 
Knope, Donald — 97, 319 
Knopp, Willis — 116 
Knorr, Fritz — 137 
Knouse, Daniel — 74 
Knouse, William — 374 
Knowles, Arthur — 374 
Knowles, Bernard — 74, 203, 374 
Knowles, John — 95 
Knowlton, Richard — 78, 116, 374 
Knox, Bennita— 153, 163, 374 
Kobbeman, Donald — 101 
Kobrock, Robert — 319 
Kobs, Alice — 155 
Koch, Alfred— 74, 80, 133, 319 
Koch, Mary— 80. 374 
Kohler, Anna — 63 

Kohlrus, Peter — 118, 155, 199, 374 
Kohn, John — 272, 374 
Kolsky, Gerald — 50 
Kolste, Loren — 194, 319 
Kolterman, Delbert — 374 
Komisar, Aaron — 84, 374 
Konecny, John — 81, 112, 374 
Kongs, Clarence— 155, 199, 319 
Konold. Richard — 198, 374 
Koon, Norma — 80, 148, 154, 182, 374 
Korb, Billy— 114 
Kordes, Howard — 101, 190. 374 
Kornemann, Virginia — 91, 180, 374 
Kors, Kermit — 188, 374 
Kortman. Dwight— 90, 202, 374 
Koslow. Martin — 374 
Koury, Sam — 78 

Kraemer, Barbara — 161, 169, 374 
Kraemer, Donna — 91, 169, 227, 374 
Kraemer, Vincent — 374 
Kramer, Fred C— 90, 111, 319 
Kramer, Frederick L. — 98, 198, 272, 

319 
Kramer, Dr. Martha — 53 
Kramer, Marvin— 99. 114, 198, 374 
Kramer, Raymond — 75, 155, 199, 201, 

218, 374 
Kramer, Rudolph— 201, 374 
Kraner, Lois — 169, 375 
Krause, Earl — 114 
Krause, George— 74, 133, 195, 319 
Krause, Harold— 151, 375 
Krause, William — 155, 284 
Krehbiel, Betty— 87, 183, 375 
Kreider, John — 112 
Kremer, Dr. Josephine — 5 3 
Kreutzer, Helene — 375 
Krey, Max— 83, 203, 375 
Kring, James— 63, 86, 15 5 
Krizman, Richard — 88, 155, 191, 375 
Krone, Lloyd— 101, 231 
Krug, Glenn — -112 
Krug, LaVada— 163, 375 
Kruse, Calvin — 88, 148, 375 
Kruse, Rex— 187, 194, 375 
Knise, W. F.— 375 
K-State Engineer Magazine — 278 
Kubicki. Gene — 201, 375 
Kub : k, Ralph — 375 
Kubik. Richard — 375 
Kuckelman, Paul— 155, 200, 375 
Kueny, Leola — 375 
Kugler, Harold — 79 
Kugler, Laberta — 80. 102. 103, 145, 

153, 161. 167, 275, 375 
Kuhlman, Henry, Jr. — 119, 375 
Kuhn.Cleo — 375 

Kuhn, Robert— 75, 78, 80, 117, 375 
Kuitert, Louis — 86 



438 



Kuss, Oliver — 79 
Kutknink, Paul — 112 
Kwong, Shue Shan — 63, 77 
Kwong, Yeu Ting — 63, 77 
Kyrk, Willard— 112 
Kysar, Robert — 188, 375 



— L 



375 



375 



319 



Lacey, John — 79, 375 

Lacey, Ruth — 164, 375 

Lachman, Richard — 87 

Lachman, Roger — 375 

LaCroix, Paul — 118, 202, 375 

Lacy, Lillian — 104, 178, 375 

Lacy, Merle — 200, 375 

LaFiel — 169 

Lagasse, Margaret — 105, 169 

Lagergren, Charles — 99, 375 

Lagergren, Frederick — 375 

Lair, Virgil — 189, 375 

Lamb, John — 198, 375 

Lamb, Maurice — 86, 375 

Lambert, Addie — 375 

Lambert, Charlotte — 163 

Lambert, James — 319 

Lambert, Jeanne — 106 

Lambert, Joseph — 155, 375 

Lambert, Lucille — 295, 375 

Lamborn, Nancy — 104, 169, 375 

Lambright, Donald — 116, 375 

Lamoreaux, Rebecca — 179, 269, 319 

Lampe, Alvin — 375 

Lampton, Walter — 375 

Lancaster, Donald — 114, 151, 152 

Lancaster. Margaret — 136, 149, 171, 319 

Landau, Darrell — 97, 375 

Landau, Marjorie — 178, 272, 375 

Lander, Wayne — 99, 190, 375 

Landis, Benjamin — 87 

Land's, Donald — 15 5 

Landreth, Jack — 198, 375 

Landstrom, Mrs. A. W. — 180 

Lane, Charles — 83, 197, 319 

Lang, Ray — 155 

Langer, Herbert — 376 

Langer, Melba — 164, 376 

Langford, Thomas — 96 

Langhofer, Billy — 81, 112, 160, 218, 

376 
Langshaw, George — 115 
Langston, Arel — 376 
Langton, Allan — 72. 203, 234, 376 
Lanier, Irvin — 80, 95, 146, 147, 376 
Lanning, Edgar — 376 
Lanoue, Eli — 155, 199, 376 
Lanoue, Wanda Knight — 130, 178, 376 
Lanphere, Charles — 82, 83 
Lansden, John — 376 
LaOrange, George — 114 
Larberg, G. Robert — 201, 287, 288, 376 
Lareau, James — 87 
Larrick, Marilyn — 179, 376 
Larsen, Donald — 195, 319 
Larsen, Florence — 81, 376 
Larsen, Royce — 205, 376 
Larson, George — 100 
Larson, Kathryn — 81, 104 

163, 376 
Larson, Lewis — 101, 376 
Larson, Marilyn — 103, 183, 319 
Larson, Thaine — 80, 172, 229, 376 
Larson, Worth — 107 
Lashbrook, Ralph — 46 

279 
Lasley, George — 1 1 2 
Lasnier, Donald — 153 
Lassen, Buster — 76, 114, 
Latimer, Margaret — 376 
Latschar, Arnold — 76, 133, 319 
Latzke, Alpha — 53 
Laughinghouse, Lyal — 181, 272, 376 
Laughlin, Jeanne — 155, 183,319 
Laughlin, Patricia — 155, 183, 376 
Laughlin, William — 376 
Law, J. Leland — 116, 376 
Law, Suanne — 136, 153, 186, 319 
Lawhead, Dorothy — 91 
Lawrence, Donald — 79, 81, 189, 376 
Lawrence, George — 76, 114, 376 
Lawrence, Gerald — 79, 116 
Lawrence, M/Sgt. John — 1 10 
Lawrence, Wayne — 112, 376 ' 
Lawson, Belva — 183, 376 
Lawson, Roger — 116, 376 
Lawyer, Marion — 151, 168, 376 
Lay, Betty — 376 
Lay, Jack — 112, 376 
Laybourn, Ross — 74, 192, 376 
Lea, Shirley — 183, 376 
Leaird, Dick — 98, 319 
Leasure, Dr. E. E. — 39, 57 
Leasure, George, Jr. — 95, 150, 25 3, 319 
Leathers, James — 79, 319 
Leathers, Thomas — 39, 284, 319 
Leavengood, L. D. 46, 135 
Lederer Loyal. Jr. — 204. 274, 376 
LeDnc, Ronald — 155, 199, 376 
Lee, Don— 108 
Lee, Peggy— 88, 272, 376 
Leeper, Kathryn — 86 
Lehman, Bernard — -108 
Lehman, Bernice — 81, 168, 376 
Lehman, Doris — 81, 168, 319 



149, 151, 



78, 134, 180, 



199. 376 
198, 218, 



376 



Lehman, Gale — 225 

Lehmann, Emil, Jr. — 75, 376 

Lehnen, Robert — 117, 132, 155 

Leichliter, Vene— 78, 115 

Leighton, Hope — 130, 149, 376 

Leighton, Paulson — 112 

Leitt, John — 257 

Lemon, Carl, Jr. — 191, 376 

Lemon, Raymond — 376 

Lenhart, Laverna — 80, 102, 145, 147, 

167, 376 
Lenkner, Lucille — 164, 376 
Lentz, Charles — 279 
Lenz, Carl — 109 

Leonard, Floyd— 81, 115, 147, 376 
Leonard, Mary — 155, 185, 376 
Leonard, Patrick — 155, 199, 376 
Leonard, Rodney — 115, 274 
Lepori-B. Angelina — 89, 319 
LeRoy, Shirley — 84 
LeRoy, Stanford — 84, 376 
Leslie, David — 95, 132 
Leslie, Lorene — 106 
Lesser, Martin — 376 
Letbetter, T. D. — 88 
Lettrell, Kenneth — 160 
Levedahl, Edith — 135, 178, 319 
Levell, Frank — 114, 196, 376 
Levering, Wilbur — 376 
Levin, Edmund — 109 
Lewis, Anne — 376 
Lewis, Barbara — 184, 376 
Lewis, Charles — 112, 196, 376 
Lewis, Cloyd — 109 
Lewis, David — 88, 191, 319 
Lewis, Eugene — 89, 148, 377 
Lewis, Frank — 377 
Lewis, George — 76 
Lewis, James — 197, 377 
Lewis, John— 111, 132, 319 
Lewis, Joseph — 377 
Lewis, Katherine — 147, 166, 319 
Lewis, Lloyd — 75, 80, 148, 377 
Lewis, Robert F. — 115, 203, 231, 377 
Lewis, Robert G. — 377 
Lewis, William — 198, 377 
Lhuillier, Clayton — 319 
Liao, Yen-Shyong — 89 
Lichty, Garland — 201, 278, 377 
Lidinsky, Edward — 155 
Liebeno, Allan — 155 
Licbl, Elwyn— 78, 109, 199, 377 
Lill. Richard — 99 
Lilliequ : st, Pearl — 163, 277, 319 
Linares, Bruno — 89 
Lind, Benjamin — 203, 317 
Lind. Wendell— 96, 15 3, 200, 377 
Lindblom, Richard — 201, 259, 377 
Lindgren, Lawrence — 78, 377 
Lindgren, Paulin — 106 
Lindgren, Stanley — 117, 190, 377 
Lindholm, Claribel — 163, 377 
Lindholm, Ernest — 98, 319 
Lindholm, Howard — 73, 75, 133, 146, 

151, 152. 195, 271, 377 
Lindholm, John— 80, 151, 152, 258, 

377 
Lindholm, Leonard — 75, 80, 377 
Lindholm, M : ldred — 149. 151 
Lindquist. Raymond — 377 
Lindsey. Claude, Jr. — 172, 257, 377 
Lindsey, Fred. Jr. — 97 
Lingafelter, Max — 201, 377 
Lingelbich. Daniel — 119, 151, 205, 319 
Link, Donald — 155, 377 
Link. Glendeen — 87, 163, 261, 274, 

275. 377 
Linn, Dan — 88 
Linn. Dorothy — 136, 147, 149, 163, 

377 
Linn, Evelvn — 106 
Linscheid Ronald — 116, 192, 377 
Linville, Thomas — 377 
Lips. Walter — 377 
L'st. Wallace— 274 
Little. Pleasant — 115 
Littlefield, Winston — 98, 319 
Livers, David. Jr. — 187, 205, 377 
Livers, Ronald — 74. 270. 319 
Livingston, Toy — 74, 377 
Lloyd, Harold — 112, 377 
Loader. Weldon— 81, 377 
Lockstrom, Donald — 1 14 
Loe, Chester — 201, 319 
Logan, Donald — 97, 319 
Logan, John — 116, 201, 377 
Logan, Mae — 377 
Londeen. Allen — 279, 377 
Loney. Marge — 377 
Long, Dorothy — 377 
Long, Glenn — 88 
Long, Richard — 1 1 7 
Long, Robert — 193. 377 
Long, Sue Ann — 181, 377 
Long, Tvson — 109 
Long, Wayne — 1 15,151,377 
Longsdorf, L. L. — 61 
Longfellow. Delbert — 97, 319 
Lonerw'fh, Jess" — 90 
Look. Don — 194, 377 
Loomis, Marjorie — 104, 146, 163, 377 
Loomis, Ruthann — 103. 163. 319 
Lorson, Mary Jeanne — 88, 155, 168, 377 
Lorson. Robert— 97, 111, 155, 199, 319 
Loska, Stephen — 63, 76, 133 
Lothman, Theodore — 202, 377 
Love, Donald— 75, 81, 279, 377 



Love, Guyla — 104, 145, 153, 164, 377 

Lovell, Betty — 275 

Lovell, Susan— 185, 378 

Lovendahl, Warren — 97, 118, 188, 378 

Lovett, Gene — 112, 192, 378 

Low, Galen — 96, 319 

Lowe, Russell — 378 

Lowell, Katherine — 71, 181, 378 

Loy, Beverly — 104, 163, 319 

Loyd, Don — 115, 378 

Loyd, Inez — 63 

Loyd, James — 193, 319 

Loyd, Ralph — 63 

Lubroth, Irwin — 378 

Lubroth, Mildred — 84, 89, 319 

Lucas, George — 378 

Ludwig, Keith — 109 

Luehring, Leonard — 101, 131, 137, 319 

Lukens, Harold — 80, 115, 191, 378 

Lull, Linton — 75, 271, 321 

Lumpkin, Norma — 180, 321 

Lundgren, Paul— 279, 378 

Lundholm, Joe, Jr. — 321 

Lundquist, Clinton — 74, 150, 321 

Lundquist, Marvin — 378 

Lundstrom, Victor — 109 

Lundgren, Herbert— 115, 151, 152, 378 

Lungstrom, Leon — 63, 150 

Lutzen, Oliver- — 74 

Lutheran Students Association — 150 

Luthi, Jack — 115 

Luthi, Jaunita — 160, 378 

Luthi, Lloyd— 80, 82, 115 

Luthi, Wilma — 80, 149, 378 

Lutters, Leonard — 1 12 

Lygrisse, Darlene — 91, 180, 227, 378 

Lyles, Mrs. Ella — 188 

Lyman, Eva — 91 

Lyman, Merrick 90 

Lyman, Paul — 36, 100, 197, 378 

Lyness, Anita — 69, 184, 378 

Lyness. Philip — 63 

Lynn. Russell — 80, 114 

Lyon, Charles — 378 

Lyon, George — 120, 321 

Lyon, John — 80, 148, 160, 378 

Lyons, Charles — 136, 256 

Lyons, Thomas — 378 



— Mc — 



McAfee. Millard— 115 
McAnelly, Zane — 1 1 5 
McBride, Frank— 88, 118, 378 
McBride, John — 81, 190, 378 
McCahon, Tames — 274, 275 
McCall, Leland— 112 
McCall, Sybil — 378 
McCallum, Dean — 78. 378 
McCallum, Jean E. — 80, 147, 170 
McCammon. John — 76, 133 
McCannon. Rex — 76 
McCarroll, Mrs. Helen — 190 
McCarthy, Charles — 1 18 
McCarthy. Daniel — 155, 199, 378 
McCarty, Lawrence — 81, 115,218, 378 
McCaskill, George — 137, 321 
McCauley, Gordon — 83, 279, 378 
McCauley, Harold — 97, 132, 279, 321 
McCauley, Warren — 274, 275, 378 
McCauley. W. E. — 86 
McCausland. Jim — 187, 193, 378 
McCaustland. Robert— 112, 198, 378 
McCay, Jerome — 272, 378 
McClaskey, Dale — 75, 81 
McClaskey. Jack — 79 
McClay, Margaret — 85, 91 
McClay, Rodney — 249, 25 3 
McClean, Dan — 378 
McClellan, Verle — 25 5 
McCIintock. Tohn— 101. 378 
McClure, Philip— 115, 378 
McClure, F^b-rtS.. Jr.— 83. 155, 378 
McClure. William H., Jr.— 378 
McCoid. Barbara — 81, 182, 272, 378 
McCorrb. Cecil — 132, 321 
McCormack, Robert — 83, 116, 378 
McCormick, Charles — 83 
McCormick. Elton — 189, 378 
McCormick, Glenn — 73, 82, 270 
McCoy. James E. — 378 
McCoy, James L. — 378 
McCoy, Lester — 30 
McCoy, Mary— 149, 151, 378 
McCoy, Nancy — 378 
McCracken, Donald— 114, 218, 278, 

378 
McCrary. Patricia — 128, 130. 186, 321 
McCrady, Thurlo— 46, 144, 216 
McCready, Tesse — 114 
McCrerey. Ruth — 136, 161, 170, 321 
McCune, Duane — 79, 378 
McCune, Howard — 112, 194, 378 
McCurdy, Ralph G. Jr.— 190, 378 
McCutcheon. Robert — 108 
McDanel, Maurice— 100, 378 
McDaniel. William S., Jr. — 378 
McDill. Glenvs— 163, 378 
McDonald, Tane — 145. 164. 178, 321 
McDonald, Philip — 189. 378 
McDonald. Richard— 114, 197. 378 
McDonald, William M., Jr. — 146, 150 
McDougal, Luroy — 74, 321 
McDowell, M. L. — 137 



McDowell, Norma — 81, 153, 378 
McEachern, Billie — 112, 202, 378 
McFadden, Harold — 115, 378 
McFadden, Lawrence — 116 
McFadden, Robert — 76, 111, 155,321 
McGee, William — 86 
McGehee, Richard — 115 
McGeorge, Dorothy— 78, 130, 134, 167, 

321 
McGhee, Charles — 378 
McGill, Edward — 197, 379 
McGill, John— 112, 198, 379 
McGinity, Joseph — 107 
McGinness, Constance — 103, 153, 163, 

379 
McGinness. Edward— 75, 81, 151, 187, 

195,379 
McGinness, Kenneth — 77, 79 
McGinnis, Dale — 115 
McGlothlin, Howard — 379 
McGovern. Louis — 101, 128, 321 
McGrath, Harry — 192, 379 
McGrew, Elsie — 164, 379 
McGuire, Vernon — 138, 276 
McGuire, Virginia — 163, 321 
McHarg, Robert — 101, 321 
Mcllvain, Mary — 134, 163, 274, 275, 

379 
Mcintosh, Vergil — 120 
Mclntyre, John — 321 
McKee, Miles— 81, 115 
McKee, Robert— 201, 379 
McKee, Walter — 81, 116, 379 
McKeen. John — 101, 112, 198, 379 
McKim, Ivan, Jr. — 379 
McK : nney. Florence — 63, 260 
McKitterick, James — 109, 202, 
McLaughlin, Drew — 30 
McLaughlin, Harry— 200, 379 
McLaughlin. Irven — 95 
McLean, Katherine — 163, 379 
McLeland, James— 1 19, 379 
McLeland, Robert — 379 
McLeod, Robert — 114, 279 
McLeod. W. M.— 57 
McMahon, Charlene — 155, 379 
McMannis, Lawrence — 96, 144, 218, 

321 
McMillan, Stanley — 1 16 
McMillen, Ann — 186, 300, 379 
McMinn, Terry— 112, 198, 379 
McMullen. Mildred — 135 
McNabb, Robert — 109 
McNabney, Carolyn — 181, 285, 288, 321 
McNaughton, Edward, Jr. — 151, 152, 

379 
McNay, Carroll— 193, 379 
McNeil, Edgar— 155. 219, 225, 379 
McNeil. Halcyon — 379 
McNeil, Ralph— 379 
McNeill, Monita— 71, 105, 183, 379 
McNeill, William— 379 
McNcholas, JoEllen — 87, 130, 145, 149, 

151, 180. 379 
McPhail. Ross — 81. 151 
McReynolds. Kenneth— 151, 152, 379 
McVeigh. Amos — 19.3, 379 
McVey, Patric-'a— 145. 146, 180, 321 
McWilliams. Donald — 77 
McWilson, Roger — 379 



379 



— M — 



Maas, Joseph — 379 
Mahie. Richard — 321 
MacCaskill. Mary — 163, 379 
Mace. Claron — 379 
MacCreary, Frank — 188, 379 
MacGreeor. Margaret — 178. 379 
Mack, Willis — 116, 193. 379 
Mackintosh, Darlene — 321 
Macintosh, David O. — 107, 129. 271, 

379 
Macy. E. B.— 78, 134. 278 
Madden, Bruce— 97, 132. 321 
Maddox, Bryon. Tr. — 379 
Maddox, Wendeil— 81. 379 
Maddux, Howard— 112, 379 
Madison. Brenton — 86. 151, 275, 379 
Magers, Malcolm, Jr. — 379 
Maggard, Henry — 379 
Magnus, Alverda — 149. 151, 380 
Magnus. Bedford — 95, 380 
Maenus. Norma — 102, 136, 149, 380 
Mah. Yin Wah— 89 
Mahoney. George — 94, 9S. 321 
Mahoney, Kenneth— 155, 199, 232, 380 
Mahoney. Martin — 115 
Ma'-oney. WilTam — ~6, 3S0 
Mailhiot, Michael — 100 
Main. Max — 204, 380 
Maison-elle — 170 
Mall, Tames — 77 
Mall. Tot,— 112 

Mall. William— 134, 13S. 181. 321 
Mallory. Bonnie — 81, 105, 149, 151, 

163, 380 
Malone, Berty — 179. 3S0 
Malone, Robert — 115 
Malone, William — 3 SO 
Maloney. Joseph — 190. 3S0 
Maloney. Prof. Richard^-45 
Malott, Carrington — 1 IS 
Malott, Harvey — 1 1 8 



439 



Mamaw, Dean — 151 

Manges, Harry — 100, 380 

Manion, George, Jr. — 203, 380 

Manis, Al — 115, 380 

Manke, Charles — 87, 380 

Mannell, Leon — 95, 380 

Manning, John, Jr. — 109 

Manos, Sammy — 205, 380 

Mansfield, Versa — 105, 154 

Marak, Eldon — 380 

March, Arthur — 191, 380 

March, Pat— 272, 380 

Mardiks, David — 321 

Mariani, Robert — 380 

Markey, William — 99, 155, 199, 278, 

321 
Markham, Peggy — 83, 163, 321 
Markley, Lewis — 200, 380 
Markley, Mary Louise — 63, 81, 321 
Marlatt, Abby — 130 
Marlin, Sidney — 108 
Marlow, Shelton — 198, 321 
Marmon, Fayette — 380 
Marmon, Raymond — 79 
Marnix, Melville, Jr.— 101 194, 380 
Marrs, Roy — 114, 380 
Marshall, Deems — 197, 380 
Marshall, Doris— 183, 227, 321 
Marshall, Kenneth — 380 
Marshall, Paul, Jr. — 192, 380 
Marteney, Edward — 380 
Martens, Paul — 197, 380 
Martin, Anna— 83, 84, 138, 151, 272, 

321 
Martin, Dale — 107 
Martin, K. H. — 96 
Martin, Lewis — 100 
Martin, Loren — 112, 151, 152, 380 
Martin, Max — -275 
Martin, Nancy — 380 
Martin, Nannette— 155, 183, 272, 275, 

380 
Martin, Phyllis— 90, 145, 183, 272, 

380 
Martin, Richard — 112, 193, 380 
Martin, Sally — 178, 380 
Martin, Stuart — 99 
Martin, Victor — 380 
Marx, Tommy — 155 
Maskil, Oliver — 87, 380 
Mason, Everett — 321 
Mason, James, Jr. — 100, 321 
Mason, John — 99, 380 
Mason, Robert — 195, 258, 380 
Massey, Ralph— 79, 380 
Massoth, Martin — 1 1 1 
Masters, Orpha — 181. 380 
Mastin, Arlene — 180, 321 
Mastin, Loren — 380 
Matey, Herbert — 1 1 2 
Mathematics Club — 86 
Mather, Edward — 380 
Mathews, Robert — 380 
Mathews, Ulysses — 196, 380 
Mathis, Helen — 272, 380 
Mathy, Harold — 83, 380 
Matlack, Don — 115, 193, 380 
Matson, Jack — 114, 380 
Matson, Lawrence — 321 
Matthew, Dick — 202. 380 
Matthews, Claude — 82, 83 
Matthews, Jack — 83 
Matthews, James — 96. 321 
Matthews, Kermit — 99, 380 
Matthews, Ruth — 83 
Matthews, Walter — 99 
Matti, Marvin — 114, 380 
Mattler, Don — 83 
Mattson, David — 205, 380 
Mattson, Jo Ann — 381 
Maupin, Ardeth — 185, 272, 380 
Maxfield, Bonna — 163, 227, 321 
Maxwell. Ruthetta — 130, 179, 381 
May, Hobart, Jr. —197, 381 
Mayall, Elizabeth — 81, 182/272, 381 
Mayall, Marion — 205, 381 
Mayfield, Jessie — 1 1 1 
Mays, Clova — 63 
Mayse, M. M. — 99 
Mead, Richard — 115. 381 
Meade, Jean — 170 
Meade, Norma — 381 
Mealey, Robert — 115. 381 
Means, Harold, Jr. — 203, 381 
Means, Thomas — 75. 85, 144, 
Medcalf, Charles — 75 
Medlin, C. T. — 134. 180, 181, 
Medlin, Richard — 29 04,101 

128, 131, 137. 306, 321 
Medlin, Roger — 134. 181, 283. 
Meenen, Donald — 112. 274, 381 
Mees, Teresa — 155, 381 
Mehl, Reine — 163, 381 
Meili, Mary lane — 102, 103, 

151 163, 321 
Meine, Doris — 166 
Meinen, Stanley — 81. 160, 381 
Meinut, Stanley — 160 
Meisner, Darlene — 91. 184, 321 
Meisner, John — 111. 202 
Melcher, Newell — 321 
Melchers, L. E. — 46 
Melgren, Willis — 112. 146. 381 
Mellenbruch, Mary — 166, 381 
Mellor, Stanley — 192, 381 
Mellott, John — 381 
Melody, William — 219, 223, 321 



Melroy, David — 155, 199, 218, 381 

Men's Glee Club— 273 

Men's Intramurals — 258, 259 

Meredith, Busch — 109 

Meredith, Clifford— 99 

Merrill, Catherine — 186, 268, 288, 3£ 

Merrill, Fred— 76, 198, 381 

Merriman, Harry — 131, 193, 219, 321 

Merriman, Richard — 193, 381 

Merritt, Douglas — 107 

Mersky. Harold — 108 

Mertz, Den — 80, 147 

Mertz, Harold— 8 1 , 112, 381 

Mertz, Louis, Jr. — 95. 321 

Merwarth, William — 218 

Methodist Men's Club — 152 

Mettler, Don — 321 

Mettler, Steward — 81, 83, 381 

Metz, Harold — 82, 83, 200, 381 

Metzinger, Walter — 115, 381 



195, 381 

279 
127, 



321 



104, 149, 



-198, 381 



381 



Meyer, Jim — 155 

Meyer, John W., Jr.- 

Meyer, Lloyd — 155 

Meyer, Mary — 163, 381 

Meyer, Richard — 381 

Meyer, Robert — 101, 381 

Meyers, Dale — 114, 190, 381 

Meyers, Edmund — 77, 381 

Meyers, Verla Lou — 81, 151, 169. 

Michael, William — 381 

Mickey, Wanda Lee — 275 

Middleton, Irvin, Jr. — 87, 101, 381 

Middleton. Nancy — 147, 149, 381 

Mierau, William — 99. 205, 381 

Milburn, Helen — 147 

Military Ball — 121 

Millard, Raymond, Jr. — 86, 197, 381 

Miller, Arthur — 100 

Miller, Barbara A. — 105, 153, 163, 381 

Miller, Barbara Howell — 181, 381 

Miller, Carolyn — 178. 321 

Miller. Charles — 76, 192, 381 

Miller, Clyde — 381 

Miller, Dean — 79, 146, 381 

Miller, Donald — 100 

Miller, Duane — 190, 381 

Miller, Frank, Jr. — 86 

Miller. Harold L. — 382 

Miller, Harold W. — 111 

Miller, Harris — 116, 382 

Miller, Mrs. Helen — 198 

Miller, Janice — 102, 163, 321 

Miller, Jeanne — 153 

Miller, Martha — 125, 178, 227, 382 

Miller, Mary — 179, 321 

Miller. Max — 77 

Miller, Milton — 115. 382 

Miller, Richard — 112 

Miller, Robert— 1 14. 190, 274, 382 

Miller. Ross — 201, 382 

Miller, Vesta — 182, 382 

Miller, Victor — 109 

Miller, Wilfred — 321 

Miller, William— 83 

Milling Association — 76 

Mills, Donald — 109 

Mills, James — 382 

Mills, Kenneth — 204, 382 

Mills, Marilyn— 178. 382 

Mills, Willa— 81, 103, 151, 182, 227, 

382 
Miilner, Betty — 84 
Milner, Harold — 193, 
Milner, Max — 84 
Miniwanca Club — 85 
Minks, Norman — 75, 
Minor, Vernon — 101 , 
Miracle, John — 382 
Misegades. Dean — 112, 148, 
Mitchell, Barbara — 382 
Mitchell, Dean — 115. 382 
Mitchell, Eleanore — 202 
Mitchell, Harold C— 382 
Mitchell, Harold E. — 111, 203, 382 
Mitchell, H. L. — 137 
Mitchell, John — 112, 382 
Mitchell, Margery — 153, 184, 272, 382 
Mitchell, Marjorie — 179, 382 
Mitchell, Nick — 382 
Mitchell, Rodger — 86. 147 
Mitchelson, Blly — 189, 382 
Moate. Francie — 80. 164, 382 
Moats, M. Jane — 163, 382 
Mock, Bruce — 382 
Mock. Robert — 1 1 1 
Moehlman, Eva — 155, 272, 382 
Moehring, Don C. II — 197, 382 
Moeller, Calvin — 151. 382 
Moffatt, Eugene Jr. — 382 
Moffett, Joseoh — 86 
Moffett, Patricia — 105 
Moggie, M. C. — 63 
Mohn, Paul — 148. 104. 382 
Mohr, Wayne — 96. 132, 198, 382 
Moll, Conrad — 137, 257 
Moll, Jack — 117 

Moll, Patricia — 84. 1 *.*. 183, 272, 382 
Moll, RalDh — 197, 382 
Molson, Toseph — 1 1 1 
Molzen, Dayton — 09 U8, 197, 382 
Molzen, Hazel — 63, 89 
Moncrief, E. Stanton — 197, 321 
Moner, Dominic — 1 1 2 
Money, John— 191. 275, 382 
Montague, David — 382 
Montague, Deloris — 89, 177, 179, 227 

288, 382 



382 



87, 270 
191, 382 



382 



Montgaue, Mary Helen — 382 
Montgomery, Clara — 182, 382 
Montgomery, George — 41, 46 
Montgomery, Mary Ann — 279 
Montgomery, Robert — 321 
Moody, Edward — 148, 382 
Moody, Jack— 190, 382 
Moody, Richard — 323, 382 
Moomaw, Marilyn — 149, 151, 170, 

295, 382 
Moore, Charles — 197, 382 
Moore, Claude — 77 
Moore, Dale — 323 
Moore, Edward — 109 
Moore, Edwin — 382 
Moore, Fritz — 46, 84 
Moore, Dean Helen — 39 
Moore, Leslie — 78 
Moore, Luther — 87 
Moore, Marilyn — 130, 177, 186, 382 
Moore, Mary — 146, 164, 382 
Moore, Richard — 382 
Moore, Mrs. T. H. — 170 
Moore th' Merrier — 170 
Moore, Theirl — 151, 382 
Moore, Thelma — 180, 227, 382 
Moore, Thomas — 88, 321, 
Moore, Wesley — 86, 116, 382 
Moorman, John — 115, 382 
Moors, George — 75, 81, 382 
Moots, Frank — 190, 383 
Moran, Jack — 112, 155 
Moran John J., Jr. — 383 
Moran, Kyle — 188, 383 
Mordy, Robert — 112 
Moreen, Thomas — 88, 201, 287, 323 
Morehouse, Lawrence — -383 
Morgan, Albert — 119, 192, 383 
Morgan, Carl — 151, 194, 272, 383 
Morgan, Edward — 192, 383 
Morgan, Eleanor — 185, 383 
Morgan, James — 115 
Morgan, Joseph — 112, 227, 272 
Morgan. Lois — 103, 179, 383 
Morgan, Ruby — 145, 155, 184, 383 
Morgan, William — 201, 383 
Morgenson, Julius — 76 
Moritz, Mrs. Frances — 120, 155 
Moritz, Ray — 155 
Morris, Drexyel — 1 1 2 
Morris, George — 99 
Morris, Lyle — 279, 383 
Morris, Max — 1 1 2 
Morrish, Cynthia — 105. 181, 383 
Morrison, Gail — 88, 160, 383 
Morrison, Iolene — 105, 163, 383 
Morrison, Joel — 81, 112, 383 
Morrison, John — 383 
Morrison, Kenneth J. — 74, 323, 383 
Morrison, Kenneth S. — 193 
Morrow, Gene — 383 
Morse, Elliott — 101, 383 
Morse, Dr. Reed F. — 50, 63, 131 
Morse, Richard — 99, 116, 193, 383 
Mortar Board — 127 

Mortimer. Norman — 116. 203, 237, 383 
Morton, Helen — 184, 227, 383 
Morton, Melvina — 383 
Morton, Raymond — 202, 323 
Moser, Alan — 115. 160 
Moser, Robert — 198, 383 
Moses, Joseph — 321 
Mosher, Harold — 323 
Mosier, Betty — 383 
Mosier, Frank A. — 81, 112, 383 
Mosier, Louise — 102, 103, 105, 182, 

227. 277, 323 
Moss, Jack — 202. 383 
Moss, Robert — 383 
Mossman, Richard — 146, 383 
Mothes, John — 1 1 2 
Motin, James — 196, 383 
Motter, Eugene — 383 
Mounkes. Darrell — 323 
Mount, William— 97. 205. 323 
Mountain. Betty — 169. 383 
Mowery. Bernard — 108 
Moyle, Wallace A., Jr. — 82, 120 
Muckenthaler, George — 155, 383 
Muckenthaler, Leona — 155, 272, 383 
Mudge, Carol — 169, 383 
Mudge, Harry — 82. 133, 195, 270, 323 
Mudee, Melville — 63. 82, 83 
Mueller, Laureen — 151, 383 
Mueller, Que — 114 
Mugler, Marilyn — 163, 383 
Muirhead, Robert — 201, 383 
Muirhead, Ruth — 177, 185, 285, 288, 

323 
Mulhern, Caroline — 155, 38^ 
Mulhern Lawrence — 155, 383 
Mulkey, Everett — 95, 383 
Mullen, C. W. — 41 
Mumaw, Dean — 112, 383 
Munger, Glenn O., Tr. — 76, 192. 383 
Munger, Nancy— 153, 186, 227, 285, 

288, 384 
Mu Phi Epsilon — 138 
Murphy, Donald — 112. 384 
Murphy, Frances — 104, 384 
Murphy, John — 119, 384 
Murphy, Capt. Joseph K. — 110 
Murphy, Michael — 81, 112, 384 
Murphy, Mrs. Robert T. — 200 
Murray, Edward, Jr. — 81, 90, 384 
Murry, Francis — 108 



Muscolino, Sam — 219, 224 
Mushrush, Robert — 112 
Musil, Charles — 88, 384 
Mussett, James R., Jr. — 118, 384 
Musson, Forrest — 194, 384 
Mustard, Elizabeth — 138, 177, 183, 

272, 384 
Myer, Kenneth — 112, 160, 384 
Myers, Carolyn — 163, 323 
Myers, Doris — 88, 172 
Myers, Frank — 217 
Myers, Herbert — 112, 384 
Myers, Dr. H. E. — 41 
Myers, Joan — 186, 323 
Myers, Michael — 88, 115, 192, 384 
Myers, Norma — 91, 145. 153, 186, 384 
Myers, Robert — 323 



— N — 



Nabours, Richard — 201, 384 
Nace, Charles — 109 
Nace, John — 79 
Nace, Marjorie — 166 
Nakashima, Jason — 89, 384 
Nanninga, Gloria — 88, 179, 
Nanninga, Ralph — 88, 384 
Nash, Roy — 384 
Naslund, Ralph — 95, 384 
Nathan, Joe — 101, 188, 323 
Nattier, Clayton — 101 
Nault, Dwaine — 99, 384 
Navarre, Sara — 163, 384 
Navarro, Manuel — 1 14 



384 



-81, 105, 169, 384 



151, 384 
151, 152, 



384 



Navinskey, Theresa— 

Neal, Charles— 116 

Neal, James — 109 

Neal, Jean— 78, 179, 384 

Neal, Joan — 384 

Neal, William — 87, 188, 384 

Near, Charles — 384 

Nease, Edward — 101, 155, 384 

Nebergall, Marguerite — 81, 91, 182, 

187, 384 
Needham, Mary — 15 5, 384 
Neeley, Bernice — 89, 128, 323 
Neeley, Mary Lou — 186, 384 
Neeley, Marjorie — 384 
Neely, Nancy— 78, 183, 384 
Neely, Thomas — 384 
Neely, William — 75, 155, 323 
Neff. Alven — 82 
Neff, Ann— 180, 384 
Neff. Arthur — 83, 153, 323 
Neff, Harold — 384 
Neher, David — 151 
Neher, Harold — 115, 
Neher, Raymond — 81, 151, 152, 384 
Nehring, Lola — 384 
Neibarger, Janice — 384 
Neifert, DeVere — 15 5 
Neighbor, Charles — 384 
Neighbor, Howard— 94, 135, 138, 204, 

323 
Neil, Richard— 111, 201, 
Neises, Mary — 105, 384 
Nelson, Albert — 78, 82, 384 
Nelson. Allan— 200, 218, 272, 384 
Nelson, Carroll — 99, 384 
Nelson, Dallas — 384 
Nelson, DeVere — 138 
Nelson, Duane — 117 
Nelson, George G. — 384 
Nelson, George W.— 187, 203, 384 
Nelson, Gordon — 82, 112, 384 
Nelson, Harold — 83, 205, 384 
Nelson, Joline — 15 V 186, 268, 384 
Nelson, Kenneth— 205, 384 
Nelson, Lee — 384 

Nelson, Mary Alice— 81. 160, 384 
Nelson, Mary Arlene — 81, 155, 171, 

277, 385 
Nelson, Oliver — 385 
Nelson, Patricia — 84, 185, 187, 272, 

279, 288, 385 
Nelson, Paul— 81, 113, 385 
Nelson, Roland — 115 
Nesbit, Charles— 73, 75, 128, 133, 

271, 323 
Neugent, Roger — 385 
Neumann, James — 198, 385 
New, Lowell— 112, 198, 385 
Newachek, Richard — 385 
Newberry, Joe — 1 17 
Newborg, Michael — 79 89 
Newcomb, Margaret — 152 
Newcomb, Richard — 100, 204, 385 
Newcomer, Joan — 186, 385 
Newell, Beth — 385 
Newell, Dean — 81, 114 
Newell. Jackie — 88, 160, 385 
Newkirk, Loretta — 106 
Newkirk. Ralph — 385 
Newlin, James — 385 
Newman, Charles — 114 
Newman Club — 155 
Newman, Ralph— 99. 385 
Newman, Robert — 202, 323 
News Bureau — 279 
Newton. Bob — 197, 385 
Newton, Dean — 100 
Newton, Talma — 163, 385 
Nichols, David— 131, 257, 385 
Nichols, Earl— 75,79. 323 



440 



385 

278, 323 
385 



Nichols, Elizabeth — 275, 323 
Nichols, Elmer — 385 
Nichols, Patty — 183, 385 
Nichols, Richard — 385 
Nichols, Shirley — 186, 227, 288 
Nicholson, William — 201, 385 
Nickelson, Shannon — 74, 133, 
Nickerson, Donald — 114, 151 
Niemeier, Adolph — 115, 385 
Niernberger, Charles — 88, 90, 155, 

.199, 385 
Nighswonger, Charles — 136, 254 
Nighswonger, Floyd — 385 
Nighswonger, Lester — 385 
Nightingale, Carlyle — 385 
Nightingale, Max — 88, 323 
Nijhawan, Om Prakash — 89 
Nikl, James — 385 
Nininger, Tracy — 132 
Nixon, Charles — 1 1 6 
Nixon, Eleanor — 227, 323 
Noble, Mary — 81, 182, 385 
Nock, Dr. S. A. — 35 
Nolder, Betty — 385 
Noll, Harry — 385 
Noonan, Mrs. Cecilia — 155 
Noonan, John — 155 
Noone, Raymond — 90, 155, 199, 385 
Nordstrom, Pauline — 164, 227, 385 
Nordyke, Betty — 161, 166 
Nordyke, Max — 385 
Norris, Bette — 181, 323 
Norton, James — 112, 385 
Norton, Robert — 88, 203. 385 
Norton. Virginia — 88, 178, 385 
Noyes, Nadine — 163, 323 
Noynaert, Paul — 197, 385 
Nunn, Dean — 76, 116, 385 
Nutt, Grover — 111. 136, 219, 226 
Nutter, Merline — 169, 261, 279, 323 
Nutter, Murlin — 385 
Nyhoff, Vernon — 86, 385 



Otto, Mrs. Merton — 85 
Otwell, Harriette — 180, 386 
Outstanding Seniors — 301, 332 
Ovebele, Sylvester — 155 
Overley, Frank — 81, 116, 195, 386 
Overley, Lawra — 386 
Overton, Thomas — 101, 113 
Owen, John — 1 1 3 
Owens, Frank — 219 



o — 



Ober. Nelson — 385 

Oberhelman, Corrin — 272, 386 

Oberhelman, Dean — 137, 386 

Oberhelman, Robert — 193, 386 

Obley. Willard — 188. 386 

Obrecht, Martin — 108 

O'Connor, Ralph — 83 

O'Donnell, Dorothv — 386 

O'Donnell. Max — 386 

Oelke, Harlan — 386 

Ogden, Barbara — 106 

O'Grady, Pat — 155, 386 

Oldfield, Ilavere — 179. 272, 386 

Oldham, Billie — 163. 386 

Oldweiler, Morev — 1 1 3 

Olin, James — 109 

Oliphant Marcus — 386 

Olliver, Jean — 63 

Oliver, Marjorie — 136, 145, 154, 181 

323 
Olmstead. Elaine — 128, 323 
Olsen, Dale — 97, 131, 386 
Olsen, Robert — 150 
Olsen, Vernon — 100, 386 
Olson, Charles— 386 
Olson, Clyde — 386 
Olson, David — 323 
Olson, Guy — 112 
Olson, Harold — 386 
Olson, Tames — 15 5 
Olson, Mary — 150, 163, 386 
Olson, Robert — 114, 386 
Olson. Virginia — 71, 161, 167, 227, 

386 
Olson, Walter — 100 
Oltien.Twila — 81, 105, 150, 163, 

386 
Omicron Nu — 135 
Ondia. Lnwrence — 15^ 
O'Neal, Betty— 153, 186, 386 
O'Neal, George— 11 A. 198, 386 
O'Neil. Durl — 90. 386 
Opitz, Donald— 386 
Orchesis — 85 
Orchestra — 275 

Organization Control Board — 38 
Orr, Calvin — 113, 151, 386 
Orr, Joanne — 91. 186, 386 
Orr, Robert— 11 3 
Orr, Terrell— 181, 187, 386 
Orsborn, Harmon — 101. 386 
Ortman. Max — 115 186 
Orton, James— 78. 276, 386 
Orton, Oscar — 77 
Osborn, Clvde — 284 
Osborn, Edgar — *86 
Osborn, Ivan — 108 
Osborn, Ralnh — 95. 132, 323 
Osborn. Walter — 32 3 
Oshel, Dale — 100 
Oshel, Warren — 96 
Osmer, Will'am — 386 
Ostlund, K^rl — 70. 386 
Oswald, Tohn — 116. 192. 386 
Oswald, Roy — 09, 193, 386 
Ott. Gene — 113 
Otten, Bill— 201, 323 
Ott, James — 76, 133. 200 3?3 
Otto, Louis — 109, 187, 192, 386 



— P — 



Pace, Talton — 197, 386 

Pace, Panfilo— 98, 155, 323 

Pache, Carl — 88, 111, 323 

Page, Charles — 386 

Page, Dean — 113, 218 

Page, Esther — 81, 105, 171, 386 

Page, Naomi — 163, 323 

Paige, Orville — 386 

Paine, Jim — 15 1 

Painter, Clarice — 138 

Painter, Reginald — 86 

Paisley, Gerald — 386 

Palacios, Raul — 89 

Palacios, Yolanda — 89 

Palenske, Ross — 114 

Palmer, Dearrold — 109 

Palmer, Donald — 200, 386 

Palmer, Jean — 323 

Palmer, Louise — 180, 386 

Palmer, Robert — 117, 136, 386 

Pal-O-M-e— 171 

Palotay, James — 109 

Paluch. Albert — 155, 199, 218, 386 

Panhellenic — 177 

Pankaskie, Joseph — 155, 272 

Pannkuk, Barbara — 386 

Papin, Jackie — 196, 323 

Paradee, Daniel — 108, 386 

Paramore, Dorothy — 183, 386 

Parcel. Clair— 75, 133, 195, 271, 323 

Paris, Robert — 119 

Parish, Kenneth — 1 1 1 

Parizo, Robert — 114, 155, 386 

Park, George — 96, 155 

Parken, Dwight — 97, 386 

Parker, Charles — 108 

Parker, Raymond — 108 

Parker, Richard — 63 

Parker, Richard Langley — 86, 113, 204, 

386 
Parker, William — 81, 187, 195, 386 
Parkins. Billie — 145 
Parks, Evelyn — 147 
Parks, Tohn — 164, 387 
Parks, Leonel — 387 
Parks. Ralph — 79. 387 
Parr, Rolland — 387 
Parr, Virginia — 163, 274, 387 
Parris. Fred — 279, 283 
Parrish, Leslie — 117, 387 
Parrish, F. L. — 46, 63, 217 
Parsons, Clyde — 190. 387 
Parsons, John — 74. 133, 323 
Parsons, Ralph — 113 
Paschal, Wilma— 387 
Paschal, Willis — 387 
Pascoe. Wendell — 198, 272, 387 
Patrick, Gerald — 202, 235, 387 
Patrick, Leslie — 387 
Patten, Russell — 387 
Patterson, David — 387 
Patterson. Duane — 111. 285. 288, 323 
Patterson, Herman — 100. 323 
Patterson, lean — 160, 387 
Pattinson, James — 81, 94, 95, 387 
Patton Byron — 387 
Paul, Ellen — 167. 387 
Paul, George — 203. 387 
Paul. Theodore — 387 
Paull, Loren — 1 14 
Paulsen, Dale — 81, 113, 387 
Paustian Donald — 118,387 
Paveur, Dick — 3«7 
Payne, Arlene — 169, 387 
Payne, R=ttv — 136 323 
Payne, rbarle< — 101, 387 
Payne. Bill — 240 
Payne, Edith — 91, 387 
Payne, Dr. L. F. — 41 77, 146, 213 
Payne, Margaret — 3 87 
Payne, Richard — 387 
Payne, Vona — 171, 32 3 
Pearce, Prof. C E. — 50 
Pearce, Harry — 82. 83 205. 3?3 
Pearce, Wayne— 74. 79. 270, 323 
Pearce, Capt. Hirvev — 1 10 
Pearl, John — 86, 1 1 3 
Pearson, Robert — 155, 204, 323 
Pearson, Stanl^v — 1 1 6 
Pearson, W-nfield — 09, 119, 387 
Pechin. Gilbert — 116 
Peck, Jean — 387 
Peck, Georee — 1 1 4 
Peck. Tudirh — 183. 387 
Peck, Manford — 192, 387 
Peck. Nin? — 164. 284. 387 
Peckham. Betty — 185. 387 
Peffly, Harold— 108 
Peine, Arthur — 144 
Pekeris, Arthur — 387 
Pellett. Walter — 99, 387 



Pence, Ed — 115 

Pence, Ernest — 200, 387 

Pence, Royce — 76, 133, 136, 192, 219, 

226, 387 
Pence, Shirley — 130, 186, 387 
Pence, Virginia — 155 
Pendergast, Wayne — 155, 387 
Pendleton, Jack — 113, 202, 387 
Penka, Jerry — 387 
Penn, Wallace— 78, 83, 323 
Pennak, Roy — 323 
Penner, Helen — 63 
Pepoon, Donald — 100, 113, 387 
Perez, Ferdinand — 113 
Periale, Joseph — 387 
Perine, Jack — 113, 388 
Perkins, Caroline — 135, 148, 154, 180, 

323 
Perkins, Elizabeth — 104, 148, 154, 180, 

388 
Perkins, Jack — 115 
Perkins, Morris — 155, 388 
Peters, Chester — 43 
Peters, Marlin — 1 13 
Peterson, Lyman — 90 
Peterson, Axel — 388 
Peterson, Charles — 388 
Peterson, Evelyn — 388 
Peterson, Frank — 388 
Peterson, Frederick — 99, 323 
Peterson, Helen — 286 
Peterson, John — 97, 325 
Peterson, Kenneth — 388 
Peterson, Leroy — 325 
Peterson, Lowell — 388 
Peterson, Loyd — 94, 98, 127, 128, 129, 

131, 302, 325 
Peterson, Nobel — 74. 117, 325 
Peterson, Mona — 186, 388 
Peterson, Paul — 325 
Peterson, Richard — 99 
Peterson, Ronald — 117 
Peterson, Sallie — 149, 183, 388 
Peterson, Ted — 279, 283 
Peterson, Verlin — 74, 325 
Petrie. Benjamin — 388 
Petrie, lean — 106 
Petro, Richard — 192, 388 
Petro, Robert — 192, 325 
Pettit, Robert — 117, 204, 325 
Peycke, Frank — 188, 388 
Pfeffer, James — 95, 325 
Pfeffer, Laura — 85 
Pfeifer, Orlene — 109 
Pfenninger, Wilbur — 83, 388 
Pfister, Wayne — 388 
Phelps, Harry — 388 
Phems — 91 
Phi Alpha Mu — 130 
Phi Chi Delta — 153 
Phi Delta Theta — 198 
Phi Epsilon Kappa — 137 
Phi Kappa — 199 
Phi Kappa Phi — 128 
Phi Lambda LIpsilon — 137 
Phillips, Blaine — 388 
Phillips, Byron — 325 
Phillips, Carroll — 388 
Phillips, Dan — 201. 388 
Phillips, Darrell — 108, 151, 388 
Phillips, Earl — 82. 116, 152, 279 
Phillips, Esther — 104. 140. 163, 388 
Philips, Margaret — 163. 388 
Phillips, Maryellen — 186, 388 
Phillips, Robert — 109 
Phillips, Willard — 78 
Phillips. William — 160, 388 
Pi Beta Phi — 186 
Pickering, Kathleen Kaup — 185, 272, 

388 
Pickett, W. F. — 41, 77 
Pierce, Arlene — 88. 163, 274, 388 
Pierce, Bernard — 100, 325 
Pierce, Forest — 1 1 3 
P.'erce, Fred — 113. 192. 388 
Pierce, G. Dick— 198. 388 
Pierce, Ilene — 163, 388 
Pierce, Robert — 388 
Piemoint, Harold — 97, 128. 131. 132, 

325 
Piersee, Avis — 164, 388 
Pierson, Norburt — 1 19 
Pierson, William — 115 
Pieschl, Vincent — 155, 172, 38S 
Piffer, Patricia — 1*6. 186. 325 
Pi Kappa Alpha — 200 
Pilcher, Claude — 155, 388 
Pilcher, Don — 388 
P'lcher, Lewis — 155 
Pilcher. Ronald — 388 
Pinger, Herbert — 63 
Pinkston. Virginia — 170, 388 
Pinnick. Loren — 111 
Pinon. Walter — 147, 160, 388 
Piper, Warren — 388 
Pishny, Margie — 81, 105, 160, 388 
Pi Tau Sigma — 132 
Pittawav. Alan — 113, 160, 388 
Pixley, Henrv — 151 

Pixley, Tosephine — 149. HI, 1 68 38S 
Pixley. Margaret — 129. 135, 168, 325 
Plagge, Donald — 388 
Platner, Evelyn — 91. 186, 388 
Pledger, Honor— 63, 128, 135. 155 
Plegge, Ernest — 205. 388 
Ploger, Donald — 113. 388 
Plow and Pen Club — 78 



Plumb, Charles — 200, 388 
Poague, Lowell — 202, 325 
Poelma, George — 90 
Pohlman, Jack — 115, 194, 388 
Pohlman, Joe — 194, 388 
Poland. Harold — 325 
Poland, Willis — 388 
Pollock, Wendell— 192, 219, 

226, 388 
Pollock, Murray — 108 
Pollom, Bob — 101, 388 
Pollom, Majol — 185, 388 
Poison, Lloyd — 113, 279, 388 
Ponte, Alfred — 101, 155, 388 
Poole, Grover — 30 
Poole, Nita — 389 
Poolay, James — 108 
Popkins, Dean — 201, 389 
Porter, Gene — 109, 389 
Porter, William — 76, 133 
Porter, William F. — 389 
Porterfield, Burt — 76, 119, 194, 389 
Porterfield, Wilma — 172, 389 
Portschi, Eldon — 114 
Postlethwaite, John — 132, 325 
Postlethwaite, Marion — 325 
Potter, Clarence — 389 
Potter, Don — 389 
Potter, Floyd — 114, 389 
Potter, George — 325 
Potter, Helen — 389 
Potter, Sherman — 389 
Pottorff, Patricia — 160, 168, 389 
Potucek, Charles — 197, 389 
Potwin. Arlan — 202, 389 
Poulsen, Walter — 83 
Poultry Science Club — 77 
Powell, Dean — 325 
Powell, Jack — 87 
Powell, Wiiram— 99, 389 
Power, Mrs. Pearl — 167 
Powers, Charles — 99, 389 
Powers, Richard — 198, 389 
Prather, Achsah — 130, 136, 171, 294, 

389 
Prather, Raymond — 113 
Prather, Rollin — 203, 219, 223, 249, 

253, 389 
Pratt, George — 116, 389 
Pratt, Jean — 179, 389 
Pratt. Joyce — 78, 91, 103, 179, 389 
Predmore. William — 99, 389 
Prentice. Doris — 106 
Prentice, Edward — 88, 389 
Presidenr — 31 
Pressgrove, Betty Lou — 81, 155. 168. 

389 
Pressnall, Dean — 389 
Prerz, James — 115. 155, 389 
Pribble. Beverly — 138, 175, 186. 288, 

325 
Price, Ben — 75, 88, 201, 389 
Price, Charles — 389 
Price, Clifford — 389 
Price, C. O. — 34 
Price. Harold — 113, 189. 325 
Price, John — 109 
Price, Lawrence — 1 14 
Price. Vernon — 389 
Price, Vonda — 325 
Pricer, Kenneth — 81. 101, 389 
Prichard, Wayne — 153 
Prickett. David — 188. 389 
Prior, Roderick — 155 
Prix — 130 

Prochaska. Dean — 389 
Prohaska. Shirley — 389 
Promusica — 87 
Pruden, James — 201, 325 
Ptacek, Ernesr — 116, 192, 389 
Pugsley, Dean Albert — 30. 53 
Pun, Ching Fone — 63. 89 
Puresselley, T/Sgt. Glenn — 110 
Purple Peosters — 227 
Putt, Charles — 15 5 
Puziss, Milton — 128 



-9- 



Ouakenbush. Donald — 81. 113. 389 

Ouakenbush, Ethan — 74. 325 

Quakenbu^h. Mrs. Laura — 89, 106 

Ouant, Robert — 389 

Ouantic. Myron — 389 

Ouill Club — 135 

Quilty. Thomas — 155 

Ouinlan. L. R. — 77 

Ouinlan. Robert — 202. 389 

Ouinlisk. Warren — 325 

Quint. Elmer — 118. 155 



— R — 



Radenberg, Marvin — 389 
Rader, Donald — 8^.95. 117. 
Rader, Ramona — 169. 389 
Rad'o Guild — 138 
Raemback. Irene — 63 
Raffington, Margaret — 39. 103 
Ragsdale, George, Jr. — 389 
Rahn, Iris— 81, 164, 389 



160 



441 



Raines, Nina — 163, 390 

Ralston, Eileen — 178, 390 

Ralston, Glen — 325 

Ramirez, Manuel — 89 

Ramm, John — 1 14 

Ramsay, Max — 390 

Ramsbottom, Hal — 81, 189, 390 

Ramsdale, Richard — 390 

Ramsey, Carrol — 81, 104, 135, 148, 

154, 171, 325 
Ramsey, Harold— 81, 82, 195, 390 
Ramsey, Jed — 279 
Ramsey, Richard — 113, 202, 390 
Ramsey, William — 96, 117, 325 
Ranck, Jack — 97, 187, 194, 390 
Randolph, Leon — 198, 390 
Rankin, Marion — 109, 390 
Rankin, Stewart— 1 14, 198, 390 
Ransom, Donald — 96, 197, 325 
Rasmusson, Eugene — 99, 114 
Ratts, Frank — 202, 390 
Rarts, Marvin — 99 
Ratts. Robert — 197, 390 
Rauch. John — 116, 390 
Ray, Charles — 270 
Ray, Donald — 390 
Ray, Harold — 144, 278, 390 
Ray, Howard — 79, 390 
Ray, Janet — 146, 272, 390 
Ray, Merrill — 1 16, 390 
Ray, Patricia — 390 
Ray, Russell — 390 
Rayne. William — 116 
Rea, Glenn — 189, 390 
Rea, Robert — 89, 198, 390 
Ready, Irma— 81, 154, 169, 325 
Ream, Donald — 390 
Ream, Leo — 88, 390 
Reardon, James — 198, 390 
Reardon, Lucy — 155, 181, 272, 325 
Reber, Ralph— 390 
Redlinger, Leonard — 63, 86, 89, 155 
Redmond, Patricia — 102, 104, 163, 325 
Redmond, Robert — 194, 390 
Reebe, Toe — 118 

Reece, Dwight — 80, 82, 113, 390 
Reed, Betty — 30 
Reed, Bonnie — 105, 390 
Reed, Daniel — 96 
Reed, Genevieve — 105, 163, 390 
Reed, Iris — 147 
Reed, Kersey — 118, 198, 390 
Reed, Leslie, Jr. — 390 
Reed, Robert — 187, 201, 390 
Reed, Ronald— 390 
Reeder, Alys— 105, 163, 390 
Rees, Lorraine — 88, 114. 204, 390 
Rees, Trevor — 75,81, 113, 148 
Reese, Charles — 116, 195, 390 
Reese, Dean— 74, 195, 278, 390 
Reese, John — 113, 390 
Regan, Mary— 155, 185, 390 
Reh, Carter— 202. 390 
Reichert, Elmer — 390 
Reichert William— 76, 155, 198, 390 
TeM. Billie — 82, 105, 100 
Reiff, John— 83, 151, 152, 325 
Reinhardt, Donald— 94, 151, 218, 279, 

390 
Reinhardt, Frederick — 97, 325 
Reinhardt, Toy— 105, 135, 153, 325 
Reinhardt, Margaret — 149, 151, 183, 

390 
Reinhart, Oliver — 390 
Reinking, Carl — 202, 390 
Reinking. Robert — 86 
Reisner. Mildred — 154, 261, 390 
Reiss, Gerald — 116, 390 
Reist, Futh — 390 
Reist, Wilfred— 79, 390 
Reitze, Alberta — 63 
Religious Federation — 146 
Relihan. David — 137, 204, 390 
Remmele. Paul — 202. 390 
Rempe. Clarence — 1 1 3 
Rempe, Josenh — 114 
Remsbere. Albert — 114 
Reneau, Vedyn — 101 
Renner, T. R. — 88. 391 
Renner, Tohn — 113 
Renner, Wanda — 191 
Rensch. Donaleigh — 163, 391 
Rethorst. Robert — 391 
Reu. Rob-rt — 116 
Rewerts, Charles — 148, 391 
Rewerts. Thomas — 391 
Rexroad, T->v — 99, 101, 301 
Rexroad. Warren — 194, 391 
Rexroat. Jordon — 90, 109, 391 
Reynard, Leon — 254 
Reynolds, Alfonso — 106, 391 
Reynolds, Alvera — 102, 391 
Reynolds, Tohn — 301 
Reynolds, TeRoy — 117, 200, 391 
Reynolds, Robert — 200, 391 
Reynolds. William — 391 
Rezac. Mariorie — 81, 301 
Reznicek, Paul — 155, 391 
Rhea. Kenneth — 113 
Rhoades, Kavmond — 325 
Rhoades, Winfred — 86 
Rice, Donald — 115 
Rice, Kenneth — 81, 325 
Rice, LeRoy — 391 
Rice, Robert — 391 
Rice, Walter, Jr. — 148, 391 
Rice, Warren — 200, 391 



151, 183, 300, 



127, 129, 
325, 326 



144, 



391 
167, 



391 



392 



Rice, Vivian — 148 
Rich, Betty— 145, 149, 

391 
Rich, William— 391 
Richards, Bill — 115,391 
RichardsTrank— 97 ,132,325 
Richards.Major Hartzell — 110 
Richards, Ruth— 169, 391 
Richards, William — 73, 76, 

133, 136, 155, 192, 278, 
Richardson, Warren — 391 
Richter, Bernice — 152 
Richter, Emmett — 1 14 
Richter, Jack — 152 
Richter, Wayne — 391 
Rickert, William— 88, 201, 325 
Ricklefs, Margaret— 183, 391 
Ricklefs, Ralph— 77, 192, 278, 325 
Rieb, Jack— 131, 132, 193, 325 
Rieb, Sidney — 193, 391 
Riederer, Robert — 391 
Rieg, Bill — 101, 155, 193, 325 
Riegel, Don — 81, 82, 148, 391 
Rieniets, William— 83 
Rife, Harold— 83, 86 
Riffel, Edward — 128, 195, 325 
Rigel, Elmer — 100, 150, 391 
Riggs, Fletcher— 79, 133, 325 
Riggs, Marvin — 75, 79, 81, 133, 

146, 148, 325 
Rigler, William — 88, 200, 391 
Riley, Dolores — 166 
Riley, Loren— 113, 187, 197, 391 
Riley, Mary Alice— 181, 391 
Riley, Weldon — 81, 133, 391 
Rinkel, Howard — 76, 147, 391 
Riseman, Aldona — 82, 83 
Rishel, Robert— 151, 391 
Rislye, Ivan — 80, 113 
Ritterhouse, Fayne — 391 
Rix, Howard — 147, 391 
Rix, Mary Jane — 275 
Roach, Bernard — 88, 204, 
Roach, Jeanne — 103, 155, 
Roach, Mary — 180, 391 
Roach, Thomas — 99, 391 
Roark, Donald — 128 
Robb, Jimmie — 194, 392 
Robbins, Durreth — 81, 116 
Robbins, Fobert — 203, 392 
Roberds, Dale — 113 
Robert. LaVetne — 184, 392 
Roberts, Bob — 113 
Roberts, Dixie — 106 
Roberts, Donald — 113 
Roberts, John M.— 98 
Roberts, Tohn R. — 118, 198, 
Roberts, Thomas — 83. 392 
Roberson, Carlton — 201, 325 
Robertson, Merlyn — 392 
Robinett. Tames — 205, 392 
Robins, Edward — 81, 85 
Robins, John — 74 
Robinson, Edwin — 302 
Robinson, Farrel — 392 
Robinson, George A. — 146, 148, 188, 

392 
Robinson, George H.— 79, 113, 152 
Robinson Kathryn — 91, 147, 149, 160, 

170, 392 
Rob : nson, Lucy — 185, 392 
Robinson. Phelena — 170 
Robohn, Walter— 155 
Robson Robert — 392 
Roby, Rirhard— 203, 392 
Rochat. Glen — 325 
Rock, Marie— 91, 227, 325 
Rockers, -Anthony, Tr. — 113 
Rockers, Donald — 76. 102 
Rockers, Tames — 74. 155. 278. 325 
Rockers. Leonard — 88, 113, 392 
Rode, Tohn — 155 
Roderick. Dr. L. M. — 57 
Rodick. Ray — 8S. 151, 392 
Roe. Lauren — 1 16 
Roembark. Irene — 1 5 1 
Roepke, Donald — 102 
Roepke. Marjorie — 81, 83, 130, 151, 

169, 302 
Roepke, Ross — 1 1 5 
Roesener. ArNe — 114. 
Rogers, Rev. B. A. — 146 
Rogers, Mrs. B. A. — 140. 151 
Rogers, Donald — 115. 237, 392 
Roeers, Mrs. E. E. — 169 
Rogers, Fred — 113 
Roeers. George — 84. 102 
Rogers, Ira, Jr.— 116. 201. 192 
Rogers, Tacquelin — 183. 102 
Rogers, Tane — 01, 227, 392 
Rogers, Tohn — 75. 115. 392 
Rogers. Norman D. — 114, 160 
Roeers, Robert — 202. 392 
Roeers. Thomas — 325 
Rohr, Mary — 166 
Rokey. Ned— 109, 189, 192 
Rolf. Flovd — 133, 195, 325 
Roller, Michael— 109 
Roller. O-Dal — 325 
Rolls. Clarence — 05. 1^2, 325 
Romero, Ray — 111. 210. 221, 225 
Rondeau. H. E — 108. 102 
Rood, Marv — 07. 184, 325 
Foot. Vearl — 102 
Rosacker, William — 76, 392 
Rosania, Gustavo — 89, 392 
Rose, Edward— 1 1 5 



192 



Rose, Ray — 81, 392 

Rose, Richard — 101 

Roseberry, Cyrilka — 89, 179, 327 

Rosenbaum, Harold — 257, 392 

Rosenow, Richard — 74, 327 

Ross, Arthur, Jr. — 113 

Ross, Bernard — 101 

Ross, Charles — 79 

Ross, Donald — 392 

Ross, Hal— 76, 116, 133, 198, 392 

Ross, Norma — 164, 392 

Ross, Robert — 113 

Rossiter, William — 75, 135, 392 

Rostocil, Jean — 169, 392 

Rotar, Louis — 101, 131 

ROTC — 110, 119 

Roth, Barbara— 135, 163, 272, 392 

Roth, Elmer — 392 

Roth, Jack— 155,392 

Rothfelder, Avlin — 392 

Roths, Norbert — 114 

Rothweiler, Jerry — 115. 392 

Rottinghaus, Bernard — 97, 155, 199, 

327 
Rotty, Helen— 135, 147, 161, 166, 327 
Roush, Edwes — 163, 274, 275, 392 
Roush, Gale— 114, 392 
Rowland, Arlyn — 205, 392 
Rowley, Dale — 113 
Royal Purple — 285, 289 
Roy, Charles— 327 
Rubick, Beverly— 179, 392 
Rudbeck, Robert — 118 
Ruddick, Bernard — 392 
Rudy, Keith — 197, 392 
Rugan.Jean — 185, 392 
Ruggels, Frank — 116, 392 
Ruggels, Paul — 116, 205, 392 
Ruhaak, James— 116, 151, 392 
Rule, Frances — 151, 168, 392 
Rumford. Evelyn — 163 
Rundus. Ivan — 272, 268 
Russ, Oliver — 393 

Russel. Margaret — 81, 104, 163, 393 
Russell, Anne — 186, 393 
Russell, Dan— 109, 187, 189, 393 
Russell. Dorothy— 106 
Russell, Frances — 89, 144, 151, 163, 

393 
Russeli, John— 76, 155, 393 
Russell. Lyle — 393 
Rutherford, Harold — 99 
Ruthrauff, James — 99 
Rutschmann, Edwin — 95, 327 
Ryan, Charles — 90, 155, 199, 
Ryan, Danny — 202, 393 
Ryan. Delia — 327 



327 



s — 



327 



327 



Saathoff, Walter — 116 

Sachen, Albert — 101, 155, 393 

Sack, Betty — 106 

Sack, Marion — 155 

Sackman. Richard — 146 

Sackman, Ross — 1 13, 146 

Sage, Mary — 393 

Sage, Stephen — 88, 118, 202, 393 

Sageser, Floyd — 204, 284, 393 

Salazar, Cuauhtemoc — 61, 76. 133 

Salberg. Delmar— 204, 218, 393 

Salero. Deloris — 393 

Salisbury, Gail— 88, 90, 144, 153, 204, 

393 
Salisbury, Ralph— 29, 90, 134, 283, 

286, 393 
Salyer, Thomas — 116, 200. 393 
Sampson, Charles — 196, 393 
Sampson, Jack — 203, 393 
Sampson, Raymond — 393 
Samuelson, Armin — 81, 113 
Samuelson, Grace- — 88, 151, 163, 
Sanchez, John — 89, 144 
Sanders, Elisha — 393 
Sanders, Philip — 75, 78, 195, 271. 
Sanders, Wayne — 188, 393 
Sanderson, Arden — 393 
Sanderson. Dallas — 90, 327 
Sands, Robert — 393 
Sanford. Howard — 113 
Sanger, Dr. R. O. — 46 
Santner, Robert — 98 
Santoro, William — 108, 192, 393 
Saperste : n, Hyman — 107 
Sarver, Lois— 154, 163, 393 
Savage, Jack — 75, 113, 189, 393 
Savage, Nora — 69 
Sawicki. T/Sgt. Stanley — 110 
Sawin, Dean — 393 
Sayler. Robert — 90, 100 
Scalapino. Ralph — 82, 83, 327 
Scanlan,Glen — 88, 117, 155, 191, 393 
Scarborough, Nira — 185, 327 
Schaaf, Herbert — 393 
Schafer, Mrs. Edward — 92 
Schafer, Lawrence — 1 16 
Schafer. Paul, Jr. — 109 
Schardein. Phyllis— 164, 327 
Schartz, Thon — 113 
Schattenburg, Gerard — 393 
Scheets, George — 76 
Schell, Arlyn — 113 
Schellenberger, John — 133 
Schendel, William — 393 



Schenk, William, Jr. — 197, 393 
Scherer, Charles — 119 
Scherer, John — 155, 393 
Schille, William— 88 
Schilling, William — 116, 393 
Schimmels, Ross— 90, 150, 204, 393 
Schindelar, Joseph — 393 
Schindler, June — 153, 163, 327 
Schirer, Marshall — 81, 113, 276, 393 
Schirmer, David — 75, 189, 219, 224, 

226, 300, 327 
Schirmer, Duane — 75, 189, 393 
Schjerven, Sigrid — 179, 393 
Schlagel, Mary — 81, 85, 155, 164, 393 
Schlender, John — 152 
Schmalzried, Raymond — 95, 393 
Schmidt, Francis — 88, 155, 327 
Schmidt, Lyle — 88, 118, 393 
Schmidt, Robert— 101, 137, 327 
Schmidt, Robert Lee — 393 
Schmidt, Virginia — 184, 227, 327 
Schmidt, Winston— 96, 131, 192, 278, 

327 
Schmitt, Audrey— 102, 103, 149, 151, 

179,327 
Schmitt, Major Bernard — 110 
Schmitt, Bernard L. — 88, 327 
Schmitz, Natalie? — 181, 394 
Schmitz, Richard — 78, 193, 394 
Schneider, Lewis — 116, 151, 152 
Schneider, Raymond — 94, 96, 131, 278, 

327 
Schneiker, Jacob — 153, 394 
Schnittker, John — 114, 155, 199, 279, 

394 
Scholer, Prof. C. H. — 50 
Scholl, Georgia— 78, 166, 394 
Scholz, Earl — 394 
Scholz, Mary — 394 
Schoof, Donald — 394 
Schoof, James— 116, 394 
School of Agriculture — 40-43 
School of Arts and Sciences — 44-47 
School of Engineering and Architecture — 

48-51 
Schooler, David, Jr. — 394 
School of Home Economics — 52-5 5 
School of Veterinary Medicine — 56-59 
Schoonhoven, Paul — 109 
Schoonover, Herbert— 116, 205, 394 
Schoonover, Nancy — 186, 288, 194 
Schott, Rev. R. — 155 . 
Schovee, Mary — 186, 327 
Schovee, William — 201, 394 
Schowalter, Duane — 394 
Schowengerdt, Dean — 73, 81, 85, 129, 

133, 195. 394 
Schowengerdt, Marjories — 81, 127, 129, 

135, 151, 301, 327 
Schrader, Henry — 155 
Schrader, Toseph — 74, 155, 327 
Schrader, Julius— 117, 155 
Schreiber, Marjorie — 166, 394 
Schreiber, Ralph — 394 
Schreiner. Ronald — 8'0, 147 
Schridde, Calvin— 81, 394 
Schrimshaw, Oakley — 120 
Schroeder, Loren— 95, 136, 327 
Schruben, John — 06, 128, 155, 327 
Schrum, Tack— 155, 394 
Schrum.Neil — 394 
Schuh. Tames— 200, 394 
Schultejans, Wilbert— 15 5, 204, 394 
Schultz, Ernest — 115, 202, 394 
Schultz, Robett — 146. 394 
Schultz, Ruth — 103. 394 
Schultz. William — 394 
Schulz, Dr. Lois — 53 
Schumacher. Cliford — 115. 202. 394 
Schumann, Arthur— 81. 110. 279, 394 
Schupbach, Eleanor — 135, 327 
Schupbach. Robert — 1 09 
Schwab. Frederick — 113, 204, 394 
Schwab. Merle — 205, 304 
Schwartz. Marcellus— 113. 155, 394 
Schwartz, Paul — 99, 204, 394 
Schwartz, Victor — 96, 327 
Schwattzkopf, Donald — 15 1 
Schwartzman. Joseph — 96 
Schwarz, Leland — 116, 394 
Schwarz, Lvnn — 304 
Schweder, Carl — 394 
Schweiger, Frank — 97. 128, 132, 327 
Schwe : ger, Rudolph — 394 
Schwensen, Men — 115. 192, 272, 394 
Schwilling, Marvin — 394 
Schwindaman. Dale — 81, 116, 394 
Scoggan. Lowell — 204, 394 
Scott, Ada— 394 
Scott, Catherine — 327 
Scott, Don W.— 197. 394 
Scott, Donald R. — 115, 118, 394 
Scott, Elma — 394 
Scott, Emmett — 79, 394 
Scott, Gene — 1 14 
Scott, Kenneth— 113, 189, 394 
Scott, Loran— 82. 110. 146, 151, 394 
Scott, Shirley— 103, 147, 394 
Scott, Watren — 394 
Scrvel, Evererr — 114 
Scribante, Adrian — 116, 394 
Scully, Paul— 155, 199, 394 
Seal, Jack— 113, 394 
Seaman. Marian — 164, 394 
Sears, Elnora — 394 
Seaton, E. Margaret— 89, 130, 394 
Seaton, Garrett — 74, 195, 395 



442 



Seay, Jim — 150 

Sedgwick, Virginia — 81, 182, 395 

Sedlacek, Marian — 81, 163, 395 

Sedlock, Robert — 155, 199, 327 

Seever, Ed — 155 

Seidler, Migdonio — 89, 395 

Seifert, Robert — 395 

Seiffe, Joann — 327 

Seiffe, Warren — 111 

Seiler, Neva — 81, 169, 395 

Seiwert, Edward — 113 

Selby, Bruce — 113, 395 

Selby, Joe — 109 

Selby, Maytha — 149, 151, 169, 395 

Selfridge, Dorothy — 180, 395 

Self ridge, Kent — 395 

Sellers, Ernest — 94, 127, 129, 131, 132, 

193,327 
Sellers, Prof. G. A. — 50 
Sellers, Gabe, Jr. — 96, 129, 132, 278, 

327 
Sellers, Kenneth — 193, 395 
Sells, Georganna — 154, 163, 395 
Semon, Jack — 395 
Sence, Leonard — 116, 253 
Seniors — 302-333 
Senior Class Officers — 300 
Servis, Barbara — 164, 395 
Sestric, Michael, Jr. — 155, 200, 218, 

395 
Setter, Donald — 113, 192, 395 
Setter, Marjorie — 155, 282, 327 
Settle, Russell — 218, 395 
Severance, Robert, Jr. — 81, 395 
Severns, Virgil — 115, 395 
Severson. Harold — 109 
Sewell, William — 116 
Shadid, Samir — 89, 395 
Shafer, Mrs. Edward — 183 
Shafer, Curtis — 1 15 
Shafer, William— 117 
Shaffer, Rex — 116 
Shaffer, Robert — 116, 274, 395 
Shank, Harry — 327 
Shannon, Charles — 97 
Shannon, Eldon — 113 
Shannon, Harry — 99 
Shannon, Howard — 202, 229, 395 
Shannon, James — 116, 395 
Shapiro, Eugene — 96, 327 
Shapiro, Lillian — 128 
Sharp, Guy — 327 
Sharp, Horace, Jr. — 395 
Sharp, Jack — 136, 219 
Sharp, Raymond — 114 
Sharpe, Buford — 79, 395 
Sharpe, Darrell — 395 
Sharpsteen, Lloyd — 155 
Sharpsteen, Louise — 106 
Shaw, Edward— 202, 395 
Shaw, Iris — 81, 395 
Shaw, Marjory — 163. 395 
Shaw, Robert — 97, 202, 278, 395 
Shaw, Warren — 395 
Shea, William — 155 
Sheahon. Lester — 395 
Sheats, Donald — 194, 395 
Sheehan, John — 395 
Sheets, Richard — 193, 395 
Shellenberger, Dr. J. A.— 41, 76. 89 
Shelley, Guy, Jr. — 132, 202, 327 
Shelley, James— 111, 202, 395 
Shelor, Laura — 171, 395 
Shelor, Marion — 327 
Shelton, Edgar — 395 
Shenkel, Roger — 202, 395 
Shepler, Robert — 115, 395 
Sheppard, Will-am — 198, 395 
Sherer. John — 395 

Sheriff, Albert, Jr. — 136, 243, 247, 395 
Sherley, Kenneth — 113 
Sherlock, Charles — 78, 191, 395 
Sherman, George, Jr. — 136, 192, 252, 

396 
Sherman, Richard — 88 
Sherrell, Roy— 136. 137, 327 
Sherrod, Howard — 115, 396 
Shields, Harold— 76, 111, 133, 327 
Shields, James — 1 1 5 
Shinogle. Paul — 155 
Shipley, Dorothy — 170, 396 
Shipley, Will : am — 113 
Shipman, William — 396 
Shireman. Lowell — 101 
Shirky, Max — 396 
Shockey, Laurence — 200, 396 
Shogren, Keene — 95 
Shoop, Marion — 203, 327 
Shortle, Tames — ^96 
Shrake, Virginia — 102, 153, 180, 396 
Shriver, Tames — 306 
Shriver. Lester — 117. 194, 396 
Shull, Ernest— 116. 396 
Shumaker Rose — 136. 396 
Shumate. Maynard — 1 1 1 
Shupe, John— 97, 127, 129, 131, 132, 

180, 200, 327 
Shupp, Danny— 111, 132, 200, 278, 

327 
Sias, Roy — 218 
Sibley, Mrs. Verne; — 197 
Siburt. Thomas — 108 
Sidfrid, La Verne — 115 
Sidorowicz, Norbert — 155, 278, 396 
Sidwell, Lloyd — 115 
Sidwell, Richard— 205, 396 
Siebert, Ignatius — 155 



Siefkin, Robert — 197, 396 

Siegele, Jessie — 333 

Siegele, Merle — 151, 152, 396 

Sieh, Chen — 151 

Sigler, Porter — 1 15 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon — 201 

Sigma Delta Chi — 134 

Sigma Eta Chi — 154 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon — 82 

Sigman, Richard — 257 

Sigma Nu — 202 

Sigma Phi Epsilon — 203 

Sigma Tau — 131 

S'gsbee, George — 98, 200, 327 

Siler, Leanna — 87, 163, 274, 275, 327 

Siler, Robert — 147 

Silker, Wyatt— 114 

Silson, Dale— 151 

Silva, Juanita — 87, 91, 138, 272, 396 

Silva, Louis — 396 

Simcox, Flavel — 99, 396 

Simcox, Pauline — 78, 327 

Simecka, William — 115 

Simkins, Charles — 74, 327 

Simmons, Benjamin — 113 

Simmons, Donald — 87, 396 

Simmons, Herbert — 272, 327 

Simmons, John — 202, 327 

Simmons, Richard — 1 1 3 

Simms, James — 1 13 

Simon, Elmer — 274, 396 

Simonton, Calvin — 204, 396 

Simonton, Wendell — 188, 396 

Simpson, Mary — 146, 272, 327 

Simpson, William — 396 

Sims, Audrey — 147 

Sims, Mildred — 146, 147, 170, 396 

Singer, Herbert — 147, 160, 327 

Sink, John — 396 

Sinkovic, Paul — 396 

Sinn, JoAnn — 396 

Siron, Kay — 144, 327 

Sizemore, June — 89. 109, 396 

Sizemore, Richard — 46, 94. Ill, 127, 

129, 131, 278, 301, 329 
Sjo, John — 79, 81, 150. 396 
Sjogren, Ralph — 115, 203, 396 
Skaggs, Marian — 183, 272, 396 
Skahan, Tom — 155, 199, 396 
Skalla, Harold — 97, 396 
Skelton, Bernita — 89, 146, 167, 396 
Skelton, J. D. — 95. 132, 329 
Skelton, John — 128 
Skelton, Kenneth — 396 
Skelton, Robert — 198, 396 
Skinner, Donna — 396 
Skinner. Dorothy — 396 
Skinner, Fredrick — 108 
Skoog, Ralph — 83, 115 
Skywood Hall — 171 
Slattery, Michael — 197, 396 
Slawson. Charles — 128, 132, 329 
Sleder. Harry— 396 
Slief, Forrest — 396 
Slifer, Lois— 104, 396 
Sloan, Donald— 114, 396 
Sloan. Eloise — 396 
Slyhoff, Kent — 191, 396 
Smart. Alfred — 396 
Smejkal, Donald — 1 16 
Smies, William— 74, 195, 396 
Smiley. Neill — 192. 396 
Smith, Bob— 98. 274 ^29 
Smith, Calv : n — 147, 396 
Smith, Celia — 396 
Smith, Charles L. — 114. 396 
Smith, Charles N. — 99, 396 
Smith, Clyde — 75, 396 
Smith, Cole — 197, 396 
Smith, DileF. — 74. 329 
Smith, DaleL. — 397 
Smith, David — 202, 397 
Smith, D^an — 115 
Smith, Edward — 87 
Smith, Ellen — 179, 397 
Smith, Eugene — 113, 202, 397 
Smith, Forrest — 147. 397 
Smith. Fred — 196, 397 
Smith, George E. — 329 
Smith, George L.— 78, 190, 219, 221, 

275. 397 
Smth, Gerald— 128. 329 
Smith, Harold D. — 101. 205, 397 
Smith, Harold L. — 75, 397 
Smith, Hatry — 87 
Smifh, Herman — 77 
Smith, Howard — 86 
Smith, Hubert — 190, 397 
Smith, Iris — 300 
Smith, Tames — 101 
Smith, Tean — 181. 397 
Smith, Keith — 329 
Smith, LaMarr — 99 
Smith, Louis— 88. 397 
Smith, Marilyn — 163. 397 
Smith, Marvin — 79. 114, 151, 397 
Smith. Mary E. — 81. 151, 161, 168. 

329 
Snv'th, Mary H. — 154. 397 
Smith, Max — 274. 300. 397 
Smith, N-dine — 29, 145, 186, 218, 

227, 397 
Smith. Ray— 75, 397 
Smith, Raymond A. — 397 
Smith, Raymond S. — 193, 397 
Smith, Richard — 397 
Smith, Robert B. — 113 



Smith, Robert B. — 114 

Smith, Robert D. — 46 

Smith, Robert K. — 90 

Smith, Robert N. — 202, 397 

Smith, Roger — 86 

Smith, Shirley A.— 179, 397 

Smith, Shirley W. — 181, 227, 276, 397 

Smith, Thomas E. — 219, 397 

Smith, Virginia — 63 

Smith, Walter — 101, 397 

Smith, Wanda — 397 

Smith, William D. — 397 

Smoll, Owen — 397 

Smoot, David — 190, 397 

Smurthwaite, Georgianna — 61 

Smull, Margaret — 329 

Smull, Neil — 329 

Snail, Charles — 397 

Snider, Lyle— 75, 81, 151, 189, 397 

Snodgrass, William — 108 

Snook, Dr. R. R. — 34 

Snowball— FMOC— 72 

Snowbarger, Marieta — 146, 329 

Snyder, Duane — 1 13, 274 

Snyder, Emelia — 185, 272, 329 

Snyder, Eugene — 136, 200, 329 

Snyder, Harold— 172, 397 

Snyder, Marvin — -172, 397 

Snyder, Robert D.— 8 1,116,397 

Snyder, Robert L. — 197, 397 

Snyder, Wanda— 148, 154, 171, 397 

Sobers, Bonnie — 81, 149, 151, 160, 329 

Socolofsky, Dorothy — 149, 151, 397 

Soelter, Robert — 202, 397 

Solomon, Frank-^114 

Somers, Orris — 170 

Sommer, Eleanor — 146, 272 

Sondergard, Walter — 397 

Soper, Nanette — 185, 288, 397 

Sophomore Class Officers — 300 

Sorenson, Jimmy — 114 

Sorenson, June — 103, 186, 329 

Sorrick, Floyd — 397 

Spake, Dr. L. B. — 30 

Spangler, Clifford — 80, 147, 397 

Spare, Richard — 82, 146, 397 

Sparks, Howard — 90, 398 

Spaun, Eugene — 96 

Spearman, Mrs. Alice — 166 

Spearman, Jesse — 196. 398 

Spears, Helen — 81, 105, 163, 398 

Specht, Henry — 398 

Speck, Henry — 237 

Speer, Doran — 1 15 

Speer, Edward— 81, 116, 151, 398 

Speer, Robert — 81, 151, 398 

Spencer, Edward — 95. 398 

Spencer, Godfrey — 197, 329 

Spencer, Harvey — 101, 131, 137, 329 

Spencer, James — 398 

Spencer, Paul — 109, 398 

Spencer, Richard — 100 

Spencer, William — 398 

Sperry, Prof. A. B. — 46, 82, 83 

Spiers, Virgil — 200, 398 

Spinneft, Jason — 146 

Spitze. Don — 115, 398 

Spomer, Ralph — 100 

Spring, Donald — 115 

Springer. Glenn — 97, 203, 329 

Springer. Neola — 149, 171. 329 

Springer, Will am — 200, 398 

Sprinkel Carol— 81, 151, 163, 398 

Stadel, Thelma— 105, 167, 398 

Stafford, Donald — 190, 398 

Stahlman, Clarence — 82 

Staley, Mary — 181, 272, 329 

Stallard, Phillip— 111, 203, 329 

Stallbaumer, Valerian — 99 

Stallsworth, Mary — 398 

Staltet. James — 398 

Starr back Donald — 188. 398 

Stambaugh, Francis — 398 

Stangle, Donald — 398 

Stangle, Everett — 398 

Stanley, Tames — 114. 279 

Stanley, John — 191, 218, 398 

Stansbury. Roy — 86, 398 

Stanton, D°smond — 150 

Stanton, Elliott — 113. 398 

Stanton, Harold — 100, 148, 398 

Stanton, Mrs. Joan — 398 

Stanton, Joyce — 148 

Stanton Raymond — 113, 398 

Stapp, Dewaine — 78. 113 

Stark. Edward — 77, 398 

Stark, Robert — 190. 398 

Starkey, George — 81, 151, 274. 398 

Starkey. Margaret — 151. 274, 398 

Statks, Benton — 1 1 1 

Stauffer, George — 81, 114 

Stauffer, Oscar — 30 

Stedham. Thelma To — 154. 186. 329 

Steele, Bobbie — 271, 398 

Steele, Eugene — 1 19 

Steele, Oliver — 132, 39S 

Steele, Richard — 132 

Steele. William — 74, 329 

Steel Rine — 131 

Steeples. D-ane — 79, 81, 116, 398 

Steeples, Hillon — 398 

Steeples, Toanne — 164, 398 

Stehley. Donald — 200. 219. 398 

Stehley. James— 219, 224, 226 

Stein, Carolyn — 104, 160, 398 

Steinbacher, Raymond — 99, 197. 398 

Steincamp, Charles — 83, 198, 398 






399 
272, 399 



Steiner, Ruth — 163, 398 

Steinhoff, Rosetta — 167, 398 

Steinkirchner, Arthur — 83, 398 

Steinkirchner, Kenneth — 155, 197, 398 

Stenzel, Samuel — 79, 398 

Stepanek, Ronald — 116 

Stephan, Bonnie — 398 

Stephans, Mrs. Ransom — -179 

Stephens, Verne — 87, 398 

Stephenson, Everett — 75, 201, 329 

Stephenson, Wallace— 109 

Sterling, Leonard — 153 

Sterling, Robert — 113, 151,398 

Sterns, John — 201, 398 

Sterns, Ruth — 398 

Steuart, Donald — 1 1 3 

Steunenberg, Thomas — 275 

Stevens, Donald — 96, 204, 329 

Stevens, William — 113, 398 

Stevenson, Charles — 398 

Stevenson, James — 1 1 3 

Steward, James — 86 

Stewart, Bennie — 88, 144, 198, 287, 

288, 329 
Stewart, Gawain — 398 
Stewart, George — 108, 148 
Stewart, Harold — 88, 398 
Stewart, Jack — 80 
Stewart, John H. — 147 
Stewart, John R.— 101, 200, 399 
Stewart, Katherine — 148, 154 
Stewart, LaVonna — 169, 399 
Stewart, Robert — 200. 329 
Stickley, Edward — 137 
Stickler, Celia — 163 
Stienstra, Betsy — 186, 399 
Stigall, Edward — 399 
Stiles, Frank — 108 
Stiles, Shirley — 164, 399 
Stiles, Vance — 81, 113, 399 
Stinebaugh, Elizabeth — 168, 
Stinson. Ronald — 116, 187, 
Stock. Douglas — 202, 399 
Stockcbrand, Marilee — 136. 399 
Stockebrand, Norma — 163, 399 
Stockman, Dick — 94, 132, 155, 197, 

278, 399 
Stockton, Forrest — 399 
Stockwell, Gretchen — 160, 399 
Stockwell. Sara — 105. 163, 399 
Stodder, George — 399 
Stoecker, Bernita — 104, 149, 151, 168, 

399 
Stohr, John— 188, 218, 399 
Stohr, Kenneth — 1 1 3 
Stoltenberg, Robert G — 115, 195, 399 
Stoltenberg, Robert L. — 399 
Stone, Howard — 197, 274, 399 
Stone, Tack — 237 

Stone. Rex — 116, 151, 198, 300, 399 
Stonebraker, Robert — 1 15 
Stoner, Clifton — 399 
Stoner. Dale — 329 
Stoppel. Vada — 399 
Stork, Gertrude — 91. 
Stoskopf, Doris — 399 
Stough Herbert — 278 
Stous. Thelma — 69. 88, 180, 1 
Stovall, Stanley — 155 
Stover, Dorothy — 85, 

399 
Stover, Kenneth — 399 
Stover. Wilma — 151 
Sr. Pat's Prom — 125 
St. Pierre. Keith — 115, 
Straight. Wilma — 181, 
Strathman. Kitty — 155, 164, 
Stratton. Charles — 275 
Stratton. Gwendolyn — 169, 399 
Stratton. Lewis — 81, 119, 205, 399 
Streeter. Robert — 193. 399 
Streiff. Dean — 160, 218, 399 
Streit, Carol — 160, 399 
Strene, John — 155 
Strieker, Andrew — 399 
Strickland. Dav'd — 399 
Strickler, Robert — 113, 399 
Strickler. Lowell — 82. 399 
Stricklin. Helen— 81. 105, 147, 149, 

182, 399 
Stricklin. Loreta — 29. 80, 103. 104. 

129. 146, 147. 149. 182. M0, 329 
Strobel, Vadaline — 81, 104, 135, 148, 

329 
Strobridge. Raymond — 1 1 6 
Strohm, James — 150. 399 
Strohm, Patricia — 399 
Strohm. Paul — 400 
Strong. Don — 1 13 
Strosnider. Glenn — 155, 400 
Stroup. JoAnn — 180. 272, 400 
Strouts. Lawrence — 400 
Strowig, Barbara — 272. 329 
Strowig, Louis — 203. 400 
Strutt, Inez — 138, 26S, 272, 329 
Stuart. William — 150, 200, 251, 252, 

253,400 
Student Architects Association — 96 
Student Council — 36, 37 
Student LTnion Committee — 38 
Stueder, Elmer — 116, 400 
Stuewe, Lois — 400 
Sturdevant, James — 75, 329 
Srurdevant, Phyllis — 106 
Sturdev;int, William — 188, 400 



155, 164, 399 



399 



163, 227, 261, 



399 

272, 399 
399 



443 



Sturtevant. Lois — 329 

Stutz, Duane — 119 

Su, PeSin — 63, 89 

Suelter, Clarence — 113, 279 

Suiter, Clanton — 200, 329 

Suiter, Kenneth — 172, 400 

Sulinski, Stephanie — 275 

Sullens, James L. — 400 

Sullivant, Thomas W.— 271 

Summers, Curtis D. — 119, 400 

Sumner, James A. — 1 13 

Sundberg, Paul — 400 

Sundgren, Laurel— 81, 400 

Sunquist, Virgil— 201, 400 

Suther, Edith— 400 

Sutter, Elaine — 149, 151, 163, 400 

Sutter, Max — 117, 202 

Sutton, Earl — 400 

Sutton, Frank — 108 

Sutton, William — 400 

Swallow, Clarence — 1 16 

Swan, Marion — 400 

Swan, Paul, Jr. — 116, 274, 275, 400 

Swan, Robert, Jr. — 117, 400 

Swanson, Deane — 160, 400 

Swanson, Emory — 81 

Swanson, Howard — 200. 400 

Swanson, John — 101, 329 

Swanson, Mrs. Neil — 171 

Swanson, Richard— 96, 131, 202, 329 

Swarner, Suzanne — 104, 179, 400 

Swart, Raymond — 109 

Swartz, Jocelyn— 183, 272, 400 

Swartz, Max — 81, 113, 400 

Swearingen, Ralph — 87, 329 

Swearingen, William — 400 

Sweeney, Paul — 15 5, 400 

Swenson, Eugene — 76, 195, 400 

Swenson, Mary Ann — 81, 163, 400 

Swenson. Yvonne — 36, 167, 178, 400 

Swezey, Donna — 1>63, 272, 400 

Swiercinsky, Paula — 400 

Swift, Warren — 400 

Switzer, James — 400 

Syfert, Ervin — 77, 87, 188, 279, 329 

Syler, Robert — 329 

Sylvis, Harold— 113 

Szatalowicz, Marion — 109, 199, 400 



— T — 



Tabor, Keith — 283 
Tabor, Milton — 283 
Taddicken, Helen — 400 
Tadeusiak, George — 219 
Taff, Shirley— 181, 400 
Takushi, Takeo — 115, 400 
Tamblyn, Elizabeth — 89, 329 
Tarrant, Curtis — 75, 113, 400 
Tarver, Donald— 78, 192, 400 
Tasker, John — 73, 78, 133, 134, 

276, 278, 329 
Tate. Frederick— 190, 400 
Tate, Laverne— 169, 400 
Tau KapDa Epsilon — 204 
Taylor, Betty — 329 
Taylor, Bonnie — 152, 400 
Taylor, Charley — 400 
Taylor, Corinne — 152 
Taylor, Dean — 329 
Taylor, Dorothy — 329 
Taylor. Mrs. E. L.— 202 
Taylor, Ellen — 400 
Taylor, Eula — 138, 329 
Taylor, Everett — 99, 204, 400 
Taylor, Frank — 400 
Taylor, Harriett— 128, 136, 329 
Taylor, James W. — 114, 151, 400 
Taylor, J